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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Okie Dokie's Avatar
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    Cadence on Trainer Different with Mtb vs Road?

    I use an old 8spd mtn bike as my trainer bike and find that it just does not feel natural to pedal at 90 or above rpms,

    Wondering if this is because it is a mtn bike? Not sure if it makes a difference or not but wondering what you guys think.

    thx

    Eric
    Originally Posted by XC62701
    Agreed...make it longer. I want to know death is an option

  2. #2
    Primative Screwhead
    Reputation: Feideaux's Avatar
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    In power testing, 110 rpm frequently comes up as a particularly effective/efficient cadence over 4mins. From data set of 50 elite athletes...most are wrecked after that effort though.

    Shouldn't you be varying your cadence depending upon desired intensity and duration?

    30-60rpm for strength endurance. 130-160rpm for sprinting/speed drills,etc.

    Edit: just realised that wasn;t the question you asked

    Yes, the cleat position and q-factor on your MTB cranks may affect how fast you can spin.
    Ego maniacs please object to my posts.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Thanks for info though

    Is a mtn bike crank shorter or longer then a road bikes? Does the wheel size make a difference?

    On a mtn bike I know cadence is usually lower...just always thought it was due to terrain. But now I am starting to wonder if other things determine it more.
    Originally Posted by XC62701
    Agreed...make it longer. I want to know death is an option

  4. #4
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    That's most likely down to riding on the turbo trainer, rather than the bike itself. When you're pedalling against the resistance of a typical turbo trainer it feels different to riding outdoors, like pedalling through treacle. One of the responses to that is that you can find yourself preferring a different (lower) pedalling cadence to your usual cadence when riding outside.

    Another thing to bear in mind is that when doing intervals indoors on the turbo trainer you'll sometimes find that exercise heart rate ends up being lower indoors than when doing the same intervals outdoors, even though you're trying hard.

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