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  1. #51
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    Bike and trainer made it. In fact they would have been here upon arrival if the Army hadn't changed my location last minute. I'm spending 6 days a week on the trainer and supplementing that with 3-4 days of running and 4 days of gym stuff. I think the cross training is really helping me maintain my fitness as well as combating the boredom! I just need to find my long movies for my weekend "long ride!"

  2. #52
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    glad to hear it! let us know how it's going! stay safe

  3. #53
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    I like this idea of setting goals! Here we go:

    find cheap reliable second hand downhill bike
    take said bike to lift access hill 2x/week
    join Thursday night race series with said bike, and NOT come in last

    organize Wednesday Women's evening bike ride during season
    ride 'stupid traverse' which means getting over my left handed exposure fear
    uphill switchback improvement, MAJOR improvement needed

    visit skills park weekly, ride rails, bridges, pump track
    ride the downhills I currently walk on some of my trails (Oh dear, swine flu, slunt, hyperextension)

    Keep track of my rides and mileage
    ride by myself if needed (it's the bears that scare me)
    learn how to change a tire quickly and use a quicklink and replace a derailleur hanger

    I think that is it for now. That is probably enough, that is a big list for a season that hasn't even started yet!!

  4. #54
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    Cleopatra, do you carry bear spray or ? I have bear spray for camping/hiking that clips on so that is my plan. Same plan for problem moose and men.

    Since I am very new I have lots of goals but here is where I am starting.
    2013 Goals Part 1:

    Learn basic bike maintenance (going to a class tonight)

    Learn more advanced bike maintenance (next month -Over three weeks will cover how to take apart, rebuild and place back together the front end of the bike, brakes, seat, pedals, rebuild/tune and the drive train.-I like knowing how stuff works, what it's called and how to fix it. )

    Build up my ride time and distance (snow better melt soon)
    Learn to lift the front wheel (am getting better at this already)
    Learn to go over obstacles
    Learn to track stand (I managed 30 seconds yesterday!)
    Signed the kids up for a kids mb workshop that parents are encouraged to particpate in (starts in May)
    Join Alaska Dirt Diva's (checks in the mail)

  5. #55
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    [QUOTE=OkieInAlaska;10325157]Cleopatra, do you carry bear spray or ? I have bear spray for camping/hiking that clips on so that is my plan. Same plan for problem moose and men.

    Abso-freakin-lutely!! We have several bear encounters every year. Mostly they are completely benign, black bears that see you and run away. But most years there have been a grizzly sow and cubs hanging around the trails. No one has been hurt to my knowledge, but bear spray is important. Of course best course of action is making lots of noise!! Which we do all the time.

  6. #56
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    Quick update on my goals. I think this counts as more technical Still working on cornering, and trails that fall to the left and the steeps.

    MTB4Her.com: mountain bike site for women, by women

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    Quick update on my goals. I think this counts as more technical Still working on cornering, and trails that fall to the left and the steeps.

    Lookin' good, Stripes! The terrain you have out there intrigues me - riding rocks looks like so much fun

  8. #58
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    I started working on the "getting comfortable leaving terra firma" goal this weekend. I need a lot of work, but here are a couple of (blurry) pictures I managed to get with my self-timer. The fact that I got off the ground at all, and landed with both wheels on the ground and not head first, was huge for me
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Riding Goals for 2013-jump-practice.jpg  

    Riding Goals for 2013-leaving-terra-firma.jpg  


  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    Quick update on my goals. I think this counts as more technical Still working on cornering, and trails that fall to the left and the steeps.
    I have the same problem with Left hand exposure. The only reason I can think of is because my right leg is stronger so it is usually the first foot down if I am uncomfortable. Any other thoughts why one side is harder than other?

  10. #60
    see me rollin, they hatin
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    riding last night thru some technical twisty stuff (i realize these are sections even good riders might fumble on, so i shouldn't feel so bad) that i have issues with super tight turns that also have off camber rocks and roots WITHIN the turn. This is difficult stuff and i always freeze up because i assume I'm going to bash my handlebar or crank while trying to twist around it. Then again, i see my riding partner, on a racy 26er cut right thru it. Most guys i ride with have way more experience than i, so that's a lot of it, but knowing that it CAN be done when i see others, means i should give it more of a try.
    fap

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by cleopatra999 View Post
    I have the same problem with Left hand exposure. The only reason I can think of is because my right leg is stronger so it is usually the first foot down if I am uncomfortable. Any other thoughts why one side is harder than other?
    My theory...most people get on and off on the left side of the bike, so having to put down the right is less natural. I think it also ties in with the favored or "sugar foot", which I think is right for more people; you're more likely to give up or mess up after a right pedal stroke, in which case you'll land on your left foot...unless there is no land there!

    Other thoughts welcome.

  12. #62
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    I have built up my dirt jumper since this pic was taken. Now I just need the pump track to dry out.



    I also got a lighter all mtn bandit 26'' which is a dream to ride. I should be able to climb better

    For dh I'm getting my bike tuned and ready when the bike park opens in May. Our local bike park is having a Pedal Fest and one of the events I'm stoked about is the Women's dh clinic
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  13. #63
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    I really want to improve on a bunch of things...but I think I am getting too old ! I turned 64 this year and I'm afraid my goals now are to just maintain skills and fitness...and avoid injury ! ! ! I am slowly dialing back the technical and risky (no more fast Noble rock gardens...and there are a couple of spots in Mission Trails I won't do since my femoral neck fracture 3 years ago...lots of things on World Cup Anderson where I take the bypass without even hesitating...)

    I've crossed things off my list over the years. No more jumping off drops since going higher...and higher...and higher...and then separating my shoulder and getting a concussion. Noble rock garden = broken finger and knee split to bone (separate rides). R sided drop offs = nervous since fall from tough switchback and scary concussion, fall off cliff when my handlebar was grabbed by a tree branch..saved by elastic cord on my Camelbak hanging up on another tree branch, fall into steep gully that chainringed my leg but could have been much worse. More aggression in rocky downhills tamed by OTB with minimal damage but could have been much worse. Wheelies abandoned when two much more skilled friends went over backwards and limped away. Charging up Gooseberry verticals toned down by memory of much more skilled friend breaking his ankle/surgery with a simple topple over fall. Better skinny riding suffers from two nasty outcomes...one where my front wheel ran off the skinny, dug in, and I did a high speed OTB...the other where I was at a skills park and trying to go further and further on the elevated skinny...finally fell off (duh)...thankfully no injuries...but TONS of potential. oh yeah impaled my quadriceps on a sharp manzanita branch with an aggressive move on Cowles..it broke off and the ends disappeared inside...3 inch chunk had to be dug out in ER. Efforts to go faster dampened by helicopter ride off trail after high speed slide out on rocks on the Mesa above Tunnels and landing directly on a rock with my hip resulting in femoral neck fracture/3 pins. I think you can tell I am crazy about this sport (or maybe just crazy) and can't stay away...but sadly, longer and less technical is starting to be my mantra. Any other ladies in that boat ?

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie View Post
    I really want to improve on a bunch of things...but I think I am getting too old ! I turned 64 this year and I'm afraid my goals now are to just maintain skills and fitness...and avoid injury ! ! !
    You know, this is something I've been thinking about lately....

    First up: I'm hoping to get a new bike for my 60th and put some miles on it, so you're already my hero. Maybe even another for my 70th if things go well. This has been a long-term goal of mine for quite a while.

    But I'm also trying to get some of the really burly back country stuff listed that I want to do over the next decade or so, because I'm assuming at some point I might not have the strength, fitness, and/or health to pull them off. But I don't know when or how that's gonna happen.... I'm riding with some guys in their 50s that are still regularly kicking butt on the whippersnappers.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

  15. #65
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    Master clipless pedals (so far I've fallen butt first on a cactus and ripped the top of my finger off on a rock).
    Get faster/better at climbs

  16. #66
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    Stripes, great photo, looks like a fun area to ride.

    Julie, wow, you are my hero! Glad you are still on your bike, riding and loving it.

    Ray how much off the top of your finger did you lose? Ouch.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by cleopatra999 View Post
    But most years there have been a grizzly sow and cubs hanging around the trails. No one has been hurt to my knowledge, but bear spray is important. Of course best course of action is making lots of noise!! Which we do all the time.
    A few years back a young girl was riding in midnight mountain bike race (does't really get dark here in the summer remember) and was attacked and dragged off the trail by a grizzly. She was hurt but survived. This was in town but on a trail near a salmon creek. Last year we had lots of bear attacks around Eagle River (3 that I can think of, no one killed). Scary stuff.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by OkieInAlaska View Post
    A few years back a young girl was riding in midnight mountain bike race (does't really get dark here in the summer remember) and was attacked and dragged off the trail by a grizzly. She was hurt but survived. This was in town but on a trail near a salmon creek. Last year we had lots of bear attacks around Eagle River (3 that I can think of, no one killed). Scary stuff.
    That sounds terrifying! Glad the only bears we have around here are black bears..

    Goals for 2013: This one is going to sound weird, but I want to increase my endurance while standing and pedaling. I notice that I sit in my seat far too much..I really only get up out of my saddle on descents and short techy sections. I realized that one of the reasons why the guys I ride with are a lot faster than me is because they have much better leg strength and endurance and can attack mildly technical trails by standing for long durations. A good portion of our trails are fairly techy with a lot of short/medium climbs and descents, and I'd like to be able to attack them in a standing postion and not die from exhaustion immediately afterwards (like what happens now).

    In order to make this happen, I've been riding with my seat dropped to a point where it is essentially useless on the trails, which forces me to ride standing and mash on a higher gear the whole time. I plan on doing this for a few weeks, and then I'll go back to riding normally. (Just hopefully with improved standing ability.) I've already felt an improvement in my strength and endurance, and I've only been doing this for about a week.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by verslowrdr View Post
    You know, this is something I've been thinking about lately....

    First up: I'm hoping to get a new bike for my 60th and put some miles on it, so you're already my hero. Maybe even another for my 70th if things go well. This has been a long-term goal of mine for quite a while.

    But I'm also trying to get some of the really burly back country stuff listed that I want to do over the next decade or so, because I'm assuming at some point I might not have the strength, fitness, and/or health to pull them off. But I don't know when or how that's gonna happen.... I'm riding with some guys in their 50s that are still regularly kicking butt on the whippersnappers.
    This on the 50-80 year olds kicking whippersnappers' butts. Don't let age (it happens) or injury (it also happens) affect you. Your call: Do what you love.

    I never thought at 39 that I would be riding a dirt jumper, much less jumping it. What I love about mountain biking because the metal, rubber and dirt is the constant challenge you can take, or not. Some people like long and not as technical, some people like the choppy ride.

    Full disclosure: I've been riding since I was 19, and I just now feel like I'm getting to be a better rider.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by OkieInAlaska View Post
    A few years back a young girl was riding in midnight mountain bike race (does't really get dark here in the summer remember) and was attacked and dragged off the trail by a grizzly. She was hurt but survived. This was in town but on a trail near a salmon creek. Last year we had lots of bear attacks around Eagle River (3 that I can think of, no one killed). Scary stuff.
    Yikes, that is scary, I am acutely aware of the bears here on our trails. Luckily we have so many riders it is easy to find people to go biking with all season long. I rarely need to go alone.

  21. #71
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    I'm very late to the party. Last year, my goal was just to get back on the freakin' bike after taking some advocacy/trail burnout time off the bike. Finally last fall I started riding regularly again after a hiatus. This spring it's felt good but I just had a lot of noise in my head, anxiety, and loss of confidence. So goal #1 was to go back to bike camp as a camper, not a coaching assistant. Four days in Rossland pretty much blew out the pipes, reminded me of what I DO know how to do, and gave me light where there were shadows. This has made goal setting much easier. So my goals are to get back to where I was before, with some specifics. I'm going to roll Rushmore before the end of the season (this would be new), and recover my confidence and speed. I also am pretty sure I want to get my Level 1 Certification for coaching, probably this fall. That feels like a nice way to keep contributing without the heavy load that advocacy carries.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    I'm very late to the party. Last year, my goal was just to get back on the freakin' bike after taking some advocacy/trail burnout time off the bike. Finally last fall I started riding regularly again after a hiatus. This spring it's felt good but I just had a lot of noise in my head, anxiety, and loss of confidence. So goal #1 was to go back to bike camp as a camper, not a coaching assistant. Four days in Rossland pretty much blew out the pipes, reminded me of what I DO know how to do, and gave me light where there were shadows. This has made goal setting much easier. So my goals are to get back to where I was before, with some specifics. I'm going to roll Rushmore before the end of the season (this would be new), and recover my confidence and speed. I also am pretty sure I want to get my Level 1 Certification for coaching, probably this fall. That feels like a nice way to keep contributing without the heavy load that advocacy carries.
    Congrats on getting back--it's really hard after you've been doing so much for the community and been burned on advocacy/trail burnout.

    I'm definitely familiar with the advocacy thing enough that I got too wrapped up into it that it almost screwed up my marriage

    I'm interested in what you do for the coaching thing. I'm kinda at the point of wanting to get back to helping without being political (and bitter--which seems to come with the territory now).

  23. #73
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    What do you mean, what do I do? Where I get the certification from? I am looking at
    Home | Endless Biking
    | ZEPtechniques Mountain Bike Camps & Instructor Training |
    IMIC has been absorbed by IMBA - the professional coaches I know aren't real hot on that setup. I live close enough to BC that going there for certification will just be a little vacation. I may even be able to get the local club to pay part of it as they really want more instructors. Even if I only ended up doing local stuff, I'm cool with that. Bike sponsorships wouldn't be too bad, though.

  24. #74
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    I learned how to bunny hop this year. My husband's instruction on how to BH never really worked. My 9 year old cousin's instruction did. So now that I can BH in parking lot, I need to learn how to use it on the trail.
    For you girls that can wheelie or manual, I salute you! My bad low back keeps me from pulling up that front wheel on anything higher than a standard curb.
    My mental block is a steep paver drop. I can do steep dirt drops but the concrete paver stops me dead in my tracks. Especially if there is any type of switchback paver drop. The thought of crashing on a paver drop and then scraping my skin off the whole way down is a mental photo that won't leave my brain when I approach one.
    I'm also trying to get out of my seat more, especially climbs. My husband is amazed that I make most of my climbs seated (pulling on my bars and balancing on the horn of my seat, so not specifically planted on the saddle) but this method doesn't work out of me on steep paver climbs or any steep climbs with roots.
    I then have to deal with the fact that I am 50 lbs over weight. I feel I do great for a plump gal; I'm strong but winterized.
    So I'm just gonna keep on working on conquering my switchback paver drop fears and keep working on shedding some lbs.
    In terms of working on speed, gonna have to wait til Florida has some cooler months. Our 95 degree summers with 100% humidity are tough; speed usually equals bad head aches.

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by kcanada75 View Post
    I learned how to bunny hop this year. My husband's instruction on how to BH never really worked. My 9 year old cousin's instruction did. So now that I can BH in parking lot, I need to learn how to use it on the trail.
    For you girls that can wheelie or manual, I salute you! My bad low back keeps me from pulling up that front wheel on anything higher than a standard curb.
    My mental block is a steep paver drop. I can do steep dirt drops but the concrete paver stops me dead in my tracks. Especially if there is any type of switchback paver drop. The thought of crashing on a paver drop and then scraping my skin off the whole way down is a mental photo that won't leave my brain when I approach one.
    I'm also trying to get out of my seat more, especially climbs. My husband is amazed that I make most of my climbs seated (pulling on my bars and balancing on the horn of my seat, so not specifically planted on the saddle) but this method doesn't work out of me on steep paver climbs or any steep climbs with roots.
    I then have to deal with the fact that I am 50 lbs over weight. I feel I do great for a plump gal; I'm strong but winterized.
    So I'm just gonna keep on working on conquering my switchback paver drop fears and keep working on shedding some lbs.
    In terms of working on speed, gonna have to wait til Florida has some cooler months. Our 95 degree summers with 100% humidity are tough; speed usually equals bad head aches.
    Congrats on learning to bunnyhop

    You don't pull up the front for a wheelie or manual. The handlebars just go with you for a ride.. it's all done from the legs if it's done correctly. I can manual at speed (need to practice more), and I can do a wheelie for about a half-pedal stroke. I'm stil practicing, but having a DJ helps with those skills with the really super short chainstays.

    "Winterised" is a great way to explain the extra layers I'm carrying too (currently 30 lbs overweight, used to be 60 lbs overweight). It sucks for climbing, but it feels great in the winter.

    Where in Florida are you? I used to ride the barge canal trails (now part of the Santos system) and a few others in Gainesville when I was in college.

    Switchbacks to the right are still hard for me. I just keep practicing.

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