Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12

    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike

    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 2182
Size:  36.2 KBAero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike-image.jpgDoes this sound practical to any of you? Aero bars and bar ends on an XC bike? I have a 2011 Fuji Nevada 1.0 29'er. I do a lot of cross town commuting and, as I live near the beach, hit a lot of headwind. My 29'er is a bit tall for me, and I've tried riding with elbows on the bar, which I feel very comfortable with. Bar ends are for technical terrain.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,660

    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike

    There are a few possible combinations that you could try.

    You can have two sets of bar ends, one set in the middle of the bars and one on the outside, a set of full tri bars with bar ends on the outside, an integrated aero bar such as the Bontrager trekking bar or even just some tri bar arm pads with no aero bar.

    Of those a full tri bar potentially gives the most aerodynamic position. The main thing to consider is the added weight of a full tri bar on your handlebars however (450g or so for an alloy clip on), which affects the handling, and how much you will use them. You can get lightweight carbon clip on bars but they're expensive.

    http://www.triradar.com/gear/best-tr...bars-review/5/

    Aero bars are no fun in heavy traffic or strong crosswinds. If you're not tucked in on them then there's no benefit to be had.

    I had a set of Bontrager Satellite Trekking bars on my Epic for a while. They were good when I was using them, but what I found was I didn't use the aero extensions as much as expected. Anywhere offroad, plus road climbing, descending, crosswinds and heavy traffic were all areas that I didn't use them. I wound up going back to a more traditional Ritchey Superlogic 10D flat bar instead.

    http://bontrager.com/model/04996


  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: plantdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    590

    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike

    Look into the Jones H-bar. This is a way better alternative for the mtn bike. Lots of hand positions, and the forward bar section allows you stretch out, not unlike you would with a TT bar. You can't really run bar ends however, as the sweep would make for an odd angle. But with some ergon grips, there's plenty of meat to grab when you're standing and cranking.

    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike-imageuploadedbytapatalk1372082396.288874.jpg

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,660

    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Lyonx View Post
    My 29'er is a bit tall for me, and I've tried riding with elbows on the bar, which I feel very comfortable with.
    I meant to add. From your picture you should be able to lower the handlebars on your bike quite a bit. In the picture there is a stack of spacers underneath the stem, which you can remove and place above the stem, lowering the handlebars.

    You can undo the stem and flip it over too, so that instead of pointing up the stem points down.

    Those adjustments will give you a lower front end, which will make your riding position a little more aerodynamic also.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    I meant to add. From your picture you should be able to lower the handlebars on your bike quite a bit. In the picture there is a stack of spacers underneath the stem, which you can remove and place above the stem, lowering the handlebars.

    You can undo the stem and flip it over too, so that instead of pointing up the stem points down.

    Those adjustments will give you a lower front end, which will make your riding position a little more aerodynamic also.
    Thanks for the input! I can't stand those spacers. I have almost no stand over hight, so that will help compensate.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike-image.jpgAero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike-image.jpg
    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike-image.jpg

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    And the ride; the ride is so sweet. Aero bars conquer the windy Southern California flats, bar ends tackle the many hills, and Kenda Small Block Eights roll sweet as hell on pavement. As for the mountain, I have yet to see.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,660
    Cool.

    Does it feel better with the lowered handlebar? After refitting the stem and spacers did you make sure that the headset is properly adjusted, so that it turns smoothly without any free play?



    The brake and gear cables look like they may be catching on the tri bars. Can you turn the bars 90 degrees easily left and right without any interference from the cables?

    When riding on tri bars you have to be even more wary of unexpected hazards ahead than normal. Your hands are a long way from the brake levers, slowing reaction times, and the riding position makes it harder to steer quickly in an emergency also. It's best to try and anticipate what's likely to happen. If in doubt be cautious and switch back to the normal hand position, covering the brakes again well beforehand. In heavy traffic and when riding close to other cyclists it's safer to stay off the tri bars too.
    Last edited by WR304; 06-24-2013 at 05:26 PM.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    The cables interweave through the aero bars nicely. No interference while turning; However, the cables force me to tilt the shifters up. I barley knew the difference when I rode 10 miles today. As for lowering the handlebar, I had no problem. I ditched one spacer and stacked the rest on top, because the tube coming up from the fork was too long. Flipped the stem no problem. Thanks for your help with that, that helped me so much.

    I'm really aware of my surroundings while I'm on the road. When I am coming into a situation where brakes may be needed, I put my left hand back on the straight bar on the front brake. This position also allows me to check my left side and rear for traffic. In addition, I can still support my weight on my right elbow. I have almost full control, and and easily move my right hand back to the bar in a hurry.

    What do you think?

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    Forgot to mention. The elbow rests block my gear indicators on my shifters. I don't see a way around it, there may be none. Ill have to get used to keeping track of gears in my head. The downside is that it distracts me from the road.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,660

    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike

    Riding on tri bars is something that you get better at with practice. I'd start off being overly cautious to begin with. Tri bars are like anything. Used well they're good but there are some situations where you're much safer with both hands on the handlebars.

    When approaching a situation where brakes may be needed having two hands on the handlebars is far more stable and easy to control. If you have to brake hard with the front brake, whilst one arm is still on an arm rest, your weight distribution is quite forwards. Lots of front brake with your weight over the front of the bike is a recipe for locking the front wheel and going over the bars.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    Yeah I'll have to watch out for the weight thing. Any ideas though, about the shifters?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    497
    Quote Originally Posted by Lyonx View Post
    Forgot to mention. The elbow rests block my gear indicators on my shifters. I don't see a way around it, there may be none. Ill have to get used to keeping track of gears in my head. The downside is that it distracts me from the road.
    I can't speak for everyone, but I think most of us think that the indicators are a joke and a waste of space and are just extra weight. For the most part if I want a harder gear I select to a harder gear and if I want an easier gear I select to an easier gear. Sometimes I run out of gears (in both directions) and sometimes I cross chain. I'm not too worried about it. If I run out of gears then I just either deal with it or switch my front ring if I am on a bike that has a FD.

    If your derailleurs are set up correctly you shouldn't have to worry about dropping chains and running the RD into the spokes.

    You should be able to get a feel for the bike and know approximately where you are at in the cassette based on cadence, speed, and RPE.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    I make 8.10 an hour and go to school. I can't afford to cross chains and ruin my drivetrain. Unless crossing is not as bad as I'm thinking it is.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    Ill be fine without those indicators though.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    497
    Hmmmm....If you are running a 3x system (which it looks like you do) then that will have the worst cross chaining. From big to big and little to little. That should be pretty easy to feel and take care of when you are doing that and just don't do it. I feel that a 2x system mitigates the cross chaining a decent amount and yea, if you are planning on climbing a long steep hill you want to be in the small and if you are going fast you want to be in the big. It's pretty easy. A 1x sytem you are going to cross-chain. That is just how it was made.

    As far as the wear and tear and likelihood of issues. I think it's a little exaggerated. People will bring up Andy Schlecks chain drop and list how you should change gears and how fast things are going to wear out.

    For the most part I feel that having a bike decently tuned up and clean and oiled/greased in the right spots will go a long ways. Things will eventually wear out and need to be replaced with good chainline or bad chainline. I doubt anyone has any actual evidence on longevity.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,660

    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike

    Shimano offer inline gear indicators, which would be visible from the tri bars:

    http://www.ebay.com/bhp/shimano-gear-indicator

    A lot of mountain bikes and most road bikes don't come with gear indicators, so it's a useful skill to be able to decide when to change gear purely on feel. A quick look down at the drivetrain will tell you what gear you're in if needed but with practice you hardly ever need to look after a while.

    Cross chaining isn't too bad overall. Modern chains can handle it without breaking or excessive wear. The main combinations to avoid on an MTB triple are big chainring/ largest rear sprocket (chain tension is highest), middle chainring/ smallest rear sprocket (chain tension is usually too low), inner chainring/ smallest two rear sprockets (chain tension is usually too low). I'll use the rest without any concerns.

    When riding you'd usually aim to anticipate what chainring and rear sprocket will be needed ahead of time. Changing front chainrings tends to break up your pedalling rhythm and cost speed, so front shifts need to be planned in advance for minimum disruption. If possible easing off slightly on the pedals as you change chainring gives the smoothest front shifts. Easing off on the pedals as you shift chainring reduces the chance of derailing the chain under load also.

    If you're coming up to the beginning of a steep hill you'd try and shift down a chainring just before reaching the steepest section (not as you begin the steepest section, that's too late), so that the shift is done smoothly, whilst simultaneously doing multiple rear upshifts onto smaller sprockets to maintain your speed. By doing that you then start the climb with your front shifting done and you're in a smallish rear sprocket, meaning that you only need to do rear sprocket shifts and you have most of the rear sprocket range available to down shift as needed on the climb.

    If you were aiming to sprint off the traffic lights or get a good start in a race you'd do the opposite. Stay on the largest chainring but before you stop shift right down to the next but one largest sprocket on the rear. As you accelerate away from the start the gear is easy enough to be straight up to speed at maximum revs, there's no need to change chainrings and all you have to do is keep hitting the upshift trigger for a higher gear as you spin each gear out in turn.

  18. #18
    Rock and/or Roll
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    439
    Have you considered using drop bars instead? Maybe the Salsa off-road drops? I ride a road bike as well, so drop bars for me would feel natural and offer a comfortable aero position.

  19. #19
    Bro Mountainbiker
    Reputation: Sheepo5669's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    3,502
    Look at tour divide setups! Many use bar ends and aero bars. Mainly for comfort.
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    Oh nice! That's exactly what I have.
    Aero bars and forward facing bar ends on a 29' XC bike-image.jpg
    "The sport is about the finer things in life"

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    12
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 1463
Size:  74.7 KB
    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669 View Post
    Look at tour divide setups! Many use bar ends and aero bars. Mainly for comfort.
    Where can I get bags like these
    "The sport is about the finer things in life"

  22. #22
    Time to go farther
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,318
    On-One Lurcher SS
    Speedway Cycles Fatback Ti SS
    1984 Trek 560
    http://slipangles.blogspot.com/ - It's supposed to be fun

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 10-29-2012, 05:22 AM
  2. Thule load bars: rapid aero bars worth it?
    By Ilikemtb999 in forum Car & Biker
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 09-07-2012, 12:43 PM
  3. Seatpost facing forward
    By robncircus in forum Videos and POV Cameras
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-15-2011, 08:24 PM
  4. Anyone Riding With Aero Bars?
    By Solomon76 in forum Commuting
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-13-2011, 04:47 PM
  5. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-11-2011, 05:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •