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  1. #1
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    So You Wanna Teach Your Girlfriend or Wife How to Mountain Bike?

    I hate posting links for stuff I wrote, but shredchic said I should. So I blame her

    It's some (snarky) advice for men who want to get their sweetie into mountain biking, but I think the women will enjoy it more

    So You Wanna Teach Your Girlfriend or Wife How to Mountain Bike? | MTB4Her
    MTB4Her.com: mountain bike site for women, by women

  2. #2
    pin it
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    Good article Stripes. Thanks for posting
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  3. #3
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    I'll be sure to follow these steps as my wife did just recently ask about joining me on a ride

  4. #4
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    Never happens..

    Nice! Made me smile.Thanks for the post.

  5. #5
    see me rollin, they hatin
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    lolled at this:

    9. Tell her what to do constantly (“Lay off the brakes!”) because she clearly needs good advice. Girls like getting yelled at while they’re trying to survive their first ride.
    fap

  6. #6
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    Love this. My first mountain bike ride was very similar, though it was my own '96 edition hardtail (in 2009) with crappy forks, and a ride up Canyon and Marsh trails at Annadel. "We used to ride this all the time on rigid bikes..."

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christieland View Post
    Love this. My first mountain bike ride was very similar, though it was my own '96 edition hardtail (in 2009) with crappy forks, and a ride up Canyon and Marsh trails at Annadel. "We used to ride this all the time on rigid bikes..."
    My joints just hurt thinking of riding Annadel on anything but at least 4" of cush. Ouch.

    Thanks for the compliment. I need to get up there for a ride sometime soon.
    MTB4Her.com: mountain bike site for women, by women

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    This was too funny and I just had to share it with other ladies..

    www.facebook.com/midwestwomensclinic

    Cheers!
    ~Tania Juillerat
    Founder & Director
    Midwest Women's Mountain Bike Clinic
    www.midwestwomensclinic.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by thines View Post
    This was too funny and I just had to share it with other ladies..

    www.facebook.com/midwestwomensclinic

    Cheers!
    ~Tania Juillerat
    Founder & Director
    Midwest Women's Mountain Bike Clinic
    www.midwestwomensclinic.com
    Thanks Tania

  10. #10
    Dudette
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    Great piece, Stripes! I was lucky enough to enjoy my first mtb ride with a guy who "got it" and despite having to use one of his bikes, he took the time to make it fit me as best as he could. He was super patient and very encouraging. Despite falling several times, I fell in love that day. Bought my first hardtail and took a class. I've been hooked ever since!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    Great piece, Stripes! I was lucky enough to enjoy my first mtb ride with a guy who "got it" and despite having to use one of his bikes, he took the time to make it fit me as best as he could. He was super patient and very encouraging. Despite falling several times, I fell in love that day. Bought my first hardtail and took a class. I've been hooked ever since!
    Thanks Petey

    It sounds like you were one of the lucky ones When I started riding, I was riding solo. I was bored in NC, and it seemed like something interesting to do in 1992. Matter of fact, until I was riding for 2-3 years in, the all of my rides where solo. I didn't get the first time experiences I wrote about, but definitely received several earfuls about it from others as well as watching it first hand on the trails from other riders.

    Funniest story (not for the poor girl), but for me and my husband was watching two guys blow past us uphill, with the girl not far behind. My thoughts "yeah whatever, people need manners." As it turns out, the guys didn't stop long waiting for her at all, and she looked like she was on a bike that was in need some of serious wrench time, and you could tell it wasn't fitted for her (seat was slammed all the way down so she could ride it). And then we watched her struggle downhill.

    Later on, we saw her flying down the fireroad by herself looking VERY unhappy. My husband said: "Yeah, that relationship isn't going to last long."

  12. #12
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    I was lucky! Unfortunately my friend has since moved west and I no longer get to ride with him, but we still talk bikes a lot. I have witnessed what you described, however, and sometimes I'm quick to butt in and offer my opinion. Like one woman, in particular, was just learning and kept getting pressured by her husband to switch to clipless pedals. Well, she simply wasn't comfortable with the idea. He was trying to tell her that she couldn't climb without clipless pedals. She pointed to me (they had joined us for a group ride for the first time) and stated I was riding flats. He made some comment about I should switch over, too. Uh huh. Well...that was the final straw. I responded back that I HAVE clipless pedals, and HAD ridden them for years, but felt like it was actually hindering me in some ways (in regards to learning the proper technique) and that yes, it's a different technique, but didn't feel that I NEEDED to have clipless pedals to climb well, or enjoy myself. It's fine to have your own opinion, but don't try to belittle or bully someone into trying something they clearly are not comfortable with. Let someone come to their own conclusions, when they are more experienced and confident.

    Anyway - am I to understand you've written other articles as well on MTBforher? I really enjoyed the one about "My Grom Coach", too!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    I was lucky! Unfortunately my friend has since moved west and I no longer get to ride with him, but we still talk bikes a lot. I have witnessed what you described, however, and sometimes I'm quick to butt in and offer my opinion. Like one woman, in particular, was just learning and kept getting pressured by her husband to switch to clipless pedals. Well, she simply wasn't comfortable with the idea. He was trying to tell her that she couldn't climb without clipless pedals. She pointed to me (they had joined us for a group ride for the first time) and stated I was riding flats. He made some comment about I should switch over, too. Uh huh. Well...that was the final straw. I responded back that I HAVE clipless pedals, and HAD ridden them for years, but felt like it was actually hindering me in some ways (in regards to learning the proper technique) and that yes, it's a different technique, but didn't feel that I NEEDED to have clipless pedals to climb well, or enjoy myself. It's fine to have your own opinion, but don't try to belittle or bully someone into trying something they clearly are not comfortable with. Let someone come to their own conclusions, when they are more experienced and confident.
    Oh, I looove hearing those "You should ride clipless because of blah.." One of the faster riders I know rides flats. And she's even convinced her husband to go to flats. For me, it was a mental thing. After ACL surgery, I just didn't like being attached to my bike. After that, my confidence soared.

    If you wanna ride clipped in, great! I'm not stopping you. Just don't ask me to join in your fun. Lemme do things my own way.

    The latest one I've been hearing is how I should go to 29ers. Yes, because riding a 33.3 lb 160mm travel bike with big balloony 2.3 tires isn't challenging enough But I like going downhill--having a bike that's confident downhill makes it worth it for me. I don't need a 29er (or any other wheel size) to enjoy my mountain biking.

    Anyway - am I to understand you've written other articles as well on MTBforher? I really enjoyed the one about "My Grom Coach", too!
    Thanks Yep, I'm a regular there (even posted a video of me crashing), and that's my latest one. Glad you liked it.. I haven't gotten much feedback about it at all, so it's nice to see that people like it.

  14. #14
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    agreed on all counts Petey.

    nothing like making somebody unconfortable to make them hate the sport!
    fap

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    Oh, I looove hearing those "You should ride clipless because of blah.." One of the faster riders I know rides flats. And she's even convinced her husband to go to flats. For me, it was a mental thing. After ACL surgery, I just didn't like being attached to my bike. After that, my confidence soared.

    I never had a catastrophic injury, but got so tired of trying something and failing to unclip in time. It started to really affect my confidence. Once I went back to flats, and I could dab when needed, the confidence came back. Soon I was trying stuff again and succeeding. I think, for me, clipless pedals have their place (on less technical trails, perhaps), but I'm getting so much more enjoyment with my flats.

    Thanks Yep, I'm a regular there (even posted a video of me crashing), and that's my latest one. Glad you liked it.. I haven't gotten much feedback about it at all, so it's nice to see that people like it.
    I loved that article! I identified with a lot of what you said. We have a grom that rides with us, too. He just started downhill racing this past year. He is so incredibly encouraging and supportive - it's amazing how cool kids can be to ride with. Anyway, keep up the riding, you've inspired me to want to take a downhill clinic this year!

  16. #16
    Dudette
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    Hmm, I messed up the quote part above a bit, and somehow part of my response ended up within the quote. How do you multi-quote a response?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    I loved that article! I identified with a lot of what you said. We have a grom that rides with us, too. He just started downhill racing this past year. He is so incredibly encouraging and supportive - it's amazing how cool kids can be to ride with. Anyway, keep up the riding, you've inspired me to want to take a downhill clinic this year!
    Completely. I love the grom energy and positive vibe. You can't beat that.

    I never had a catastrophic injury, but got so tired of trying something and failing to unclip in time. It started to really affect my confidence. Once I went back to flats, and I could dab when needed, the confidence came back. Soon I was trying stuff again and succeeding. I think, for me, clipless pedals have their place (on less technical trails, perhaps), but I'm getting so much more enjoyment with my flats.
    The ACL injury was non-biking related. I destroyed it when I was 14 in martial arts and my parents didn't know any better, so I iced for a few days and went back to martial arts, prolly not a good thing. But yeah, surgery in of itself is intentional injury to a body part to fix it long-term. It does change your impressions of things.

    As one of my friends says, "Dabbing totally counts!"

    Do you find you have more control with your feet on the flat pedals? I do, more of a contact patch from the foot to the pedal (as opposed to that little cleat), so I can definitely move the bike with my legs much better.

    I got completely rid of my clipless pedals last year. Even the flat pedals people use can be an interesting discussion. Not everyone likes the big pins I have in the Straitline DeFactos but I love them

    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    Hmm, I messed up the quote part above a bit, and somehow part of my response ended up within the quote. How do you multi-quote a response?
    Heh, no worries

    You put a [ quote ] before the text (no spaces between the brackets) and to end it use a [ /quote ] (same thing, no space between the brackets).

  18. #18
    Dudette
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    Do you find you have more control with your feet on the flat pedals? I do, more of a contact patch from the foot to the pedal (as opposed to that little cleat), so I can definitely move the bike with my legs much better.

    I got completely rid of my clipless pedals last year. Even the flat pedals people use can be an interesting discussion. Not everyone likes the big pins I have in the Straitline DeFactos but I love them

    Not only do I find I have more control (I agree with the larger contact patch), but I have a lot more mobility and have had zero knee pain since I switched back. At first I had to get used to keeping my feet planted on the pedal, and not bounce around on the rough stuff, but I think I have that down pretty well now. I'm in love with the looks of the DMR Vault pedals - think they would awesome on my Giant Trance X 29er (it's all about accessorizing, right?).

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by petey15 View Post
    Not only do I find I have more control (I agree with the larger contact patch), but I have a lot more mobility and have had zero knee pain since I switched back. At first I had to get used to keeping my feet planted on the pedal, and not bounce around on the rough stuff, but I think I have that down pretty well now. I'm in love with the looks of the DMR Vault pedals - think they would awesome on my Giant Trance X 29er (it's all about accessorizing, right?).
    Well, yeah, and if you're pedals are all the wrong color, you're definitely doing it wrong

  20. #20
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    That was a great article. Liked the part about taking off as soon as she catches up. Can't tell you how many times that had happened to me.

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    My husband is the GM of a bike shop... here is his contrabution to your list:

    #12. When you go into the bike shop, do all of the talking for her. There's no way she could possibly know what she wants or needs because it's all overwhelming techy "guy" stuff. Buy her only entry level products because you don't want to waste your money on stuff that she's never going to use all that much anyway (and tell her that in front of the salesperson).

  22. #22
    Dudette
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    Quote Originally Posted by thines View Post
    My husband is the GM of a bike shop... here is his contrabution to your list:

    #12. When you go into the bike shop, do all of the talking for her. There's no way she could possibly know what she wants or needs because it's all overwhelming techy "guy" stuff. Buy her only entry level products because you don't want to waste your money on stuff that she's never going to use all that much anyway (and tell her that in front of the salesperson).
    Oh yeah, because condescension is always a great motivator. Ouch!

  23. #23
    see me rollin, they hatin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    Well, yeah, and if you're pedals are all the wrong color, you're definitely doing it wrong
    oh gerlfriend bling is a MUST!!!!



    and make sure it's pink. "teh bytches LUV pink!"
    fap

  24. #24
    see me rollin, they hatin
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    my first real bike was in the 700$ range. good enough to not be a complete turd, but not a huge price risk if i didnt end up riding it much. Then again, i was ripping for 5 months on dept store bikes and loving it, so no risk there!
    fap

  25. #25
    Dudette
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    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    oh gerlfriend bling is a MUST!!!!



    and make sure it's pink. "teh bytches LUV pink!"
    Thanks for that - I just snorted my coffee!

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