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  1. #1
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    Need some help from the women out there...

    My gf just picked up MTB and didn't like her saddle. Her sit bones (closer to the perineal area) were really sore after 1 hour ride. I know that was maybe too much but we were just going slow and taking it easy and didn't really notice the time..the trails were easy too. Anyway, need some suggestions for a good comfortable saddle.

    I've done some googling and all I've seen so far is maybe:

    1. Selle Royal Lookin - problem is it's European and I'm in Canada so shipping and being in GBP might come out expensive.

    2. Terry Cite X - Just called my local MEC (Outdoor Coop Store) to hold one for me. Will check it out.

    3. Terry Liberated X - Looks like a good option too. Not as wide as the Cite if the width is gonna be a problem. Cite X seems to be the most comfortable one.

    4. WTB Leisure She - Looks comfy but I'm afraid it will be too squishy and that this is a saddle that's mostly for commuter bikes where someone would just ride it on short leisurely trips (hence the name) around the neighborhood for like 30 minutes tops.

    For the Terry saddles, is it better to get the gel versions? Like, the Cite and the Liberated both have gel and non-gel versions...

    I've read about Brooks, but I think it's ugly (no offense to the fans) esp for MTB and I don't see her putting up with a break in period, esp if it takes at least 100 miles. Plus it's from UK again..

    So if you women know of a particular brand/model that's really popular among women I would appreciate the help.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Sorry I didn't notice the Sticky before I posted this.. if I still don't find any answers there I will bump this thread..

  3. #3
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    I've ridden my Terry Butterfly for years...it takes a couple of rides to "wear your butt in" but once that's over with I've had no complaints. Make sure she is also wearing good shorts.

  4. #4
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    If *only* her sit bones are sore, I'd say she is on the *right* saddle.

    Soreness in other places would indicate to me a wrong saddle.

    To resolve soreness of the sit bones, I think it's just a matter of lots of short rides until the body toughens up.

  5. #5
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    Check out Specialized saddles. I used to use Terry, but they stopped feeling good and I've been really happy with the Specialized Lithia 143. They also have an assometer where they can measure your sit bones.

  6. #6
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    Yeah I was gonna say that from reading the sticky it seems that some people are happy with Fizik, WTB..Terrys are quite popular, more than the WTBs, and then seems like a few people were even happier with Specialized even after being satisfied with Terrys.

    Seems like the best thing to do to take out the guesswork is to go to Specialized to have her butt measured and then try a Specialized saddle. If that doesn't work, then it might be a personal thing and then back to trial and error but at least I know which brands are popular with the women so if a Specialized doesn't work, then we can try the Terry Butterfly. Seems like it's the most popular Terry and the Liberator has mixed reviews.

    Any comments on the Cite? Is that saddle more just for commuter type bikes?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by KAriadne View Post
    If *only* her sit bones are sore, I'd say she is on the *right* saddle.
    Well...she showed me where they actually hurt and I would say they're the sit bones..BUT.. on the inner area near the perineum.. I have just come back after years of not riding myself and I am sore in the same area. However, it didn't bug me as much because I ride with a more crouched position..like a downhill position and she's a typical girl with her back straight and her butt sticking out. I just tried her saddle right now and mimicked her posture and it pressed more on my sore area. Same area but I felt it more if I mimicked her stance. So I guess my point is that it seems like we are sore in the same spot even though we're using different saddles but it seems like she's really complaining of her pain because a.) Her stance/posture aggravates it; and b.) She's a total beginner...

    However, I think the saddle could be more comfortable. It's a stock saddle that came from a $400 Norco Storm 6.1 Forma.

  8. #8
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    The Selle Italia DIVA gel flow saddle is wonderful. I find it more comfortable and easier to obtain than any of the Terry saddles I have owned or tried (Butterfly, Falcon x, Liberator, Damselfly).
    Never give up, never surrender.

  9. #9
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    there are plenty of crazy high end saddles out there, but i'm super happy with my Specialized Rival. ($100 or under) i think mine is technically a men's, but the similar women's version is the Ariel. I used to have a fancy Fizik saddle, but it curved down at the edges and felt like it was pinching nerves and spreading my sit bones! Much happier now!
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  10. #10
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    I have Cro Mag Lynx on both my dh and am bikes.
    I go on long rides on the am (all kinds of conditions and terrain)
    I don't wear a chamois . I change riding positions constantly and not had problem with soreness, stiffness, chafing etc.
    I don't think there is a miracle saddle out there otherwise we would all have one
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyDi View Post
    The Selle Italia DIVA gel flow saddle is wonderful. I find it more comfortable and easier to obtain than any of the Terry saddles I have owned or tried (Butterfly, Falcon x, Liberator, Damselfly).
    +1 My bike fitter recommended this saddle, and I love it. Have one for the road bike and got another for the mtn bike. I had a Terry FLX and could not believe how much better the Diva gel flow works.

  12. #12
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    If I dont ride for awhile, by butt always hurts when I get back on the bike. My Terry Butterfly is my cushiest saddle, but she prob needs to get her butt broken in.

  13. #13
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    I'm hesitant to recommend the one size fits all approach. I haven't tried the Selle, but I have gone through about 10-15 demo saddles in the past few months. Everyone's shape is different, and when I'd try saddles that friends would recommend, they felt like torture devices to me.

    Someone finally recommended the Specialized system, and after sitting on the assometer, I found that my sit bones are really narrow - which is why wide saddles hurt in the area that the OP mentioned. It turns out that I also really like the cut out shape, which I had never considered. I ended up going with a men's road saddle, Specialized Romin, which looks uncomfortable but actually fits me better than any others I've tried.

    Her butt does need to get used to the activity, but if a saddle is spectacularly uncomfortable right from the start, it's not going to work for a long ride. I ended up taking my bike to a shop and trying out several saddles in an afternoon for a few laps around the block. If they were immediately uncomfortable, I ruled them out. If they were ok, I'd demo them for a few days. I think it's the best way to work through the different options. Keep in mind that some shops only stock a few brands so you might need to try a couple of different shops to find the right saddle.

  14. #14
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    Thanks SkiMtb. That's a really good way to go about it. I don't think the saddle was uncomfortable right from the start for her so we will probably give it a few more rides. Haven't been able to ride again since the last time due to work schedule and moving. Anyway, if this saddle really doesn't work, I think the most logical step is to go the Specialized assometer route.

  15. #15
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    All good responses here. Thanks for all the help gals!

  16. #16
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    Sounds like you've got a good plan! If the saddle doesn't work, I'd start with the assometer to give you a general idea of what width saddle will work. It will help you narrow down your choices...I wish I would have started with that.

  17. #17
    mc juice
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    I got measured & was between 130-143 sizes. First, on my mtb I switched from padded stock Spec. saddle to Spec. Ruby Expert in 143mm - lots less padded, more minimal. Loved it, was on it a while but recently was getting chafed while prepping for race with lots of climbing. So got it in a 130mm. My road bike came with the popular Selle Italia Lady Diva Gel Flow, & I liked the way it was made, but it was 155mm wide & chafed the heck out of me. I must have a cutout & after demoing some Selle SMP & other Spec. saddles, on roadie switched to Selle Italia's new for 2012 Lady Flow (NOT Lady Gel Flow) & it measures 135mm wide & I LOVE it. Think no issues any more on 50 mi road rides. Good luck!
    the journey is the destination

  18. #18
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    "Sit bones" are the bottom of the pelvis that ride on the back portion of the saddle and what you measure with a piece of memory foam at a shop to get the proper width saddle.

    The area you are talking about is not the same and hurts on guys too if they haven't ridden for a while or do a longer ride than usual.

    A saddle that works for one may not work for another even if they both test out to the same size.

    If she rides more and the bike is fit to her measurements, in time, she should be fine. Provided she is willing to go through the pain that everyone experiences.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by KAriadne View Post
    If *only* her sit bones are sore, I'd say she is on the *right* saddle.

    Soreness in other places would indicate to me a wrong saddle.

    To resolve soreness of the sit bones, I think it's just a matter of lots of short rides until the body toughens up.
    I would tend to agree with this, it sounds like she is sitting in the right position. As long as there is no numbness along with the soreness. An hour in the saddle was just maybe too much to start. Does she wear a chami? that would help too.

  20. #20
    bee
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    Jon, I think what you will find is that saddle choice is a highly individual thing. I, myself, prefer a wider saddle. If I was riding in cycling shorts, then I would want more of a lightweight minimalist road saddle to avoid the chafing on those inner thighs. . However, if I was just getting a saddle for a more upright commuter type bike, that same road saddle would be horrible. In that case, I go for a big cushy non roadie saddle especially if I am just wearing casual shorts or jeans.

  21. #21
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    I got her a Pearl Izumi padded liner and I don't know if it was that or that she's just getting used to it but after the second ride a few days ago, she said that it wasn't as bad as the first time. She said she thinks she's getting used to it because the padding of the liner doesn't really cover much of the sore area.. So the saddle may just be ok and she just needs to get used to it. I was just concerned because after the first ride she was in so much pain that even sitting on the couch hurt. I think we just rode for too long for her first ride.

  22. #22
    bee
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    Quote Originally Posted by jon777 View Post
    I got her a Pearl Izumi padded liner and I don't know if it was that or that she's just getting used to it but after the second ride a few days ago, she said that it wasn't as bad as the first time. She said she thinks she's getting used to it because the padding of the liner doesn't really cover much of the sore area.. So the saddle may just be ok and she just needs to get used to it. I was just concerned because after the first ride she was in so much pain that even sitting on the couch hurt. I think we just rode for too long for her first ride.

    Good idea. Yeah, I would give it a couple weeks. And then, if it doesn't work don't make her suffer. You can always get her a more cushy saddle, and then come back to the skinnier saddle as her fitness improves.

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