Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 149
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rob_co2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    563

    Is base training dead?

    Not sure if this has been posted before or not, did a search and nothing came up. Interesting thought.

    http://ezinearticles.com/?Is-Aerobic...ad?&id=2162016
    A couple of years ago I proposed some radical ideas on cardio training for mountain bikers. Ever since then I've had a lot of people doubt my sanity. Aerobic base training has been a staple of training programs for decades and many an off season program for mountain bikers has included an extended period of time reeling off boring miles on a trainer. While some people embraced my concepts (and proceeded to achieve better "aerobic endurance" despite doing little to no aerobic training) many others have questioned why this concept is so different that the "scientific" one.

    Let me explain why this is - people in the strength training trenches figure out what works in the real world (which is MUCH different than a controlled lab setting) and then implement it. Sometimes what we do flies in the face of the traditional "science" of training. Sports scientists pick up on what we are doing, study it and then tell us why it works. This process usually takes about 5-10 years or more to go from the cutting edge in the trenches to being taught in the classroom.

    So, this meant that there was not a ton of scientific studies to confirm what I knew - aerobic base training simply does not work on a consistent basis in the real world. But, now there are two landmark studies that suggest that anaerobic interval training is vastly superior to the out dated models still being promoted by the mainstream fitness media.

    The main reason that mountain bikers felt compelled to include aerobic base training in their program was to increase their aerobic capacity. The scientifically accepted method to determine aerobic capacity is VO2Max (Maximum Volume of Oxygen Consumed), which is an indicator of how well your body can utilize oxygen. Aerobic training had been shown to increase your VO2Max, so therefore was considered necessary for overall cardiovascular development.

    However, strength coaches on the cutting edge realize that the best way to raise your VO2Max, and therefore your aerobic capacity, is through interval training, not aerobic training! While this may not make a lot of sense, it is true. Several recent studies on anaerobic intervals produced some of the largest increases in VO2Max ever seen, including studies done on aerobic training.

    One study in particular was done on what is popularly known as the Tabata Protocol. This method calls for 20 seconds of sprinting followed by 10 seconds rest and these mini-intervals are repeated 6-8 times per round. A workout may involve 1-3 rounds (complete recovery is allowed between rounds). Researchers found massive increases in the subjects VO2Max in addition to the anticipated increases in anaerobic endurance markers. The increases in VO2Max were some of the largest ever seen in a study and showed that aerobic training is not the only (nor the best) way to increase aerobic capacity.

    Another landmark study that came out in the September 2006 Journal of Physiology studied the effects of 20 minutes of interval training (30 second sprints followed by 4 minutes of rest) vs. 90-120 minutes of traditional aerobic heart rate zone training. They found that the interval group which did only 1 hour of exercise per week had the same improvements in aerobic capacity as the aerobic group. Did I mention the aerobic group spent 4-6 hours per week exercising?

    4 to 6 times as much exercise to get the same results in aerobic capacity? This isn't even taking into account that the interval group improved their anaerobic capacity, something the aerobic group did not. This finding is astounding and shows just how much time you can waste with aerobic training.

    I've mentioned this before and here is the proof - anaerobic intervals will increase your aerobic capacity as well as your anaerobic capacity but aerobic training does not increase your anaerobic capacity. All of this means that if you have limited training time (and who doesn't) you may be wasting your time with aerobic training. Anaerobic intervals are the only way to maximize the effectiveness of limited training time.

    Also, there is no evidence at all that you will burn out or get injured by training with intervals year round. This is simply a myth that has been told so many times that it has been taken as the truth. I challenge anyone to find me a single study that backs this claim.

    What has been found is that going straight into hard training (either strength or intervals or aerobic) without a preparatory period will increase the likelihood of injury. So, like everything else, you must work into full blown hard core intervals and cycle their intensity and duration but there is no reason you can not do intervals year round.

    Now, just to balance this out, there are 2 times when aerobic training has a place in your program. First, if you are so out of shape you can not tolerate even the easiest intervals then you should spend some time doing aerobic training to build your work capacity up a bit. But once you can do intervals you should make the switch.

    Second, aerobic exercise is great for active recovery (something I have also mentioned before). Going out for a light 20 minute jog or ride will help to flush blood into the muscles and help you recover from your strength training and interval sessions faster. Outside of these 2 things, though, aerobic base training may be dead.

    My mission in life is to bring our sport into the 21st century. You can get better results in aerobic capacity in less time while also increasing anaerobic capacity. This should be something that mountain bikers everywhere rejoice at because aerobic training is some of the most tedious and boring stuff around.

    The MTB Strength Training System is the world's only strength and conditioning program for the unique demands of mountain biking. Riders from around the world have discovered how they can climb faster, descend with more confidence and have more fun by upgrading the engine that drives their bike - their own body!

    Find out more about this unique program and how it can help you enjoy riding more by visiting http://www.mtbstrengthcoach.com
    While you are there you can find out how to sign up for a free sneak peak at The Ultimate MTB Workout Program, complete with a free workout.

    Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_P_Wilson

    Sounds like solid stuff. I guess the main issue I have is that one of the studies compares 1 hour anaerobic to 4-6 hours aerobic. What about races who do 30 mile races, or what about training 10+ hours per week, would you only need to do 2 hours anaerobic to match that? Anyway, its an interesting article.

  2. #2
    Giant Anthem
    Reputation: 2fst4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    701
    I read this article last winter and cut out easy base miles and devoted more training time to mimic the intensity of racing-it's worked well for me this season. With this said I think James website is very helpful to a point but doesn't address the whole picture for XC racing.
    Racing and Training Blog
    http://dirtandgears.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    251
    With this said I think James website is very helpful to a point but doesn't address the whole picture for XC racing.
    He does mention this a couple of times in respect to endurance MTBing, that his programs and way of thinking will not totally address the riders needs and that you will need extra mileage/time to cope with that part of the endurance equation. They should do for those riding DH, 4X , shorter MTB races and any recreational-type rider.

    I personally agree with what he says. Recently I did a 65 km 'enduro-type' event with no extra mileage (even cut down on it) and had been following James reasoning and finished in the top 50 (out of 600 riders). Would of been 13th if I had not had two punctures ( .

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    366
    Most people who do short races overtrain. High intensity in various forms is great. My opinion (huge FWIW) is that if your race is 2+ hours long I think you'll need base training. And that threshold could very well even be 1 hr, but I feel pretty sure about 2+ hrs. Note base training should shift during your season, many do more in the beginning and less as the season progresses.

    I worked out with some of the first people to figure this stuff out in late 80s (this stuff being what is in the article). I was with one guy who worked out something like a half hour a day and was ranked top 10 in the US for his age group at 18 in an event that was shorter than 30 seconds. I could do laps around him if the event were 5 minutes or longer - the rest of us put in around 20 - 30 hrs per week depending, but he beat all of us in the super-short events at 30 minutes a day of training... Damn sprinters!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: stevemtu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    728

    base miles=weight control

    I know that the concepts presented above are mostly true for me. I cannot be close to race form without doing substantial interval work above LT. However, long hours in the saddle below LT have two benefits (1) it's fun and (2) weight control.

    Most coaches who have a base component in the training program do so because they believe that it prepares the body to endure (and respond to) high intensity intervals. I am not sure I have seen anything indicating that this philosophy is incorrect.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    1,393
    I'm not ready to throw out decades of coaching experience in endurance sports based on what I see there alone. Sure we make advancements, but that is one guy commenting and it appears that article is also a little bit of an advertisment.

    My understanding of base training--and I've read a lot of stuff on exercise physiology as it applies to endurance athletes--is not that it is designed to increase VO2 max. You do VO2 max intervals for that purpose.

    The studies I've read suggest base training does the following:

    1. Over time it increases the size of mitochondria in our cells (the mitochondria are essentially the "engines" or powerplants of our cells--bigger mitochondria means a bigger engine);
    2. It increases the number of capillaries which carry blood to our muscles;
    3. It improves our body's efficiency in terms of converting oxygen and fuel (such as gylcogen) into energy so we get more out of what our cardiovascular system can deliver to our muscles;
    4. It starts to increase our muscle's ability to store the all important glycogen (critical for extended hard efforts and very long races); and
    5. It prepares our muscles, tendons, and ligaments for more vigorous training so that we can handle it without injury and overtraining.

    I read an article just a few years ago about a weight training program for football players and was surprised to learn they have their own "base training" in the weight room. Their yearly plan started with moderate weights with higher reps and multiple sets. For example, they were doing 2-3 sets of 10-12 reps as a base phase of training to prepare their muscles for later training. Once the base phase was complete, they then moved into heavier lifting that included much heavier weight, lower reps (1-5), and multiple sets (up to 5 or even more).

    I don't think base training is dead by any means. I do understand advancements are made all the time in our understanding of training and the physiology behind it, but time honored and proven principles probably shouldn't be dismissed too easily.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,989
    Base training is definitely dead for me. I completely skipped base training this season. However, I spent the winter doing very focused, sweet spot training with lots of intervals. My average training was 3.5 hours per week (all of it indoors on the trainer or spin bike). Even during the Ontario Cup race season my average training is only 7-9 hours per week.

    In many ways I was forced to come to this approach by my work schedule and my physical limitations (too much training and insufficient recovery gets me into injuries). My fitness does not suffer greatly from lack of base training and long hours in the saddle.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by serious
    Base training is definitely dead for me. I completely skipped base training this season. However, I spent the winter doing very focused, sweet spot training with lots of intervals. My average training was 3.5 hours per week (all of it indoors on the trainer or spin bike). Even during the Ontario Cup race season my average training is only 7-9 hours per week.

    In many ways I was forced to come to this approach by my work schedule and my physical limitations (too much training and insufficient recovery gets me into injuries). My fitness does not suffer greatly from lack of base training and long hours in the saddle.
    One thing to consider is that you still have the base from all the previous years of 7-9 hours/week. Perhaps any or all of us who have been riding for years could take one off-season and focus on Tabita or other types of high-intensity training and see results.

    I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just curious to know if you can "get away with" that number of hours for a second consecutive off-season.

    How many hours/week do you think you'll get in this off-season?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,989
    I plan to do 3-4 hours this winter as well and basically maintain most of my fitness. I will ramp up a bit before race season starts to get closer to my peak. The rest comes during the race season and I tend to peak towards the end.

    What is important to remember is that I am 47 years old and just your average sport rider, with no expectations of massive improvements and podium placing.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,915
    cut out base miles if you like, but realize that it is a step backwards. training plans for runners used to entail primarily "intervals", that ideology was challenged and overcome by Lydiard. although it is a different sport, the training principles apply.

    http://lydiardfoundation.org/pdfs/al_training.pdf

    periodization works. low intensity training has it's place. intervals are awesome and need to be utilized. of course we aren't all olympians that train full time... so compromises are made.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,297
    Periodization (and therefore base training) are not dead. After all, it's how the world champions in all major endurance sports train.

    The myth that base training consists of nothing but endless hours of mindless super-easy plodding, however, is dead.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: millennium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    332
    Of course base training doesn't increase VO2Max as much as training near your VO2 max (with shorter, max effort intervals) will increase your VO2 max--it doesn't take a study to figure that out (at least in my mind). Just like running doesn't improve your cycling as much as cycling will improve your cycling.

    Also, Expert and above will have a hard time being competitive without some longer rides in their program. It's easier to avoid longer rides (and still be competitive) at Sport and Beginner levels.

    Finally, it all depends on individual strengths and weaknesses--someone with a good endurance base to begin with (maybe from years of riding or from other activities) can more easily avoid longer rides and still be competitive.
    -

    Addictive website!

    TwoWheelTweets.com

    All of cycling's twitter tweets in one place!

    -

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by whybotherme
    cut out base miles if you like, but realize that it is a step backwards. training plans for runners used to entail primarily "intervals", that ideology was challenged and overcome by Lydiard. although it is a different sport, the training principles apply.

    http://lydiardfoundation.org/pdfs/al_training.pdf

    periodization works. low intensity training has it's place. intervals are awesome and need to be utilized. of course we aren't all olympians that train full time... so compromises are made.
    Excellent points. Runners who are trying to be competitive or shoot for a PB tend to put a lot of focus on gradual increases in mileage ( I run miles, but bike km, weird, eh?) and consistency in training. Although there will always be "programs" telling them they can succeed on 3 days/week (usually with over half the weekly distance in one long run), experienced runners know that without the base they can't reach a peak.

    Cycling is differnet in that we can put in more weekly hours without injury and recover more easily from harder efforts. Talk about good news/bad news....sounds good, except it applies to your competition too!

  14. #14
    No. Just No. Moderator
    Reputation: Circlip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    4,619
    Quote Originally Posted by flargle
    The myth that base training consists of nothing but endless hours of mindless super-easy plodding, however, is dead.
    IMHO it's not as much of a "myth" as it is a "misunderstanding". Base training should be taken as referring to building one's aerobic capacity and aerobic efficiency/economy, the 2 being different but interrelated qualities. These qualities can be addressed with training at a wider variety of intensities and durations than simply LSD work. Somehow, the concept has become bastardized over the years, probably because many people do adopt a high LSD component to their base training (which makes perfect sense and achieves good results for some) to the point where base training is synonomous with LSD in many people's minds, which isn't the case. LSD can be a component, or even the foundation of base training, but base training can also be accomplished without LSD.

    There's usually more than one solution to any problem when it comes to training.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: drexlerkm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    158
    Quote Originally Posted by Gatorback
    I don't think base training is dead by any means. I do understand advancements are made all the time in our understanding of training and the physiology behind it, but time honored and proven principles probably shouldn't be dismissed too easily.
    +1

    A sobering and neutralizing comment. Train like you play, play like you train.

    I'm much more interested in the physiological science behind the training; less interested in "this study had X participants. One group sat on their fat asses and ate donuts (control group) but another sat on their fat asses and ate donuts and picked their noses and saw AMAZING RESULTS IN NO TIME AT ALL!"

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Yeti2424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    317
    Quote Originally Posted by HSCoach2
    One thing to consider is that you still have the base from all the previous years of 7-9 hours/week. Perhaps any or all of us who have been riding for years could take one off-season and focus on Tabita or other types of high-intensity training and see results.

    I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just curious to know if you can "get away with" that number of hours for a second consecutive off-season.

    How many hours/week do you think you'll get in this off-season?

    IMHO this is the “million dollar” point. Years of base training will provide an athlete in any sport the foundation to improve with more “advanced” training in the future. I have seen this in the weight room with athletes who have been doing the same program for years and have hit a plateau. We make changes to their program and then the majority of them see improved results very quickly. Did the new program make them better? Not really. It was the change in programming and the body’s reaction to it caused the plateau breakthrough. However a new trainee would not necessarily have the same reaction to the same program because they did not have the years training a solid base from which to build up from.

    Point being is that if we have two groups of cyclists who most likely have similar training backgrounds in a traditional base building style. If one group continues training this way while the other group changes up their training I would think that the cyclist training differently would see performance advancements purely based on the body’s reaction to the different stimulus. A better study would be to compare cyclists who have only performed interval training their entire cycling careers to cyclists who have gone through the traditional base building training over the course of many years. Good luck finding that sample though.
    Retribution Fitness: Strength, Power, and Purpose
    General fitness workouts posted daily.

  17. #17
    BBW
    BBW is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BBW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,179
    I don't have the patience or will to read the whole thing but got enough with 1/3...
    Its funny how people that write articles like the one posted by the OP, miss so many points and try to make everybody with little knowledge think that he is revolutionary and that something like base training should be dumped

    It would be funny to see how in the world you would start doing intensity work without being prepared for it???
    Have you seen a sedentary person doing intervals? how many do you think that person can handle? how is that person going to feel next day? 3 days later?
    As Gatorback said, what about tendons and ligaments? are they prepare for high intensity work?

    Intensity IS what increases your VO2max but it should be done in a periodized way and there is no magic formula. Depends on your training status and fitness level, goals, genetics, psycologic factors, etc
    Can you do high intensity work all the time: NO
    can/should you do base work all the time: NO

    Exercise is stress so you have to stress your system in order to induce adaptations (stronger, faster, etc) but if you push too hard you will overtrain or get injured and if you don't push yourself no adaptation will occur...

    There is a TON of scientific evidence that supports this but when you have people that only thing about how to sell whatever, they push stupid stuffs without the basic principles; then newbies try to do it since they don't know what is right or wrong and end up getting injured, overtrained or something else.....

    0.02$

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,989
    I did not mean to imply that I have no long rides in my program. I need a few long rides in the 3-4 hour range as I prepare for 8 hour races. But I do that prior to the long race, not prior to the start of the season, so it is not base training in the traditional sense.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  19. #19
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,451
    There are many way to skin a cat.

    The idea behind changing the way you train as the season progress (periodization) is to stress your body in a different way. After training the same way for a length of time you are not improving anymore.

    If you are out of shape, or haven't done any long rides, a 3hr ride at 75% MHR is quite challenging. More than enough to overload you aerobic system. Do a couple of those followed by some rest and you will see improvement. After a while that ride will not be sufficient to induce a training effect; you need to vary the length and intensity to continue to improve.

    Skipping the base phase allows for a rapid progression to near race fitness. But how will you vary your training to allow progression during the season?

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    592
    Lmn,
    What do you suggest for progression later in the season.
    I beleive I do a form of base training by doing a lot of BC skiing (Dec.-May) and then ride my bike medium effort for about two weeks(March/April 20-25 hrs) and start adding intensity after that. Do you just add variety to your interval sessions? and/or does switching up bikes give enough change to help w/progression like SS v. big squishy bike v. hard tail? I use my big bike early for lots of miles and abuse, then race bike, and move on to the SS in the fall. I do not know if I get stronger but I feel like it.
    Just curious, Thanks.
    Ryon
    ATV = fat A$$

  21. #21
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,451
    Quote Originally Posted by butryon
    Lmn,
    What do you suggest for progression later in the season.
    I beleive I do a form of base training by doing a lot of BC skiing (Dec.-May) and then ride my bike medium effort for about two weeks(March/April 20-25 hrs) and start adding intensity after that. Do you just add variety to your interval sessions? and/or does switching up bikes give enough change to help w/progression like SS v. big squishy bike v. hard tail? I use my big bike early for lots of miles and abuse, then race bike, and move on to the SS in the fall. I do not know if I get stronger but I feel like it.
    Just curious, Thanks.
    Ryon
    The quality of your base training really depends on what your skiing depends on. If you are DH skiing at resorts then you really aren't doing any training for cycling (unless you are doing non-stops top to bottom at Revelstoke but few can do that on a regular basis). If you are ski touring then you probably have a huge endurance base, but are lacking a bit in your high end. If you are doing nordic then you are probably are at a very high fitness level and trying to transfer that fitness to the bike.

    What ever you are doing for skiing 20-25hrs is a huge number to start riding with. I would be temped to start riding a bit earlier but do a little, actually a lot, less volume.

    How to progress during the season really depends on your strengths and weakness. However 95% of all mountain bikers are limited by aerobic power, much more then road racing, aerobic power is the key ability for MTBing. Most are best served by focusing on the aerobic engine.

    Workouts such as
    -4hr at 70-75% MHR
    -3x20 minutes @80-90%
    -5x7 minutes @90-100%
    -5x4 minutes @best effort

    all work on your aerobic system. The key to continually improving your aerobic system is to do a workout that stresses it enough that it forces adaptation. Too often people get a favorite workout and get stuck in routine. Mixing these workout up can really help.

    Progressing during a season is actually very are hard to do. Most either come into the season at a high fitness level and then try and maintain or they come into the season out of shape and improve through out it. It takes a very good program and a motivated athlete to come into a season fit and then improve as season progresses.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,915
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN
    Progressing during a season is actually very are hard to do. Most either come into the season at a high fitness level and then try and maintain or they come into the season out of shape and improve through out it. It takes a very good program and a motivated athlete to come into a season fit and then improve as season progresses.
    Preach on brother man!!!!! Wish I had some of your expertise for setting up the lady's training!

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    592
    I probably miss communicated the hrs. I do, roughly 20-25 hrs, every two weeks. Depending on my work schedule I get anywhere from 10-15 hrs a week. I do DH ski but the time I count toward training time is only the hiking/backcountry time. I will hike before the resort opens for roughly two hrs and then ski lift served for about two hrs...off to work. the weekends will give me more hike time with some of my trips being upwards of four hours. Do you see a time when a mtb'er would do shorter harder intervals than the above mentioned 4 min. ones?

    "Progressing during a season is actually very are hard to do. Most either come into the season at a high fitness level and then try and maintain or they come into the season out of shape and improve through out it. It takes a very good program and a motivated athlete to come into a season fit and then improve as season progresses."

    I agree with this completely. I don't really get out of race shape much but I also only seem to get a bit faster each season. I think this is due to better technique riding not necessarily the training.

    thanks
    ATV = fat A$$

  24. #24
    Giant Anthem
    Reputation: 2fst4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    701

    MHR formula

    Quote Originally Posted by LMN
    Workouts such as
    -4hr at 70-75% MHR
    -3x20 minutes @80-90%
    -5x7 minutes @90-100%
    -5x4 minutes @best effort
    LMN-Do you mainly do these on the road? AND...is the MHR based off of the 220-age formula?
    Racing and Training Blog
    http://dirtandgears.blogspot.com/

  25. #25
    No. Just No. Moderator
    Reputation: Circlip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    4,619
    Quote Originally Posted by 2fst4u
    LMN-Do you mainly do these on the road? AND...is the MHR based off of the 220-age formula?
    Can't speak for LMN, but the general answer for determining MHR is Noooooo! do not derive from a formula for this purpose. Results from formula to actual are materially different for enough people that it's not so helpful for this application.

    You can try to search for different protocols on the web for determining maximum HR, but here's one possibility;

    - Progressive warmup for 20-30 minutes, including a couple of "openers" about 5 minutes before the test, with the openers beign relatively hard efforts 30-60 seconds each.

    - Find a medium grade hill, probably paved (MTB OK for this) or else off road with good traction and lack of obstacles so that you can focus on pure physical output, with hill duration being at least 3 minutes for you from bottom to top.

    - Start test, with very hard effort for approx. 3 minutes or whenever you are start seeing black spots, falling over, etc.

    - Cruise back down, for total rest duration (i.e. light spinning) of about 2 minutes.

    - Hit another hill rep of 3 minutes. You should feel like you're pretty much going to die by the end of the 2nd rep, but if not...

    - Rinse lather, repeat for 1 more time for a 3rd reps. If you're still upright by that time you haven't gone hard enough.

    - Ideally you'd be wearing HR monitor that you can look to see your max value on later so that you're not trying to stare at your watch while doing reps.

Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •