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  1. #51
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    I think the biggest reason people yield to me is how *few* bikers there are. There isn't that pretentious cult attitude when there aren't popular biking trails, you know? The bikers on these trails seem to mostly be weekend warriors or polite, well behaved kids noodling around on their BMXes. I have gotten many noses turned up at me by passing road cyclists who can see me from the street, but people riding casually on the same trail as me are really nice. I have only had a nose turned up at me by a mountain biker a couple of times, and I recall them being young. It seems that boys stop maturing by the time they turn 14, and begin to mature again around 35

    Come to think of it, just on the paved path to the trails, I do get the occasional crabby old person going for a walk/ jog/ dog walk who get visibly incensed about moving over. One person was coming uphill, and saw me approaching DOWNHILL, and stopped in the middle of the path the fix her shoe. Her partner was trying to drag her out of the way, and she wouldn't budge. I had to come to a dead stop and wait for two people to quit hogging a path that is wide enough for a car to drive down... Some people also grab their little dogs like a set of pearls, but I can understand that since some dogs will want to chase/ run right at moving vehicles. I slow down when I pass dogs for this reason.

    The people on the actual *trails*, however, are very well behaved and friendly!

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    Because society is uber paranoid now?
    I think that really does have a lot to do with it. The media concentrates on the bad news. After all "if it bleeds, it leads" is their motto. That stuff brings in the viewers. And I think it causes most people to think the world is a much more dangerous and scary place than it truly is.
    I watch the AM newscast to catch the weather report (to see if it is good biking or skiing weather) and other than that, I rarely turn on the TV. But don't worry that I am deprived, because my coworkers are always happy to fill me in about the latest "threat" that was on the evening news.
    More people should turn off their TV sets and go ride their bikes!
    I drank the 29er koolaid- turns out it was POWERade

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayseakay View Post
    there are risks involved in everything. You can die in a car crash, hell you can fall down some stairs and break your neck. But do you actively put yourself in positions where you can be in danger or possibly get hurt? That's not being brave and not paranoid...that's recklessness.
    Ummm... isn't that the very DEFINITION of activities like: downhill mountain biking, kayaking, rock climbing, backcountry skiing, horseback riding, BASE jumping, and tons of other sports?
    Sorry, you are not making your case. I know of people who have had serious injuries mountain biking. I still do it. I know of people who have been attacked or assaulted walking down the street. I still walk down streets!

    Seriously, the most dangerous thing ANY of us do everyday is get in our cars and drive.

    Your CDOT Dollar :: Safety

    We all know this, and yet we do it every day. I would guess my chances of "being in danger or possibly getting hurt" are higher on my drive to work (especially in Denver traffic)-- knock on wood
    I drank the 29er koolaid- turns out it was POWERade

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayseakay
    But do you actively put yourself in positions where you can be in danger or possibly get hurt? That's not being brave and not paranoid...that's recklessness.
    And this is probably a big reason why like 80% of Americans are overweight and obese. Because getting off the couch could be reckless...

    I'm sorry, but it seems like you're on a bike forum, telling people that they shouldn't bike because it's actively putting yourself in a position to get hurt?

    I guess I'm just a reckless person then!

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    And this is probably a big reason why like 80% of Americans are overweight and obese. Because getting off the couch could be reckless...

    I'm sorry, but it seems like you're on a bike forum, telling people that they shouldn't bike because it's actively putting yourself in a position to get hurt?

    I guess I'm just a reckless person then!
    I'm convinced I'm much safer riding my bike in the desert than I am driving my car in rush hour traffic, going to downtown El Paso at night or even shopping at Wal-mart. In fact just pulling into shopping mall parking lot produces an extreme level of anxiety that can only be cured by turning around driving home and hopping on my bike for a ride in the desert.

    Risk is relative

  6. #56
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    I'm sorry. I'll stop posting here.

    I guess my only desire was to relate my experiences that I've had over the past couple of years.

    I ride XC 3-4 times a week (I would be out more but school puts a cap on a lot of it) and I ride road consistently. I've hit 56 mph on a road bike and 40 mph on a mt bike. I race in enduros and I am currently training for my first 12 hour race this summer and my first 24 hr race next year (would have been sooner...only been riding for 2 years now though). I own a horse and have competed heavily in jumping (up to 3'6 ft). I've played sports my entire life (basketball, flag football, volleyball, softball). I've been injured many times (got hit by a bat and had my wrist broken playing catcher, torn my ligaments in my knee during volleyball, had numerous concussions even with a helmet on after falls from horses, and have gotten serious whiplash on falls from bikes). I've been in two life threatening car accidents. I know about risks...I've taken quite a few in my life.

    I also lock my doors at night. I don't walk in parking lots alone past midnight. I use crosswalks, I use seatbelts, I wear helmets, I carry a cellphone everywhere I go, and I wear reflective gear when I'm out riding at dusk. I also don't ride alone.

    Sorry for stating an opinion. I just saw this thread and immediately thought of the girl who lived right around my neighborhood, used the SAME trails I used, and got jumped and murdered. It wasn't necessarily just a news story for me and it wasn't an isolated incident.

    Make your own decision but please don't attack me for offering up some advice with experiences behind it. Obviously...I don't control anyone. I'm sorry the first post was even written as a "please don't" post. It should have just been "I don't ride alone because...".

    But that's it...I'm good. I've said my peace. Just know that I'd never tell anyone not to ride. I ride heavily, hard, and long. It's something I love to do. But I don't do it without caution.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayseakay View Post
    I'm sorry. I'll stop posting here.

    I guess my only desire was to relate my experiences that I've had over the past couple of years.

    I ride XC 3-4 times a week (I would be out more but school puts a cap on a lot of it) and I ride road consistently. I've hit 56 mph on a road bike and 40 mph on a mt bike. I race in enduros and I am currently training for my first 12 hour race this summer and my first 24 hr race next year (would have been sooner...only been riding for 2 years now though). I own a horse and have competed heavily in jumping (up to 3'6 ft). I've played sports my entire life (basketball, flag football, volleyball, softball). I've been injured many times (got hit by a bat and had my wrist broken playing catcher, torn my ligaments in my knee during volleyball, had numerous concussions even with a helmet on after falls from horses, and have gotten serious whiplash on falls from bikes). I've been in two life threatening car accidents. I know about risks...I've taken quite a few in my life.

    I also lock my doors at night. I don't walk in parking lots alone past midnight. I use crosswalks, I use seatbelts, I wear helmets, I carry a cellphone everywhere I go, and I wear reflective gear when I'm out riding at dusk. I also don't ride alone.

    Sorry for stating an opinion. I just saw this thread and immediately thought of the girl who lived right around my neighborhood, used the SAME trails I used, and got jumped and murdered. It wasn't necessarily just a news story for me and it wasn't an isolated incident.

    Make your own decision but please don't attack me for offering up some advice with experiences behind it. Obviously...I don't control anyone. I'm sorry the first post was even written as a "please don't" post. It should have just been "I don't ride alone because...".

    But that's it...I'm good. I've said my peace. Just know that I'd never tell anyone not to ride. I ride heavily, hard, and long. It's something I love to do. But I don't do it without caution.
    We're all just expressing opinions... Didnt really see any attacks.

    It's all about situational awareness and I don't need to post up a resume to validate my opinion.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by kinsler View Post
    I'm convinced I'm much safer riding my bike in the desert than I am driving my car in rush hour traffic, going to downtown El Paso at night or even shopping at Wal-mart. In fact just pulling into shopping mall parking lot produces an extreme level of anxiety that can only be cured by turning around driving home and hopping on my bike for a ride in the desert.

    Risk is relative
    Oh my gosh, I've stopped shopping at my local Walmart because I can't stand navigating the parking lot!! I end up so angry and in a bad mood I have to leave!

    Risk is also relative to where you live. I live in Wyoming, so crime and other "bad stuff" just doesn't happen as often as in many other areas of the country. It's not uncommon for people to do outdoor activities alone here, be it hiking or biking or running or camping. The biggest threats are usually wildlife or angry cows - the cows being the worse.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    Risk is also relative to where you live. I live in Wyoming, so crime and other "bad stuff" just doesn't happen as often as in many other areas of the country. It's not uncommon for people to do outdoor activities alone here, be it hiking or biking or running or camping. The biggest threats are usually wildlife or angry cows - the cows being the worse.
    Absolutely!

    I lived in Hawaii and I only camped one weekend in 5 years and that was backpacking in a national park.
    Now that I live and travel in the west I camp almost every trip we go on... even if it's just pulling off the highway and crashing in the back of the truck on our way to ski. In fact a couple of weekends ago I camped by myself at Big Bend State Park which is separated from Mexico by about 20 yards of the Rio Grande! Now I certainly wouldn't be so cavalier about this if I was living back on the east coast.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    Oh my gosh, I've stopped shopping at my local Walmart because I can't stand navigating the parking lot!! I end up so angry and in a bad mood I have to leave!

    Risk is also relative to where you live. I live in Wyoming, so crime and other "bad stuff" just doesn't happen as often as in many other areas of the country. It's not uncommon for people to do outdoor activities alone here, be it hiking or biking or running or camping. The biggest threats are usually wildlife or angry cows - the cows being the worse.
    Living in San Jose is very different than living in Wyoming, although I think our Walmart parking lots are much scarier

    As long as you take the right precautions with you, you're fine.

    I'm tempted to get a personal beacon or something like that for if I decide to ride alone. The other thing about where I ride alone is I'll run into other people on the trail. I'm less likely to ride somewhere where I'll end up being the only one there, but that's part of being in a big metro area.
    MTB4Her.com: mountain bike site for women, by women

  11. #61
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    I dunno... until you've seen a Walmart parking lot on a Saturday in Cheyenne, WY, you don't know how bad Walmart parking lots can get! :P The people are rabid and insane!

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