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  1. #1
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    Beyond Training: Book By Ben Greenfield Good Recovery Chapters

    I came across a link to this book. It seems quite interesting, covering many different topics. The sections on recovery are worth a look through:

    Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health and Life By Ben Greenfield

    What Is Under-Recovery

    How To Know If Your Body Is Recovered

    How To Recover Quickly From Workouts

    Best Ways To Stop Stress

    Get Better Sleep

    How To Get Better Sleep Part 2

    Scroll down to the bottom of this page for links to all the different chapters which are available online:

    Beyond Training Book by Ben Greenfield

    The actual book is supposed to be released March 2014 on Amazon. I'm probably going to buy it.

    Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health & Life: Ben Greenfield: 9781628600124: Amazon.com: Books

  2. #2
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    Some good info within those links, and also some hideous bad stuff too. The recovery section in particular. It's hard to take the stuff seriously when acupuncture is top of the list for a recovery tool.

    Ben Greenfield also has some... different view on certain things on training which are paramount to, if not outright, snake-oil.

  3. #3
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    Beyond Training: Book By Ben Greenfield Good Recovery Chapters

    I think the recovery aids section was deliberately trying to look at different ideas and be a bit "edgy", rather than sticking to the conventional. I'd heard of a few of those things before but not all of them.

    The chapter I found most interesting was the one before on identifying how well rested you are. In particular this part from no.13 on Adrenal Fatigue Measurements.

    "2. Blood Pressure. Take and compare two blood pressure readings – one while lying down and one while standing. Rest for five minutes in a lying position before taking the first reading. Then stand up and immediately take the blood pressure again. If your blood pressure is lower after standing, then you can suspect reduced adrenal gland function – more specifically, an aldosterone issue, which is an adrenal hormone that regulates your blood pressure. The degree to which the blood pressure drops while standing is often proportionate to the degree of adrenal issues. If adrenal function is normal, your body will elevate your blood pressure in the standing reading in order to push blood to your brain (this is why overtrained athletes tend to get dizzy more often)." Ben Greenfield

    How To Know If Your Body Is Recovered

    One of my personal criteria for knowing when I'm overly tired and need to take a break from riding is when I feel dizzy when standing. When I'm too dizzy and not thinking straight I'll take some time off. Reading that made more sense of why that is.

    I did the adrenal fatigue test questionnaire in point no.1 of the same section too.

    Take the Adrenal Fatigue Quiz

    It could have been worse I guess.


  4. #4
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    I just skimmed over some of the links but from what I read all the training and recovery principals are sound, based in science. He has an interesting way of writing it down though to make it easy to read and not to bad to understand. Some of his recovery methods are interesting. There is science to them but he definitely praises the methods which work for him and boffs at the methods he doesn't have personal success with.

    The interesting thing that I saw was the fasting???? it goes against all that i understand about training and recovery, but the studies are there and make sense. The thing he doesn't explain is that it is short fasting, 10-12 hours ie sleeping. The studies on there own make good sense however the way he has written it could be misleading.
    Rocky Element
    My Attempt at a Blog

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post

    "2. Blood Pressure. Take and compare two blood pressure readings – one while lying down and one while standing. Rest for five minutes in a lying position before taking the first reading. Then stand up and immediately take the blood pressure again. If your blood pressure is lower after standing, then you can suspect reduced adrenal gland function – more specifically, an aldosterone issue, which is an adrenal hormone that regulates your blood pressure. The degree to which the blood pressure drops while standing is often proportionate to the degree of adrenal issues. If adrenal function is normal, your body will elevate your blood pressure in the standing reading in order to push blood to your brain (this is why overtrained athletes tend to get dizzy more often)." Ben Greenfield

    How To Know If Your Body Is Recovered
    Interesting.

    While recently looking back at my past year, I have been suspecting that I was overtrained for much of the year....as I would often get very light headed (to the point of nearly seeing complete blackness for a second or 2) when I would stand up quickly from the office chair or from lying down watching TV or something. It would happen a lot. I suspected it had something to do with very low blood pressure from training a bunch but never though much more about it.

  6. #6
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    Beyond Training: Book By Ben Greenfield Good Recovery Chapters

    The main bits on fasting include Step 6 here:

    How To Customize Your Diet

    This Dr John Berardi link is an overview of the different intermittent fasting methods and well worth a read through. There are several different ways to approach intermittent fasting, some apparently more successful than others:

    Precision Nutrition » Intermittent Fasting TOC

    "I’ve become a fan of periodic intermittent fasting, for me. In particular, I liked the weekly fast (coupled with an “eat what I want” day). And I really benefited from the daily fast approach too. For my clients? As always, each person is different. Nutritional age (how much a person knows about nutrition, and how well they can apply that knowledge) plays a huge factor in my recommendations. I wouldn’t give a Level 1 client (who’s just learning the basics) the same advice I’d give to a Level 3 client like myself. (For more on nutritional age, see the references section at the end of the book.) My recommendations also depend heavily on lifestyle. In my own experiments, and in my work with clients, I’ve found that the dieting approaches outlined in this book are more successful when:

    - you have a history of monitoring calorie and food intake (i.e. you’ve “dieted” before);
    - you’re already an experienced exerciser;
    - you’re single or you don’t have children;
    - your partner (if you have one) is extremely supportive; and,
    - your job allows you to have periods of low performance while you adapt to a new plan.

    On the other hand, these programs seem to be much more challenging for those who:

    - are new to diet and exercise;
    - are married and have children;
    - have performance oriented or client-facing jobs; and,
    - compete in sport/athletics.

    In addition, women seem to fare worse on the stricter forms of intermittent fasting than men do; for women, I recommend beginning with a very relaxed approach to fasting or avoiding it altogether."
    Dr John Berardi

    http://www.precisionnutrition.com/in...ting/chapter-7

    --------------------------------------------

    In the Ben Greenfield links there are also sections on dietary composition advocating low carb, high fat diet for endurance athletes (eg: 20% carbohydrate, 65% fat, 15% protein).

    "If you eat mostly carbs, your body will run on mostly carbs.

    If you eat mostly fat, your body will run on mostly fat."
    Ben Greenfield

    How Much Carbohydrate, Protein and Fat You Need

    He does add that when doing longer sessions and high training volume you need more carbohydrates though (30-40% carbohydrate).

    When it comes to dietary advice I have a habit of reading various books on the subject, going "oh, that's different" and then continuing with what I normally eat which probably isn't a fantastic diet but is stable. The problem with getting too obsessed about cleaning up your diet, making fundamental changes, cutting out the processed junk etc, is that it introduces complexity and sacrifice. At that point you're then into the territory of fad diets and creating routines that may work for a bit but are hard to stick to long term that you'll likely lapse from at some point in the future. When you lapse you're then back at square one again.

    Edit: This Dr John Beradi quote is a good one:

    On “clean” food vs. “junk” food.

    "Let’s be clear. I didn’t go for pizza and wings regularly. I really do prefer eating lean meats, loads of colourful veggies, and more natural, unprocessed carbohydrates, and I eat this way 90% of the time. It’s much more physique- and health-friendly to eat real, whole foods most of the time.

    Yet I’m also careful not to let orthorexia – a psychological term for developing a fixation with healthy or righteous eating – sneak into my lifestyle. Yes, food quality is on a continuum and some foods are “higher quality” than others. But it’s not an all-or-nothing, “good” versus “bad” thing. Using “healthy” or “unhealthy” to qualify food choices isn’t all that useful. In some cases, it’s downright confusing.

    Most importantly for this book, occasionally eating “lower quality” food won’t likely harm your physique or health. Just don’t eat too much of it, too often.

    Bottom line: If you ever choose to follow an approach like this, make sure you eat high quality foods most of the time, while allowing a little latitude too. Of course, you don’t have to eat “junk food.” But do allow yourself to have a few “whatever you want” meals after working out.

    Just be sure to follow the rest of the rules. Get enough protein, some carbs, some veggies, don’t eat too much relative to your own needs, and don’t eat so much that you make yourself sick. You’ll feel terrible (especially if your stomach is used to going without food for long periods), and it won’t help your progress or health."
    Dr John Berardi

    http://www.precisionnutrition.com/in...ting/chapter-6

    -------------------------------------------------------

    I've never actually had bloodwork tests done like the ones that Ben Greenfield lists to specifically evaluate fatigue levels from training. Chances are the results would look fairly bad. In the US you can have them done directly but in the UK you have to go through a doctor first apparently.

    I have been taking some enforced time off from riding this week, due to catching a cold after riding in the rain on Wednesday. I usually try and go to bed to sleep for a few hours to recover and warm up after a wet ride in winter but didn't get the chance on Wednesday, which is looking like a mistake now. I was fairly stuffed anyway (probably due to a poor diet... ) but catching cold was the main reason.
    Last edited by WR304; 01-18-2014 at 03:45 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    as I would often get very light headed (to the point of nearly seeing complete blackness for a second or 2) when I would stand up quickly from the office chair or from lying down watching TV or something. It would happen a lot. I suspected it had something to do with very low blood pressure from training a bunch but never though much more about it.
    It's my understanding that this is due to low blood sugar levels. It means you don't have enough calories in your body. Time to eat. Again, that is my understanding.

  8. #8
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    Beyond Training: Book By Ben Greenfield Good Recovery Chapters

    Quote Originally Posted by jcm01 View Post
    It's my understanding that this is due to low blood sugar levels. It means you don't have enough calories in your body. Time to eat. Again, that is my understanding.
    There's a little about that earlier in the chapter:

    Third Stage: Exhaustion

    "At this point, your body’s ability to cope with stress has been depleted. Your adrenal glands are simply unable to continue to produce cortisol in response to stress, and because cortisol is necessary for a base level of alertness and awakeness, and for your liver to churn out sugar-based energy, you begin to suffer from constant exhaustion. Blood sugar levels plummet, and this leads to further intolerance to stress, increasing mental, physical and emotional exhaustion, and a state in which pretty much the only way for you to make it through the day is through excessive use of caffeine-based stimulants, sweets or sugary energy drinks, along with carbohydrate-rich foods such as such as starches and candy – all of which can cause a temporary spike in energy levels that “do the job” of cortisol." Ben Greenfield

    How To Know If Your Body Is Recovered

    For months at a time I can ignore the fatigue from riding and keep it under control. Regular meals and snacks eaten throughout the day (and several times a night) keep me going. Sore legs can be ridden out, even if I feel like death first thing. The "brain fog" of fatigue is constantly there but I'm used to it. It's a case of bluffing your way through at work despite not thinking clearly.

    Although that's ok for a while it doesn't last indefinitely. With overreaching and overtraining what I've found is that I tend to reach a tipping point. One day I wake up and that's it, the roundabout has stopped and there's nowhere to hide. All the pills and sugary foods in the world can't pick me up anymore. Dizziness is one of several symptoms whilst being generally rundown but it's crushing. I usually have sore legs for ages afterwards too. Waking up after a week completely off the bike and still having sore legs. It then takes a few weeks to gradually pull back from the brink, followed by vowing not to repeat the same mistake again, until next time...

    This chart shows my riding days September 2013 through to 19 January 2013 (green is turbo training, red is riding outdoors), starting from no riding after a year off due to my broken leg. I had three days rest in a row mid November but that was about it as I was motivated. January 2014 was a bit scruffy and catching a cold was the final straw. You'd think I'd have learnt by now.


  9. #9
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    I put myself into a pretty big hole last year, which led to me taking close to 3 weeks off in July. The sleep problems and frequent colds just became too much to ignore. It mentally tough to take time off like that, but my sleep was much improved. First race back I was stale and didn't do so great. The race after that I had my best finish, ahead of guys I had yet to beat. Coincidence? I don't know, but the improved sleep alone was worth it

  10. #10
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    Beyond Training: Book By Ben Greenfield Good Recovery Chapters

    The adrenal fatigue section in the Ben Greenfield book is largely based on this article:

    "Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome is not a medical condition recognized by mainstream institutions, and for good reasons. Invariably, the adrenal glands are structurally normal. Low cortisol, the most common associated finding, may be caused by factors outside the adrenal glands.

    Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome should not be confused with another medical condition called Addison's disease where the adrenal glands are not functioning according to conventional endocrinologists' standards. While Addison's disease is often caused by an auto-immune dysfunction, Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome is largely caused by stress or by a host of other factors, including dysregulation of the HPA Axis, nervous system problems, immune system problems, and metabolic-nutritional problems.
    ...

    Signs and Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue

    - Tendency to gain weight and unable to lose it, especially around the waist.
    - High frequency of getting the flu and other respiratory diseases and these symptoms tend to last longer than usual.
    - Tendency to tremble when under pressure.
    - Reduced sex drive.
    - Lightheaded when rising from a horizontal position.
    - Unable to remember things.
    - Lack of energy in the mornings and in the afternoon between 3 to 5 pm.
    - Feel better suddenly for a brief period after a meal.
    - Often feel tired from 9 - 10 pm, but resist going to bed.
    - Need coffee or stimulants to get going in the morning.
    - Cravings for salty, fatty, and high protein food such as meat and cheese.
    - Increased symptoms of PMS for women; periods are heavy and then stop, or are almost stopped on the 4th day, only to start flow again on the 5th or 6th day.
    - Pain in the upper back or neck with no apparent reason.
    - Feels better when stress is relieved, such as on a vacation.
    - Difficulties in getting up in the morning.
    - Lightheaded.

    Other signs and symptoms include:

    - Mild depression
    - Food and or inhalant allergies
    - Lethargy and lack of energy
    - Increased effort to perform daily tasks
    - Decreased ability to handle stress
    - Dry and thin skin
    - Hypoglycemia
    - Low body temperature
    - Nervousness
    - Palpitation
    - Unexplained hair loss
    - Alternating constipation and diarrhea
    - Dyspepsia

    If you have many of these signs and symptoms, and you have ruled out other organic pathologies, it is time to consider Adrenal Fatigue as a possible cause. None of the signs or symptoms by themselves can definitively pinpoint Adrenal Fatigue. When taken as a group, these signs and symptoms do form a specific Adrenal Fatigue syndrome or picture of a person under stress. These signs and symptoms are often the end result of acute, severe, chronic, or excessive stress and the inability of the body to reduce such stress. Stress, once a "basket" term used by physicians to explain non-specific symptoms, undetectable by conventional blood tests, is not a mystery to the body at all."
    Dr Michael Lam

    Comprehensive Adrenal Fatigue Article - DrLam® - Body. Mind. Nutrition®

    I've included in that quote the first part as doing a quick Google search for "does adrenal fatigue exist?" includes some relevant links to look at. It's not as clear cut as it first sounds.

    This Chicago Tribune article for example:

    An exhausting battle over adrenal fatigue

    "Adrenal fatigue" is the sort of diagnosis that might hit home during a late-night Internet search. Do you, for example, have trouble waking up in the morning without caffeine? Do you crave salty foods? Do people seem a lot more irritating than in the past?

    If so, it could mean your adrenal glands are underperforming because of illness or constant emotional or physical stress, according to some medical practitioners who suggest patients make dietary and lifestyle changes in response — as well as take supplements they frequently sell.

    But those who diagnose adrenal fatigue or exhaustion are fighting an uphill battle for legitimacy, even as the terms gain traction in alternative health circles and among Americans seeking a solution for chronic and unexplained fatigue, depression, weight gain and malaise.

    The disorder is not recognized by most conventional endocrinologists or internists, major medical associations and even integrative medicine pioneers such as Dr. Andrew Weil, who reject the idea that excessive stress weakens the adrenals and causes health issues.

    "Adrenal fatigue is a worthless diagnosis, and lavish testimonials and anecdotal claims of marked improvement following some intervention are most likely fraudulent or transient placebo effects," said Dr. Paul Rosch, president of the American Institute of Stress and a clinical professor of medicine and psychiatry at New York Medical College.

    Other critics say there is room for further study. Endocrinologist Seymour Reichlin, an expert on the brain-endocrine system and stress, doesn't believe in adrenal fatigue but says "it's not unreasonable to carry out lab tests because the symptoms of adrenal fatigue overlap with true adrenal insufficiency."

    According to the adrenal fatigue theory, modern life is so relentlessly stressful that the walnut-size adrenal glands, which produce hormones needed to cope with stress, get overworked and peter out. If you're tired for no reason, get lightheaded when you stand up quickly, can't shake colds or infections and feel as if you're constantly walking uphill, you may have something going on at the adrenal level, proponents say.

    Supporters say the condition differs from adrenal failure (or adrenal insufficiency) and from extremely low adrenal function (Addison's disease), which are usually caused by an autoimmune reaction, a tumor, cancer or an infection such as tuberculosis.

    "The adrenals aren't failing, as in Addison's. They aren't destroyed as in an autoimmune issue. They simply can't keep up with the demands placed on them," said James Wilson, an Arizona-based naturopath and chiropractor who coined the term in 1998 and has written what some call the definitive guide for patients. "We know all organs do that," Wilson said. "But for some reason, medicine has resisted the same concept with adrenals."

    Skeptics say it's true that prolonged stress can enlarge the adrenals and disrupt almost all the body's processes because of the constant flood of adrenaline and cortisol coursing through the body. But they say there's no gray area on adrenal function — the glands either work or they don't.

    They say evidence has not shown that prolonged stress results in the adrenals producing less cortisol. Moreover, many symptoms linked to adrenal fatigue, including feeling tired, depressed, irritable or unable to concentrate, could be caused by dozens of things, including stress, fractured sleep, poor nutrition and a lack of exercise.

    And they say doctors who sell supplements to treat adrenal fatigue should raise a red flag for patients.

    "Is adrenal fatigue real? Yes and no," said Dr. Brent Bauer, director of the complementary and integrative medicine program at Mayo Clinic. "Like many things in this arena, it's a grain of truth surrounded by a lot of hype and peddlers of quick fixes."
    Chicago Tribune

    Chicago Tribune

    .

  11. #11
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    Beyond Training: Book By Ben Greenfield Good Recovery Chapters

    3 REASONS WHY CALORIES DON’T REALLY MATTER

    "Earlier, you learned how to count your calories and log your diet the right way. But it’s important to realize that it’s the nutrient density and quality of your food that truly matters – not the calorie content." Ben Greenfield

    How Much Carbohydrate, Protein and Fat You Need

    I wanted to quote that as I came across a blog post which offers a fascinating and thought provoking counterpoint, especially when you consider the popularity of diets where you cut out certain foodstuffs and types.

    "First I want to talk about what I consider to be one of the most disturbing aspects of the fad diet industry, because it is relevant to the discussion I want to have about Adrenal Fatigue. That aspect is the claim that ‘calories don’t matter’. There is a strong aversion to discussions about calories in the fad diet industry, and there are some valid reasons for this. The trend away from a focus on calories and toward a focus on food quality is not inherently negative, food quality is important, and can make a HUGE difference in health and weight loss outcomes. The focus on food quality is also good from a policy and social perspective, as improving the food system will have far reaching positive effects on our health, economy and environment. The focus on food quality is good!

    However, a lot of gurus have taken this to an extreme and created a mythology that calories are irrelevant, and counting, tracking, or otherwise being aware of calories is dumb. Sometimes this works, as there is certainly a category of people for whom simply improving diet quality will lead to improved health and weight optimization. Unfortunately there is also a a rather large category of people for whom a hyper-focus on food quality, and a resistance to acknowledging the relevance of calories, can, and DOES, have a disastrous effect. And it’s probably not the group you think I’m going to talk about.

    Many of the people who find themselves drawn into novel dietary philosophies are those with a long history of weight fixation, restrictive eating, and a generally disordered relationship with food and eating. These people have lost the ability to accurately gauge their hunger and satiety signals, and they are usually conditioned to feel guilt and shame for eating. Imposing further dietary restrictions on these people, as most dietary philosophies do, while ALSO telling them that calories don’t matter and counting calories is dumb, leads inevitably to a situation I’m seeing more frequently in my practice: people existing in a state of chronic semi-starvation. They may fill their plates up with protein and vegetables (ie, low calorie, highly thermogenic foods) and believe they are eating ‘a lot’, but they are, in reality, shorting themselves of the calories their bodies need in the order of hundreds or even thousands of calories a day.

    I recently saw a picture on facebook of a health personality’s breakfast. It was one egg, a few bites of meat and a small serving of vegetables. The person who posted the picture claimed that this was enough food to get them all the way to lunch, because it was ‘nutrient dense’. This is true, the food on the plate was nutrient dense, but when I calculated the calorie content of the meal it worked out to less than 300 calories. The human body does not run on nutrients, it runs on calories. We need nutrients to support repair, keep us healthy, synthesize hormones, etc, but our bodies expend energy supporting the processes of life (digestion, heart beat, brain activity, etc), and our bodies expend energy through physical activity and exercise. The energy our bodies use is measured in calories, and calories matter. We know they matter when you’re getting too many, but they especially matter when you aren’t getting enough, when your body is using more energy keeping you alive than you’re consuming through food. And one of the things I’m seeing more and more is people literally starving themselves in the pursuit of optimal health, and receiving reinforcement for it from their gurus and friends because they’re eating the ‘right’ foods and not counting calories.
    ...
    What I’m seeing is a high correlation between dietary restriction (and I’m referring specifically to food group and macronutrient restriction here, not calorie restriction, although one almost inevitably leads to another, even if unintentionally) and Adrenal Fatigue diagnosis. In my practice, I’m beginning to see more and more clients who come to me already having been diagnosed with Adrenal Fatigue and placed on a supplement protocol by an alternative health practitioner. Because ensuring adequate calorie intake to support physical activity is part of my training and philosophy, I frequently have these clients do a 3 day food log, and what I’m finding, over and over, is that these people are consuming starvation level calories (the WHO defines starvation as anything less than 2100 calories a day for men and 1800 a day for women). The quality of their diet is pristine, they are certainly not lacking for nutrients! But they’re starving. I convince them to eat more, maybe add back in some foods they’ve been convinced are ‘unhealthy’ (like oatmeal, fruit, and other energy dense foods), and suddenly their symptoms begin to resolve.

    Am I saying Adrenal Fatigue doesn’t exist? Not necessarily. These people are certainly ill. And there are likely other factors that can contribute to these symptoms. What I am saying, though, is that there are an awful lot of people out there who are restricting themselves into illness, and there are an awful lot of gurus who are encouraging this behavior through hyper-focus on food quality and dismissal of the relevance of calories. It is irresponsible. For some people, perhaps MANY people, simply increasing calorie intake is the first and most important step toward recovery. Distressingly though, the Adrenal Fatigue treatment protocols I see being sold on the internet rarely address adequate calorie intake, and in fact frequently discourage any attention to calorie intake while also imposing further dietary restrictions on people who already eat restrictive diets. This is a huge mess people! We’re moving the wrong direction! We should be increasing the variety and richness of our diets whenever possible, and ensuring that our bodies are getting not only the nutrients but also the calories necessary to support our activity and a healthy weight."
    GoKaleo.com

    Adrenal Fatigue as a Cover for Starvation | Go Kaleo

    .

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