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  1. #1
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    0 degree rise stem w/ riser bars VS. 5 degree rise stem w/ flat bars

    Quick question. Assuming that the bars are the same length and have same sweep..is there any diff. here? Just wondering why someone might chose one over the other...

    Scenarios:
    A. 90mm 0 degree stem + riser bars that raise grip height up approx. 1/2"

    VS.

    B. 90mm 5 (maybe 10?) degree stem that raises grip height up approx. 1/2" + flat bars
    Last edited by rydbyk; 11-22-2009 at 07:02 PM.

  2. #2
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    I prefer flat bars because I tape the center section and use it on smooth flat sections. But I might just be weird
    read KNOBBY MEATS or be sadly ignorant of the mediocrity that is allowed to exist in the interwebs

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk
    Quick question. Assuming that the bars are the same length and have same sweep..is there any diff. here? Just wondering why someone might chose one over the other...

    Scenarios:
    A. 90mm 0 degree stem + riser bars that raise grip height up 1/4"

    VS.

    B. 90mm 5 (maybe 10?) degree stem that raises grip height up 1/4" + flat bars
    A riser bar will raise grip height more than 1/4" (that is only 6mm).

  4. #4
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by MessagefromTate
    A riser bar will raise grip height more than 1/4" (that is only 6mm).
    Guess I should have measured, but the same question still stands....riser bars vs. high degree stem....what's the diff...

  5. #5
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    One setup uses rise in the bar, the other uses rise in the stem. Flat bars have more room to mount computers and lights. Other than that theres not much of a difference. What are you trying to figure out?
    read KNOBBY MEATS or be sadly ignorant of the mediocrity that is allowed to exist in the interwebs

  6. #6
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by the munts
    One setup uses rise in the bar, the other uses rise in the stem. Flat bars have more room to mount computers and lights. Other than that theres not much of a difference. What are you trying to figure out?
    Advantages/Disadvantages is all. You have a valid point about more bar space to run comps and lights. I have noticed that most XC guys do not run riser bars....instead a degree stem with flat bars...

    I do know that a lot of XC guys run zero deg or neg stems and I understand this concept.

    What I don't quite get is what I mentioned above...other than more room for comps and lights, I was wondering why someone who races XC might choose to run a 5 or 10 deg stem with flat bars vs a zero degree stem with low rise bars...

  7. #7
    LMN
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    There is more to bars and stems then rise and reach.

    Width, back sweep, and up sweep are important factors. Risers typically offer more of each then a flat bar.

  8. #8
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    XC riders tend to like a lower front end on their bike and therefore gravitate to flat bars with a stem with low rise or inverted stem. Flat bars provided they have the right backsweep and are at the right height are generally perceived to have more hand positions because the controls can be slid along the bar more readilty away from where you want to put your hands on the flats. Many don't like their shifters and brakes too close to the grips including me. All said, you can get a handlebar up much higher with a riser bar and why they are popular. For many a bike is more comfortable with the bars up higher which is easier to achieve with a riser handlebar. A 5 degree increase in stem angle will only raise the bars by just under 9 mm's for a 100mm stem length. That isn't much. Easier to achieve more rise with a change in handlebar rise.
    Hope that helps. Lance Armstrong rides with both a riser bar and riser stem to get his Trek Fuel 9.8 (size large) Bonty CF riser handelbar height about the same as his saddle.
    Last edited by dirtrider7; 11-23-2009 at 03:47 PM.

  9. #9
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    It is all about bar ends. Bars ends on riser bars look a little silly to some folks . .. . that is why I use a flat bars.
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  10. #10
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
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    bars

    As far as fit, only sweep, width, and height matter. As you said, height can be adjusted by the stem and spacers. Sweep and width are the important variables then.

    I like wide bars and alot of sweep. Therefore only a riser or lowriser will work for me as the widest flat bar still doesn't get there. I find the width helps me for stability, descending, and comfort. The sweep keeps my wrist and hand fatigue down as it's a more natural position. and yes, I run Ergons with the carbon bar-end on my lowrisers.
    Free will is an illusion, people will always choose the perceived path of greatest pleasure.

  11. #11
    Hike it or Bike it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk
    Quick question. Assuming that the bars are the same length and have same sweep..is there any diff. here? Just wondering why someone might chose one over the other...

    Scenarios:
    A. 90mm 0 degree stem + riser bars that raise grip height up approx. 1/2"

    VS.

    B. 90mm 5 (maybe 10?) degree stem that raises grip height up approx. 1/2" + flat bars
    You can use any combination of goodies you want to as long as the end result gets the bar where you prefer to have it. A lot of flat bars are narrower 560-580mm in width which many prefer for slicing through the tight tree lined courses. By the time you trim down riser bars to that width, there isn't much real estate left for mounting grips, shifters and levers between the bend of the rise. But if one likes a more open width, plenty of bars in flat and riser to take care of everyone. Mate it with a stem that gets the bar where one wants it and presto - fit is dialed. Who cares if it is what bar with what stem if the end result is the same?

  12. #12
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    Can we see...

    ...how it looks? BTW, I am in the midst of selecting handlebars for the new ride and I'm gonna go with wide flat bars w/Ergon GX2 grips, and adjust the rise via stem/spacer combination. Only variable I did NOT account for is sweep (up and back), wonder how that affects handling?

    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    I run Ergons with the carbon bar-end on my lowrisers.

  13. #13
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    If you get the same hand position with either one, choose a flat bar over a riser. A riser, due to its geometry, needs more reinforcing, which makes it heavier than a flat bar of similar width.

    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    I like wide bars and alot of sweep. Therefore only a riser or lowriser will work for me as the widest flat bar still doesn't get there. I find the width helps me for stability, descending, and comfort. The sweep keeps my wrist and hand fatigue down as it's a more natural position. and yes, I run Ergons with the carbon bar-end on my lowrisers.
    Did you have a look at the Salsa Pro Moto carbon flat bar ? It comes at 660 mm, with a back sweep of 5, 11 or 17 deg.
    The handlebar I'm currently using is 580 mm wide with 5deg bend; as I use bar ends on it, the actual width is 550 mm or so. It doesn't help me too much with all the technical descents here.
    I am looking for something wider, but flat: the stem is already upside down (-6 deg), so I can't afford to put a riser bar - it will bring the grips above the seat. The Salsa handlebar I've mentioned above is the only one that's wider than 620mm with more than 5deg of back sweep. I'm concerned that 11 deg of back sweep might be a bit too much, but I can't find any wide flat bar with 9deg or less. I forgot to mention that the stem - handlebar interface is 25.4, which doesn't give me many options.

  14. #14
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    Hypothetical Question: Let's assume you can get your hands at the exact position (compared to each other, the ground, the BB and the seat) and the same angle (i.e. up sweep, back sweep, etc.) with two different set-ups: (1) flat bar with a stem that angles up and (2) riser bar with a stem that is flat. (I know, I know, people have already said it is very difficult, if not impossible, to get the same hand position and angle--but just assume it is possible for a minute.)

    Is the feel different between the two? I'm thinking that because they will lever differently against the fork (because they attach to the fork differently, using different stems), they will feel different and/or one will lever more effectively or easily against the fork. Any thoughts?
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  15. #15
    ups and downs
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    Keep in mind that if you take a big flat bar with something like an 11 degree sweep, you can rotate it upward so that when viewed from above the sweep is reduced and when viewed from the front, the bar will sweep up. It can be thought of like a vector sum. By starting with a 11 or 15 degree very wide flat bar you should be able to get them into the same range of back and upsweep as a riser bar.
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  16. #16
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    riser bars give you more control in technical and actually allow for more leveraged power transfer when climbing (seated or standing) assuming you can still get the bar to be lower than the saddle (which I didn't have a problem with). That having been said, I still think they look and feel a little funky on a XC bike (but I've been running once since switching to a Niner rigid carbon fork).

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