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  1. #1
    Cars Hurt.
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    Bonking after an hour, anemia to blame?

    In the past I've been borderline anemic. I haven't been tested for a few years. When riding I seem to have less than an hour in my legs. After that I'm not out of breath and my legs don't burn that much, I just have no power in them.

    I've tried changing what I eat pre-ride and eat several hours before so that its been converted by the time I ride.

    I'm 6'6" 205lbs. Where I ride is hilly, several 10-18% climbs and your either going up or down. I've heard before that tall guys don't make good climbers so perhaps part of my problem is coming from the terrain.

    If I left anything out that would help answer this just let me know.

  2. #2
    AZ
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    How long have you been riding?

  3. #3
    Cars Hurt.
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    A decade in total but I only really got back into riding the last two years. In the last year I've ridden about 3k miles.

  4. #4
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    Try some science and go to the doctor for some blood work.

  5. #5
    Cars Hurt.
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    Had it done several times. Its costly and I've been a poor student for the last few years. I suppose my real question is if anemia can cause the problem im having.

  6. #6
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    Do you eat/drink anything in that hour?

  7. #7
    Cars Hurt.
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    About 20 oz water maybe less. Normally no food.

  8. #8
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    Bingo!
    You need to find something to eat that you can keep down after about 30 minutes of exertion; bars, gels, drinks(hammer). Not everyone needs this stuff this early in the ride but, as you have a predisposition to blood challenges maybe you are different. You may find that this helps pre-ride, too.

    When you get done riding you body is still going. Within 15-30 minutes you have something called a glycogen window. Feeding yourself at that time aids recovery.If you don't eat you will drain whatever you have at a hand, tapping yourself dry.

    Eat right after you ride. Guys here will recommend all sorts of stuff but stuff that goes right into the gut is best. Heavy food is tempting but takes too long to get into your system.

    1 Pint of Chocolate milk
    Yogurt
    Protein drink.

    Google:
    post ride recovery drink
    post ride food

    The other benefit of this sort of eating is that it takes the edge off of any subsequent hunger so you don't go and eat an extra large pepperoni pizza and a quart fo beer.

    20 oz of water? Dude, you're killing me.
    I don't rattle.

  9. #9
    Cars Hurt.
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    I bonk mid ride, 2-3 hour ride. Post ride I try to have some protien like peanut butter. Are you saying 20oz is too much or too little?

  10. #10
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    20oz is not very much depending on your intensity and the temperature, etc. You should probably be taking at least that much per hour. But the important point is that you need to take in some energy, primarily carbs, while you are riding. Water alone won't cut it after a certain length of time. Try sports drinks, gels, bars, PBJ sandwich, etc. Figure out whatever works for you, just keep in mind you need to get some calories *before* you start to bonk.

    That should keep you riding for longer periods of time. Then after the ride, take Berkeley Mike's advice for post-ride food to help you recover faster.

  11. #11
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    SIgh.....

    20 oz is not enough water for a 2 hour ride on the middle of summer. The correct amount of water to drink vaires individually but there are some basics that apply to most. First you should never get thirsty. If you feel thirsy you are already somewhat dehydrated and it can be very difficult to rehydrate while riding in the heat. Make a habit of taking a drink every 10 -15 minutes at least. Your stomach cannot absord water very fast during exercise so give it a little bit to work on consistantly. Drink early in the ride as well. If you are loosing weight during a ride you should be drinking more.
    Second Prehydrate. I like to drink 20 - 30 oz of water 45 min or so before a ride.

    If you have a history of low iron I would suggest you consider and Iron supplement. Low Iron levels can certainly cause drastic reductions in athletic performace. Remember that vitamen C increases the absorbtion of Iron so have an orange with your iron supplement or some strawberries with your steak.

    lastty I agree with the others that have said that low blood sugar is a very likely cause of your suffering. Alot of people describe If you are going to be out for more then an hour make sure you have a source of some sugar with you and ingest it early and often. I personally almost always drink a bottle of stong gatorade in the first hour of a mtb ride.

    Here is a book that might help you get a grip on what you should be eating.
    http://www.amazon.com/Sports-Nutriti.../dp/1931382964

    Also the Hammer nutrition is a great source of information. Just keep in mind that it is primarly a tool to sell product and a good resouce of information second.
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  12. #12
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    hammer says 16-24oz of water an hour, depending on conditions. I usually fall in that range and find it works best for ME. Everyone is different. I usually do 2 servings of gel an hour too.

  13. #13
    lgh
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    Bingo!
    You need to find something to eat that you can keep down after about 30 minutes of exertion; bars, gels, drinks(hammer). Not everyone needs this stuff this early in the ride but, as you have a predisposition to blood challenges maybe you are different. You may find that this helps pre-ride, too.

    When you get done riding you body is still going. Within 15-30 minutes you have something called a glycogen window. Feeding yourself at that time aids recovery.If you don't eat you will drain whatever you have at a hand, tapping yourself dry.

    Eat right after you ride. Guys here will recommend all sorts of stuff but stuff that goes right into the gut is best. Heavy food is tempting but takes too long to get into your system.

    1 Pint of Chocolate milk
    Yogurt
    Protein drink.

    Google:
    post ride recovery drink
    post ride food

    The other benefit of this sort of eating is that it takes the edge off of any subsequent hunger so you don't go and eat an extra large pepperoni pizza and a quart fo beer.

    20 oz of water? Dude, you're killing me.
    I'm with Mike. Do the post ride re-charge he recommends. It's really important. Drink MUCH more fluid on your rides and try adding some form of carbs - athletic drink or gels. But what is really important is to have your tank charged before the ride and the time to do that is immediately after the previous ride.

    Larry

  14. #14
    Cars Hurt.
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    Its a balmy 50-60 degrees where I live during most days so I don't sweat out as much fluid.

    I'll try your recommendations, thanks.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lets Try Science View Post
    Had it done several times. Its costly and I've been a poor student for the last few years. I suppose my real question is if anemia can cause the problem im having.
    Anemia is a killer...geez

    I lost a lot of blood two years ago, severe anemia was the result....took me two months to just begin to ride with any intensity...

    Gotta get that fixed up...

    I had too take 3 months of heme pills, that is iron organically bound in a heme molecule...

    You test positve for occult blood in stools, and the stools go dark black...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lets Try Science View Post
    In the past I've been borderline anemic. I haven't been tested for a few years. When riding I seem to have less than an hour in my legs. After that I'm not out of breath and my legs don't burn that much, I just have no power in them.

    I've tried changing what I eat pre-ride and eat several hours before so that its been converted by the time I ride.

    I'm 6'6" 205lbs. Where I ride is hilly, several 10-18% climbs and your either going up or down. I've heard before that tall guys don't make good climbers so perhaps part of my problem is coming from the terrain.

    If I left anything out that would help answer this just let me know.
    Anemia
    Are you dieting and trying to lose weight at the moment?

    You could always try taking some iron tablets to see if that helps with your energy levels. They're cheap and can work wonders sometimes. If you think that you may be anemic do you have any other signs? Are you tired all the time? Some symptoms to look at are these ones:

    http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/...naemiairon.htm


    In terms of your riding there are two major things to consider - your pacing during the ride and your pre-ride routine.

    Pacing
    If you don't pace yourself properly over the course of a hilly 3 hour ride then you're going to struggle. If you go out too hard at the start of the ride then you'll pay for that later on. What I'd suggest would be to ride slower and consciously parcel your effort over the entire ride. If you think that you're going too easily in the first hour then that's about right. Remind yourself that the workrate which seems effortless at the start won't be so easy towards the end.

    Along with keeping your overall effort at a sustainable level the aim of your pacing should also be to stop yourself from going too far into the red repeatedly. "Burning matches". Especially when riding offroad you have to be careful not to put in too many short hard efforts as there are only so many you can manage. A series of 10-18% gradient climbs is a good example of where you can benefit from taking it steady. Use the granny ring and twiddle up them in a low gear. If you're already using bottom gear then it's worth fitting some lower gearing so that you have the option to twiddle up them at less than maximum effort.

    By pacing yourself and riding at a lower intensity this should help you get further into the ride before tiring. Once you get fitter and feel able to get round the entire 3hr ride in one piece begin to lift the pace and intensity again. If you're feeling good start out steadily and then do the final 30-45min on the rivet.


    Pre-Ride Routine
    Your pre-ride routine can also make a big difference to how well you go. If you start the ride with low glycogen levels then you'll be struggling. You'll often see it advised to not eat for three hours before a ride but if you're just going out for a steady long ride (rather than a short intense race) then it's worth eating closer to the beginning of the ride also. It's vitally important to top up your fluid levels beforehand also, especially if you're riding in hot weather.

    An example of what I'll do for a training ride would be something like this:

    3 hours before the ride have a high carbohydrate meal. I'll often have four Weetabix with skimmed milk as it's easy to digest. Bananas are also a good food to eat as they're high in carbohydrate and iron.

    http://www.healthalternatives2000.co...ion-chart.html

    1 hour before the ride drink a 500ml protein shake

    30 min before the ride have a Quaker oats cereal bar whilst getting changed

    http://www.quaker.co.uk/on_the_go/pr...-bars/original

    5-10 min before the ride have an energy gel. Caffeine version if it isn't too hot, otherwise a non caffeine version on hot days.

    Immediately before you head out of the door drink 1-2 glasses of cold water. This helps hydrate you and the cold fluid also helps you stay cooler to begin with. If it's really hot then drink a slushie instead of water.

    http://fyiliving.com/diet/sports-nut...ing-endurance/

    During the ride use a carbohydrate energy drink, drink regularly and eat small amounts of food every 15-30 minutes to keep your energy levels topped up. I like Quaker oats bars as they stay in one piece and don't break up in your pockets. Some other good cycling foods are bananas, fig rolls and malt loaf. Energy bars and energy gels are much more expensive so I'll save them for special occasions only.

    When you drink instead of swallowing the energy drink straight away hold it on your mouth and swill it around. This is shown to make you feel less thirsty so that your drink lasts longer.
    Last edited by WR304; 07-25-2011 at 12:34 PM.

  17. #17
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    It sounds like you are just going to hard, most of the time. Do you use a Heart Rate Monitor? have you used the Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) scale before? Try to stay at a nice easy to moderate level of exercise for longer. That lower intensity will help you burn a greater percentage of fats then carbs, so you will not deplete the glycogen stores in your liver and muscles as fast. As people have pointed out Drink A LOT more water, I don't really care what temp you are exercising in sweat rates can be in excess of 2 L (67 oz) of water an hour, you need to replace that.

    in short ride at lower intensity for longer times then slowly increase your intensity and that should help. The nutrition information above is sound advise try some stuff out and see what works for you.

    if you are a university student go over to your Kinesiology department, or phys-ed department which ever it is where you are and see if you can be a participant in a study where VO2 is measured, they will usually give you that information.
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