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  1. #1
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    Any Issues with Yeti ASR?

    I am looking into getting an ASR. I have read many threads from people who love them. My question is how durable are they? I weigh 200 with gear on. I am worried about the rear carbon triangle not lasting. If I were to get this bike does it need to be treated like a dedicated race bike or can the bike be subbed in as my trail bike replacing my Rush. Just some questions. I have played around with the idea of getting a Pivot Mach 4 that could probably be my everyday bike as well as the race bike so any feedback would be helpful.

  2. #2
    Don't be a sheep
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgarcia0816
    I am looking into getting an ASR. I have read many threads from people who love them. My question is how durable are they? I weigh 200 with gear on. I am worried about the rear carbon triangle not lasting. If I were to get this bike does it need to be treated like a dedicated race bike or can the bike be subbed in as my trail bike replacing my Rush. Just some questions. I have played around with the idea of getting a Pivot Mach 4 that could probably be my everyday bike as well as the race bike so any feedback would be helpful.
    I race one and weigh 150lbs. At 200lbs I'm not sure I would recommend one to you, they are light, pushing the envelope of what's possible with with that Aluminum front triangle. I personally feel a little bit of lateral flex that might be too much for someone at your weight. The Pivot would be a good choice becuase It's built more robustly (heavier) and I've heard it's very stiff.
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  3. #3
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    I agree w/ Rivet, and would be more worried about the thin walled alum frt triangle than the rear carbon! One thing you might want to look into is the warranty on the frame based on your weight. If you want to try a cheap one, I am selling my frame or whole bike pretty cheap.
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  4. #4
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
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    breakage

    I've only seen one rear triangle come apart, and it was an out of the box mfg issue. I have seen the front triangle crack at about the same rate as any other bike out there. Basically no atypical problems to speak of on the alloy bike.

    The point here is that they probably won't break, but they will flex. I'm 170 lbs and could flex my bikes around like crazy. Both the rear and the front will twist when you put power down and when on techy terrain, especially at your weight.

    The new models coming out are a ton stiffer, but the elimination of the flex point in the rear leads to less small bump compliance and will hurt the suspension IMO.
    Last edited by used2Bhard; 10-26-2009 at 10:39 AM.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    I've only seen one rear triangle come apart, and it was an out of the box mfg issue. I have seen the front triangle crack at about the same rate as any other bike out there. Basically no atypical problems to speak of on the alloy bike.

    The point here is that they probably won't break, but they will flex. I'm 170 lbs and could flex my bikes around like crazy. Both the rear and the front will twist when you put power down and when on techy terrain, especially at your weight.

    The new models coming out are a ton stiffer, but the elimination of the flex point in the rear leads to less small bump compliance and hurt the suspension IMO.

    That's what I thought till rode one out in Vegas the small bump compliance is actually better the shock is working more since seat stay's don't flex. I was really impressed how well both the asr and asr-5 are about 30% better then last year

  6. #6
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    I'm 175 and ride a large '09 ASR-SL which I built up this summer. I did a few east coast races and put in tons of trail time on some very rocky techy terrain and so far it's been excellent. Flex hasn't been an issue for me- when locked out it feels like my hardtail only lighter. Maybe if I could put down a few more watts it would flex to the point of being a problem but I'll save that one for the 2010 race season... If flex is an issue for you, they have a full carbon frame for a few more bucks that's supposed to be tons stiffer.

    Good luck with your decision!

    PS- what's the deal with the 2010 ASR-SL? website has the carbon ASR only, no alummy version and Jenson.com has the '09 frames on sale big-time!
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  7. #7
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    Used...

    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    I've only seen one rear triangle come apart, and it was an out of the box mfg issue. I have seen the front triangle crack at about the same rate as any other bike out there. Basically no atypical problems to speak of on the alloy bike.

    The point here is that they probably won't break, but they will flex. I'm 170 lbs and could flex my bikes around like crazy. Both the rear and the front will twist when you put power down and when on techy terrain, especially at your weight.

    "The new models coming out are a ton stiffer, but the elimination of the flex point in the rear leads to less small bump compliance and hurt the suspension IMO.
    "

    Have you ridden the new ASR5 and ASRc with the new rear triangle? If not I do not understand how you could know that the new rear triangle would result in a reduction in small bump compliance? I would love for you to clarify this observation.

  8. #8
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
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    ...

    Quote Originally Posted by barrows
    "

    Have you ridden the new ASR5 and ASRc with the new rear triangle? If not I do not understand how you could know that the new rear triangle would result in a reduction in small bump compliance? I would love for you to clarify this observation.
    2 of my friends with jillions of miles on all things ASR rode the new rear end and told me that is was stiff as heck, accelerated like a HT, tracked beautifully, but gave up some compliance on small bumps. It could have been a set-up issue?

    The Yeti design relies heavily on the pro-pedal to avoid bobbing (it has always run the stiffest factory settings in the RP23), which by it's nature gives amazing acceleration, good efficiency, but hurts small bumps. With a stiffening in the rear, the only thing that could improve things is the new shock (which I hear is a beauty!) It's a simple fact that the flex in the rear end also softened things up a bit.
    Last edited by used2Bhard; 10-26-2009 at 10:37 AM.
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  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the input guys. Basically what i have read is that if I do end up with one I need to treat it with care like any dedicated racer I guess....thanks again.

  10. #10
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    FWW I got the float (non propedal RL) on my '03 asr tuned at PUSH. The result is a shock without a lockout, but also zero bob and I can't tell that its any less bump compliant than before. I'm not a big fan of fooling with lockouts anyway, so it works well for me.

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