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  1. #1
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    gave road biking a chance

    I am just a beginner at mountain biking and have been trying to get my friends to join in. My friend/boss always tries to get me to get a road bike and ride with her. Today I went on my first road ride and borrowed a very nice Specialized bike. I definitely had an appreciation for the bike, very lightweight and efficient. I think the size and everything were okay, but it just felt so odd. We only went about 7.5 miles. The first half of the ride I felt very nervous. It didn't help that I had no idea how to shift and my shoelace came loose and got grabbed by the chain. While figuring out how to shift, I almost hit the curb. By the second half of the ride I was a little more comfortable and actually ended up doing okay. What do you think, should I give it more of a chance? I feel way more comfortable mountain biking, but don't want to be close minded. P.S. You can tell what I am wanting to hear by the fact that I posted here and not on a road bike forum.

  2. #2
    hari kari
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    Quote Originally Posted by beegirl
    I am just a beginner at mountain biking and have been trying to get my friends to join in. My friend/boss always tries to get me to get a road bike and ride with her. Today I went on my first road ride and borrowed a very nice Specialized bike. I definitely had an appreciation for the bike, very lightweight and efficient. I think the size and everything were okay, but it just felt so odd. We only went about 7.5 miles. The first half of the ride I felt very nervous. It didn't help that I had no idea how to shift and my shoelace came loose and got grabbed by the chain. While figuring out how to shift, I almost hit the curb. By the second half of the ride I was a little more comfortable and actually ended up doing okay. What do you think, should I give it more of a chance? I feel way more comfortable mountain biking, but don't want to be close minded. P.S. You can tell what I am wanting to hear by the fact that I posted here and not on a road bike forum.
    Roadies suck.

    Even so, it's hellaciously good for mtb training, makes you strong as an ox, and does (believe it or not) get fricking fun as soon as you learn how to handle a road bike. Also, there's a whole nuther zen thing that goes on in road biking. I think it has to do with the sustained, high, and steady heart rates you get going?

    I still strictly road bike to improve and train for my mountain biking. That said, I have learned to enjoy it a lot more than I ever expected ...

    Oh, and PS: You have no freaking idea just how fast you can go on a bike if you haven't yet road biked. Scary, scary fast. That too improves your mtb skills. You're able to go WFO with a lot more confidence.

    Oh, and PPS: To forkboy, thanks again for all the tips. You got me dialed in right, early, and now I pass lots of folks on the descents. Cars too!!
    Last edited by Hello Kitty; 09-18-2005 at 02:47 PM.

  3. #3
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    Kitty, what's your road ride?

  4. #4
    hari kari
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    Quote Originally Posted by kept man
    Kitty, what's your road ride?
    Oh, shoot, where I live, there's all kinda road riding. My standard "All I've got is a little over an hour and I have to get out now!!" ride is to ride from my house and climb up Lookout Mountain. I live about 2 miles from the base of the climb and it's a great trainer for many cyclists around the area. It winds up around the mountain, there's a little loop at the top, and then you bomb it back down. It's a great ride. In fact, usually there's more road bikes than cars on it, and the few cars that drive it are pretty much tourists or driving students. No kidding. From gate to grave (the standard "timing" points on the ride, there's a gate at the bottom of the mountain and Buffalo Bill's grave at the top) my best time is 28:35. Not great, but not bad for a newbie.

    Also, there's an entire bike path system throughout the city. You can literally ride an 80 mile loop on your road bike from Golden, south to Littleton, east to Denver, north to Northglen, and west back to Golden with pretty much zero road, all bike path. It's really cool how they've maintained such a great bike system around these parts.

    I still have to figure out the other mountain road rides that are close or worth doing. Like I said, I do it for training so Lookout fits the bill pretty well. But next spring I'm signing up for the Triple Bypass. It's some roadie race that's considered a must do for some freaking reason. I'll check it out and see what all the hullabaloo's about.

    PS: PVC glue is evil.

  5. #5
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    Hubby and I are buying each other road bikes for Christmas. We've been mountain biking for almost a year now, and while I really enjoy it, he prefers to ride on the road. Any bike ride is a good ride from my perspecive, so I'm more than happy to do a road ride with him on Saturdays and go exploring on my MTB on Sundays. At the moment we just ride our MTBs on the road, but you've gotta have the rights tools for the job IMO, and I persuaded him to add another two bikes to our collection (muahahaha! ). I'll be sure to let you all know what bikes we get and how they turn out

    - Jen.
    - Jen.

  6. #6
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Oh, shoot, where I live, there's all kinda road riding. My standard "All I've got is a little over an hour and I have to get out now!!" ride is to ride from my house and climb up Lookout Mountain. I live about 2 miles from the base of the climb and it's a great trainer for many cyclists around the area. It winds up around the mountain, there's a little loop at the top, and then you bomb it back down. It's a great ride. In fact, usually there's more road bikes than cars on it, and the few cars that drive it are pretty much tourists or driving students. No kidding. From gate to grave (the standard "timing" points on the ride, there's a gate at the bottom of the mountain and Buffalo Bill's grave at the top) my best time is 28:35. Not great, but not bad for a newbie.

    Also, there's an entire bike path system throughout the city. You can literally ride an 80 mile loop on your road bike from Golden, south to Littleton, east to Denver, north to Northglen, and west back to Golden with pretty much zero road, all bike path. It's really cool how they've maintained such a great bike system around these parts.

    I still have to figure out the other mountain road rides that are close or worth doing. Like I said, I do it for training so Lookout fits the bill pretty well. But next spring I'm signing up for the Triple Bypass. It's some roadie race that's considered a must do for some freaking reason. I'll check it out and see what all the hullabaloo's about.

    PS: PVC glue is evil.

    fascinating. I'm a used to live in Golden a long time ago person ( 80-84) Our idea of a mountain bike ride was to take newspaper bikes up table mountain, and I logged lots and lots of road miles between Golden and Arvada on farm roads; I imagine it's all houses now. Funnest ride ever was being on the back of my housemate's tandem, up and back down golden gate canyon , 60 mph on the descent...

    formica

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Roadies suck.

    Even so, it's hellaciously good for mtb training, makes you strong as an ox, and does (believe it or not) get fricking fun as soon as you learn how to handle a road bike. Also, there's a whole nuther zen thing that goes on in road biking. I think it has to do with the sustained, high, and steady heart rates you get going?

    I still strictly road bike to improve and train for my mountain biking. That said, I have learned to enjoy it a lot more than I ever expected ...

    Oh, and PS: You have no freaking idea just how fast you can go on a bike if you haven't yet road biked. Scary, scary fast. That too improves your mtb skills. You're able to go WFO with a lot more confidence.

    Oh, and PPS: To forkboy, thanks again for all the tips. You got me dialed in right, early, and now I pass lots of folks on the descents. Cars too!!
    I have a Heckler that I put road slicks on. In Japan the woods get a little over grown with vines and then the spiders make nice webs crossing all the good single track...so this year instead of fighting the webs and branches....I got some slicks and have been doing a lot of road riding. I am not sold on buying a road bike...but I do have fun passing roadies on my Heckler. I average about 45 miles per ride and it has been a good way to keep pedaling until our trails clear up.

  8. #8
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    Road biking is tons of fun. and addicting. and it makes you stronger.

    I started mountain biking a few years ago and got a road bike to help me with my endurance and for something to do during the week as all the trails near me are about 45min to an hour away. Needless to say, the mountain bike has gotten less and less action over time. This season I've been on the mountain bike 4 times. I've ride the road bike 5-6 days a week. I can't imagine life without a road bike....

    Sarah

  9. #9
    hari kari
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawboy8
    I have a Heckler that I put road slicks on. In Japan the woods get a little over grown with vines and then the spiders make nice webs crossing all the good single track...so this year instead of fighting the webs and branches....I got some slicks and have been doing a lot of road riding. I am not sold on buying a road bike...but I do have fun passing roadies on my Heckler. I average about 45 miles per ride and it has been a good way to keep pedaling until our trails clear up.
    Glad you're passing up roadies, but slicks do not equal a road bike. The geometry and agility of a good road bike feels pretty amazing. Not putting down what you're doing, just letting you know you haven't experienced road biking yet, and until you do you won't be open to being sold on the idea.

    I highly recommend it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Glad you're passing up roadies, but slicks do not equal a road bike. The geometry and agility of a good road bike feels pretty amazing. Not putting down what you're doing, just letting you know you haven't experienced road biking yet, and until you do you won't be open to being sold on the idea.

    I highly recommend it.
    I have a buddy that I might borrow one from....who knows. I like dirt though.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawboy8
    I have a buddy that I might borrow one from....who knows. I like dirt though.
    I prefer the dirt too.

    I had a gorgeous custom Italian road bike and road riding just never felt fun to me at all - all of the work and virtually none of the enjoyment. Of course, the places I had to ride (Alabama and SLC) aren't great for road riding. People in Alabama looked at you like they'd never seen a bicycle before - I actually had multiple people roll down a window to ask what I was doing, and a few honk and yell for me to get off the road (and I'm the type that hugs the side of the road as far over as is possible). And SLC drivers are just downright dangerous - I've never lived anywhere with such oblivious people all driving SUVs. So I sold it. I felt like I was risking my life every time I tried riding. I'll stick with racing DH. At least then I'm the one responsible for my injuries.

    I think if I lived somewhere that had paved bike paths or somewhere safe to ride, I'd think about getting another one. But short of that, I'd rather go to the gym when I just want to work out.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by connie
    I prefer the dirt too.

    I had a gorgeous custom Italian road bike and road riding just never felt fun to me at all - all of the work and virtually none of the enjoyment. Of course, the places I had to ride (Alabama and SLC) aren't great for road riding. People in Alabama looked at you like they'd never seen a bicycle before - I actually had multiple people roll down a window to ask what I was doing, and a few honk and yell for me to get off the road (and I'm the type that hugs the side of the road as far over as is possible). And SLC drivers are just downright dangerous - I've never lived anywhere with such oblivious people all driving SUVs. So I sold it. I felt like I was risking my life every time I tried riding. I'll stick with racing DH. At least then I'm the one responsible for my injuries.

    I think if I lived somewhere that had paved bike paths or somewhere safe to ride, I'd think about getting another one. But short of that, I'd rather go to the gym when I just want to work out.

    Riding in the dirt is so much more fun. Like you said...at least your injuries are your fault. Everytime I have went on a road ride....on of my buddies crashes into to someone. The first time he crashed into an old lady on a basket bike. He was mad and I said "dude....settle down and tell her your sorry" (he has little mans disease and get cranky alot). Poor lady held her knee and whimpered something in japanese, he then said something to her...and she smiled and got up and took off. The next time he ran into a teen age girl...and agian needed calming down. Both times they came out of no where and there was no way to keep from crashing. At least if you crash on dirt, your doing something cool. I would rather take my chances with trees and rocks...than take them with cars and trucks.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    I still strictly road bike to improve and train for my mountain biking. That said, I have learned to enjoy it a lot more than I ever expected ...

    Oh, and PPS: To forkboy, thanks again for all the tips. You got me dialed in right, early, and now I pass lots of folks on the descents. Cars too!!

    {{in an Elementary school sing-song voice}}

    You're turning into a ROADIE
    You're turning into a ROADIE

    Hello Kitty sitting in a tree

    With her Road B - I - K - E

    Now you just have to get used to shaving your legs.

    Glad to be of help!

  14. #14
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    Try flat bar road bikes

    To anyone who has a "so, so" experience on the road, I would recommend flat bars on your road bike. Duplicate, as close as possible, your position on your mountain bike. To some folks, the drop bars and the position they put you in is just too unwieldy. I know people who have thought about giving up road riding but after changing to a flat bar set up, have renewed interest. Road bikes are just so much fun because of the speed and distance you can cover!

  15. #15
    Linoleum Knife
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    I still have to figure out the other mountain road rides that are close or worth doing. Like I said, I do it for training so Lookout fits the bill pretty well. But next spring I'm signing up for the Triple Bypass. It's some roadie race that's considered a must do for some freaking reason. I'll check it out and see what all the hullabaloo's about.
    Check out Lefthand Canyon. Start at Boulder, take 36 north, hang a left at Lefthand Canyon road, and ride up to Ward.

    The last mile is a 10% grade. Bring your big legs, and leave the skinny ones at home.

    If you want to do an overnight, continue on to Estes.

    I'm down for the Triple next year as well. I've ridden 2 of the 3 passes already, but not on the same day. Loveland Pass is a hoot.

    You should come down for the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic next year. It's a great time. It's a race, but only the Pro / Cat1 / Cat2 are really "racing". Everybody else is just trying to survive.

    You know the next step is to find a club to ride with. Once you can go up the hill and down the hill, you should try it with a pack of 30 other yahoos. That's when the REAL fun starts.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssmike
    To anyone who has a "so, so" experience on the road, I would recommend flat bars on your road bike. Duplicate, as close as possible, your position on your mountain bike. To some folks, the drop bars and the position they put you in is just too unwieldy. I know people who have thought about giving up road riding but after changing to a flat bar set up, have renewed interest. Road bikes are just so much fun because of the speed and distance you can cover!
    what will flat bars do to get rid of the idiots throwing firecrackers and water balloons,and the latte-crazed cell phone wielding Expedition drivers who think they own the road? Not much, I'm afraid.

    fromcia

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica
    what will flat bars do to get rid of the idiots throwing firecrackers and water balloons,and the latte-crazed cell phone wielding Expedition drivers who think they own the road? Not much, I'm afraid.

    fromcia
    The original poster was more concerned about the bike and how it feels - that's what I was addressing. And if you are more comfortable on the bike you will be more confident to deal with latte-crazed drivers.

  18. #18
    abc
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    Give it another try

    Quote Originally Posted by beegirl
    I am just a beginner at mountain biking and have been trying to get my friends to join in. My friend/boss always tries to get me to get a road bike and ride with her. Today I went on my first road ride and borrowed a very nice Specialized bike. I definitely had an appreciation for the bike, very lightweight and efficient. I think the size and everything were okay, but it just felt so odd. We only went about 7.5 miles. The first half of the ride I felt very nervous. It didn't help that I had no idea how to shift and my shoelace came loose and got grabbed by the chain. While figuring out how to shift, I almost hit the curb. By the second half of the ride I was a little more comfortable and actually ended up doing okay. What do you think, should I give it more of a chance? I feel way more comfortable mountain biking, but don't want to be close minded. P.S. You can tell what I am wanting to hear by the fact that I posted here and not on a road bike forum.
    Although I'm known to my roadie friends as THE mtn biker, I rode both road and dirt from the very begining (10+ year ago, before mtn bike was even "fashionable"). It's actually a little hard for me to figure out why some people only enjoy one of them! (e.g. Most of my roadie friends whine about a 50 yard stretch of dirt road!)

    I'm trying to get a sense as to what make you so "nervous" and "uncomfortable" riding on the road. The bike? The road? The scary looking skinny tires? Or the cars whizzing by inches away?

    In any case, I think you should give it a second try. I think your first ride isn't a very good introduction. If I were taking my friends riding on a strange bike, I would have had them figure out the shifting in the parking lot before hitting the road. That's just me. Some of the problems (shoelace) doesn't seem to be related to road bike at all. It could have happened on a mtn bike just as well. But it contributed to your "nervousness" on that first road ride. Or maybe your friend/boss pushed you too hard and too fast on that first ride? Seems to me a 7.5 mile ride on the road is awfully short for someone accustom to riding off road to get a REAL feel of what road ride feels like. You probably haven't even warmed up!

    You may or may not really dig road riding. But you owe it to yourself to give it a fair chance by trying it a couple times before you give it up.

  19. #19
    Slothful dirt hippie
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    A day on a bike is a GREAT day, I don't even care what flavor of riding it happens to be.

    Road bikes are a gift from heaven for long point-A-to-point-B rides. In my case, that includes commuting (20 miles 1 way) or shopping (10 miles 1 way), where the extra 3-5 mph really adds up. It's also a great chance to practice my stroke, think about life, etc. For practicality on our chipseal and gravel strewn country roads, I have a Surly Crosscheck (cyclocross bike) with wider knobbies mounted... I found they were only fractionally slower than slicks, but significantly more comfortable and certainly more useful. And if I get a wild hair, I can do a little off-roading with it too.

    But Lance Armstrong I obviously aint.... I leave the whole hard-core rodie racing and training thing to others.

  20. #20
    abc
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    Much easier...

    Quote Originally Posted by ssmike
    The original poster was more concerned about the bike and how it feels - that's what I was addressing. And if you are more comfortable on the bike you will be more confident to deal with latte-crazed drivers.
    Whatever happen to the old-fashion advice of:

    Put a pair of skinny tires on the existing mtn bike. Instant (flat bar) road bike!

    (ok, 10 min.!)

  21. #21
    hari kari
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    Quote Originally Posted by forkboy
    Check out Lefthand Canyon. Start at Boulder, take 36 north, hang a left at Lefthand Canyon road, and ride up to Ward.

    The last mile is a 10% grade. Bring your big legs, and leave the skinny ones at home.

    If you want to do an overnight, continue on to Estes.

    I'm down for the Triple next year as well. I've ridden 2 of the 3 passes already, but not on the same day. Loveland Pass is a hoot.

    You should come down for the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic next year. It's a great time. It's a race, but only the Pro / Cat1 / Cat2 are really "racing". Everybody else is just trying to survive.

    You know the next step is to find a club to ride with. Once you can go up the hill and down the hill, you should try it with a pack of 30 other yahoos. That's when the REAL fun starts.
    Thanks, I'll do it! You're now my official road bike mentor, and I trust your judgment implicitly. I'll also check out Lefthand Canyon and let you know how it goes.

    Very cool that you're doing the triple next year. I think there's some lottery to get in the damn thing?? But I was going to black flag it and ride it whether I'm officially in it or not.

    Oh, and lastly, thanks for the tip on the leg shaving. I promise to give it a go. As an mtb rider, heretofore, it's been all about wax.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by abc
    I'm trying to get a sense as to what make you so "nervous" and "uncomfortable" riding on the road. The bike? The road? The scary looking skinny tires? Or the cars whizzing by inches away?
    Yes, yes, yes and yes. I just felt like I was in a weird position, perched up in the air. On my MTB, I feel more aware of my surroundings and more in control. On the road bike I felt like an accident waiting to happen. I felt more comfortable riding with my hands on the top/horizontal part of the bar, except that there are no brakes there. I think I will try it again since I was starting to catch on by the end. If it still feels weird, I think the flatbar idea may be for me. What about these type of bikes?: http://www.giantbicycles.com/us/030....2005&range=197

  23. #23
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    Sorry Kitty, I got grammatically lazy.

    What is your road bike? What gets to stable next to the lovely Yeti? Do you appreciate the sweet performance of the new steel? The snappy (yet punishing) ride aluminium? The awesome damping of carbon?

    Do you have a solid, utilitarian Shimano grouppo? Or the sexiness of Campy?

    That was what I meant to ask.

  24. #24
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    A lot easier

    Quote Originally Posted by beegirl
    Yes, yes, yes and yes. I just felt like I was in a weird position, perched up in the air. On my MTB, I feel more aware of my surroundings and more in control. On the road bike I felt like an accident waiting to happen. I felt more comfortable riding with my hands on the top/horizontal part of the bar, except that there are no brakes there. I think I will try it again since I was starting to catch on by the end. If it still feels weird, I think the flatbar idea may be for me. What about these type of bikes?: http://www.giantbicycles.com/us/030....2005&range=197
    Have you tried riding your mtn bike on the road to see if you can deal with the cars whizzing by part? I can't blame you for not liking the cars. I don't either. I wish they're not there. So I seek out roads with less traffic to ride on.

    Couple of other issues I can identify. And a couple of suggestions to deal with them:

    1) "I just felt like I was in a weird position, perched up in the air."

    Mmmm... It's normal to feel "weird". But I'm not sure about the "up in the air" part. I suspect you got a bike that's too big for you. Just because you can stradle the top tube doesn't garantee it's the right size. Read on...

    2) "I felt more comfortable riding with my hands on the top/horizontal part of the bar, except that there are no brakes there."

    Two possible reason of that. Either you found the brake lever too far forward to reach on that road bike, or you like to have your elbows out like on a mtn bike .

    If you find it uncomfortable to reach the brake lever, you need a bike with a shorter top tube. i.e. a smaller size bike!
    If it's the later (you like your elbows out), a flat bar is what you need.

    Either way, you SHOULD be able to reach the brake comfortably.

    Here's one suggestion: instead of plugging down a few hundred to try out a flat bar road bike, spend $40 to get a pair of slick tires to put on your mtn bike's wheels.

    This way, you get to ride a bike that you're familiar with, flat bar, same position. Now you only have to deal with the skinny tires and the cars whizzing by part!

  25. #25
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    I will always and forever consider myself a mtn. biker. I never take my road bike on road trip (poor thing). I'll tell ya though, theres something about the smoothness of the road. The rhythm you swing into on a long,long climb. The way the tires grab the pavement when you carve a turn going downhill at 40+. The gradient suddenly shooting up to 14% on an uphill turn and suddenly youre out of the saddle flying around the corner like something has grabbed you. You don't have to think about your front wheel lifting or the rear wheel losing traction. There's just this sensation of smoothness.*sigh*
    But give me stream crossings and golden aspens and deep dark woods with rocky singletrack and a thunderstorm bearing down on you anyday!!!! I love them both but sometimes,unfortunately, the road bike is easier. Out the door, 50 miles as opposed to loading up the car and schlepping to the trailhead. I don't have the luxury of having trails out my door but I do have nice road riding! I have nice trails too, if I wanna drive. Which I don't always.
    WWXD.
    What would Xena do?
    She used to clean the whole trail.

  26. #26
    hari kari
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    Quote Originally Posted by kept man
    Sorry Kitty, I got grammatically lazy.

    What is your road bike? What gets to stable next to the lovely Yeti? Do you appreciate the sweet performance of the new steel? The snappy (yet punishing) ride aluminium? The awesome damping of carbon?

    Do you have a solid, utilitarian Shimano grouppo? Or the sexiness of Campy?

    That was what I meant to ask.
    My goodness. So many ways to answer this question. But it's early. And I'm in need of coffee ...

    Actually, it was a gift. Ever get a gift you didn't want, and then wound up loving? That's a good gift. I got it for Christmas last year. Needless to say, I'm new into the sport and neither need, nor have earned, a road bike of very high caliber. But I got a great entry level bike, it's a LeMond Zurich with standard specs, (ultegra, bontrager wheel set). But it is mostly carbon, with steel, and I splurged for the aftermarket carbon handle bar (... "W" or some brand like that?? Still, it makes me laugh, what, with the two bright yellow Ws blazing on the bar...). So far I like the awesome damping of carbon. I think? I'm still rather clueless on this scene and not sure what I'm feeling, what's "good" and what's "bad." I'm figuring it out though.

    And yes, it was spec'd with a triple, but I promise I refuse to use the little gear and the thing has not been used. I swear!! In fact, I'm having it taken off (assuming the limit stop can be adjusted sufficiently in response?) just to make sure there are no freaking misunderstandings. It's downright embarrassing having that thing on there.

    So this bike will suit me for quite some time, but I did stop by Yeti a few days ago and man oh man do they have some beautiful bikes in their factory. I checked out the new 303 (their new DH rig) and will probably take that for a test ride in a week or so. Yeti's so cool. They'll let you demo their bikes at no charge, on real live trails! They give you free decals for your spin bikes! They'll give you a tour of their factory whenever you stop by!

    Anyway, I digress, but my next road bike, or mtb bike, whichever comes first, will still likely be a Yeti. Gorgeous, awesome bikes, and I absolutely adore the company.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    My goodness. So many ways to answer this question. But it's early. And I'm in need of coffee ...

    Actually, it was a gift. Ever get a gift you didn't want, and then wound up loving? That's a good gift. I got it for Christmas last year. Needless to say, I'm new into the sport and neither need, nor have earned, a road bike of very high caliber. But I got a great entry level bike, it's a LeMond Zurich with standard specs, (ultegra, bontrager wheel set). But it is mostly carbon, with steel, and I splurged for the aftermarket carbon handle bar (... "W" or some brand like that?? Still, it makes me laugh, what, with the two bright yellow Ws blazing on the bar...). So far I like the awesome damping of carbon. I think? I'm still rather clueless on this scene and not sure what I'm feeling, what's "good" and what's "bad." I'm figuring it out though.

    And yes, it was spec'd with a triple, but I promise I refuse to use the little gear and the thing has not been used. I swear!! In fact, I'm having it taken off (assuming the limit stop can be adjusted sufficiently in response?) just to make sure there are no freaking misunderstandings. It's downright embarrassing having that thing on there.

    So this bike will suit me for quite some time, but I did stop by Yeti a few days ago and man oh man do they have some beautiful bikes in their factory. I checked out the new 303 (their new DH rig) and will probably take that for a test ride in a week or so. Yeti's so cool. They'll let you demo their bikes at no charge, on real live trails! They give you free decals for your spin bikes! They'll give you a tour of their factory whenever you stop by!

    Anyway, I digress, but my next road bike, or mtb bike, whichever comes first, will still likely be a Yeti. Gorgeous, awesome bikes, and I absolutely adore the company.

    I have an ASX...it's Raw. Thought I'd tell you that. That 303 looks sweet...I want one.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawboy8
    I have an ASX...it's Raw. Thought I'd tell you that. That 303 looks sweet...I want one.
    Well, sweet's not the word that comes to my mind, but holy mother of God the 303 is an amazingly hot bike. I'll be sure to type up a review.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Well, sweet's not the word that comes to my mind, but holy mother of God the 303 is an amazingly hot bike. I'll be sure to type up a review.


    I really like my DH-9...but that 303 is making me want one. I really like the guys at Yeti too. My DH-9 cracked on the lower pinch bolt connecting the swing arm and front triangle. I wrote to them and told them about it....sent some photo's...and in no time at all they responded with "it looks like a warranty issue....send it in". Within a couple of weeks I had a brand new frame. Because they took care of me, 3 more guys I ride with here have bought Yeti bikes.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Thanks, I'll do it! You're now my official road bike mentor, and I trust your judgment implicitly.
    Therin lies the road to eternal damnation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Very cool that you're doing the triple next year. I think there's some lottery to get in the damn thing?? But I was going to black flag it and ride it whether I'm officially in it or not.
    I hadn't heard that it was a lottery - from their website it looks like they'll take anyone stupid enough to pay to ride it. I've meant to do it for 2 years now, but keep finding some lame excuse at the last moment. I think it's worth doing it legally just for the god-awful ugly jersey they give you.

  31. #31
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    The Tripple Bypass is excellent fun! You'll have a blast..

    Another great ride is to head over Lookout and climb to evergeen. You have to ride on 70 for a short while, but the shoulder is huge. From there you can loop back down through Morrison, or you can keep climbing over the first pass of the triple bypass (can't remember the name), and sometimes just rock on up Mt. Evans (gotta start early and watch the weather).

    another nice loop from you neck o the woods, over Lookout through Mt Vernon descend the access road to the next exit (I think), cross south under I70, and there is a hard-packed dirt road (watch out for the stutter bumps) that will drop you out in Idledale, through Morrison (a definite pedalling descent) and then back home.

    more stuff (I miss the road riding there almost as much as I miss the mtbing)..

    go south into morrison (your choice of routes), in morrison, head to the west side of town and take 8 south (there's an open space here ith a fun climb, but I can't remember the name) go past a well-known restaurant, turn left and go under 285, climb up into a newer (15years) housing development and either head east on Belleview and then back north on the Bike path along the highway (470) up to Bear Creek and then back home or keep going south, linking the developments (nice roads, wide shoulders/bike lanes) down to Lockheed. Then you can head back or climb deer creek. The first option (morrison/8/bike path) is a great winter ride, you don't go up into the mountains, the roads stay clear, protected from the wind, mostly rolling with a few steeps. The 285 underpass is the site of ym worst crash ever.

    also,the schwab cycling team (anyone welcome) used to meet regularly on the weekends (10 amish?) near coors and ride up around Stanley Lake,maybe 2-3 hours. Good people, some intensity, mostly cardio, riding with others make the winter much more bearable.

    and, if you're interested in riding with another woman (and sometimes her husband who is ungodly strong), my best friend lives in Golden and rides mtbs (strong climber, little timid on rough descents) and road bikes (pretty strong all around) and sure that she'd love to meet someone else to ride with..

    have fun
    Last edited by sportsman; 09-20-2005 at 08:13 AM.
    "The search for a perfect pint should take lifetime." M.Jackson

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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by forkboy
    I hadn't heard that it was a lottery - from their website it looks like they'll take anyone stupid enough to pay to ride it. I've meant to do it for 2 years now, but keep finding some lame excuse at the last moment. I think it's worth doing it legally just for the god-awful ugly jersey they give you.
    nope - no lottery - just sign up and ride. I've done it 2 times and have found (even though I pay for the thing) that it's best to use your own support.

    The feed stations get crazy crowded and it can take a long time to fill your water bottles and get food. Plus it's more motiviating to know your friends are waiting to cheer you on and take care of you.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty

    And yes, it was spec'd with a triple, but I promise I refuse to use the little gear and the thing has not been used. I swear!! In fact, I'm having it taken off (assuming the limit stop can be adjusted sufficiently in response?) just to make sure there are no freaking misunderstandings. It's downright embarrassing having that thing on there.
    .
    if you ever think that you're going to do the Mike Horgan Hillclimb from Boulder to Mt. Eldora (or the Mt. Evans hill climb, bith good races) then you might want to consider keeping that triple and derailler in a box for easy access)

    Something else I'd recommend (if you're yanking the triple off and replacing it) any future road bikes that I or my gf buys will have a compact crank. 34/50 up front and an 11-whatever in the back will have you blazing up the passes with a smile on your face, and you only lose 1 top end gear.
    "The search for a perfect pint should take lifetime." M.Jackson

    Ride bikes, not goats. Just good advice

  34. #34
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    Hello Kitty

    Are you the Hello Kitty I roade with in July at White Ranch when I first moved to Colorado? If so, I've finally acclimatized and now can breathe on all the climbs out here. I tried to email you but not sure if I had your address right.

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    Triple Chainrings

    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    My goodness. So many ways to answer this question. But it's early. And I'm in need of coffee ...

    Actually, it was a gift. Ever get a gift you didn't want, and then wound up loving? That's a good gift. I got it for Christmas last year. Needless to say, I'm new into the sport and neither need, nor have earned, a road bike of very high caliber. But I got a great entry level bike, it's a LeMond Zurich with standard specs, (ultegra, bontrager wheel set). But it is mostly carbon, with steel, and I splurged for the aftermarket carbon handle bar (... "W" or some brand like that?? Still, it makes me laugh, what, with the two bright yellow Ws blazing on the bar...). So far I like the awesome damping of carbon. I think? I'm still rather clueless on this scene and not sure what I'm feeling, what's "good" and what's "bad." I'm figuring it out though.

    And yes, it was spec'd with a triple, but I promise I refuse to use the little gear and the thing has not been used. I swear!! In fact, I'm having it taken off (assuming the limit stop can be adjusted sufficiently in response?) just to make sure there are no freaking misunderstandings. It's downright embarrassing having that thing on there.

    So this bike will suit me for quite some time, but I did stop by Yeti a few days ago and man oh man do they have some beautiful bikes in their factory. I checked out the new 303 (their new DH rig) and will probably take that for a test ride in a week or so. Yeti's so cool. They'll let you demo their bikes at no charge, on real live trails! They give you free decals for your spin bikes! They'll give you a tour of their factory whenever you stop by!

    Anyway, I digress, but my next road bike, or mtb bike, whichever comes first, will still likely be a Yeti. Gorgeous, awesome bikes, and I absolutely adore the company.
    Come up to the Boulder/Lyons area and try to ride Lefthand Canyon, Flagstaff Road, Old Stage Road or Lee Hill Road WITHOUT the triple. These roads present some serious steep climbs. If you can ride them with a double, expecially in the context of a 50 or 60 mile ride, you are a truly awesome rider. I for one am not ashamed of having a triple out on these roads.

  36. #36
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    givr it another chance

    Seriously, if you don't you'll never know what you're missing. The uncomfortable issue with the bars/positioning will go away as you get used to it. You will learn to love the handling of the bike as well as the speed.......now traffic is another story.
    Don't forget the convenoence of being able to walk out your front door and hop on and ride.........

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    In fact, I'm having it taken off (assuming the limit stop can be adjusted sufficiently in response?) just to make sure there are no freaking misunderstandings.
    I wouldn't bet your life on it, but I think you'll have to spring for new cranks, shifters (since they are generally sold in pairs) and a front derailleur to avoid the emabrrasment of being seen riding a triple on the road.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by forkboy
    Therin lies the road to eternal damnation.



    I hadn't heard that it was a lottery - from their website it looks like they'll take anyone stupid enough to pay to ride it. I've meant to do it for 2 years now, but keep finding some lame excuse at the last moment. I think it's worth doing it legally just for the god-awful ugly jersey they give you.
    I'm a bone head, I confused the Triple Bypass with Ride the Rockies. D'uh!

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by IttyBittyBetty
    Are you the Hello Kitty I roade with in July at White Ranch when I first moved to Colorado? If so, I've finally acclimatized and now can breathe on all the climbs out here. I tried to email you but not sure if I had your address right.
    Nope, not me. At least I don't think so. I don't remember meeting anybody at WR in July, and certainly don't recall introducing myself as Hello Kitty if I did. (I do wear this mongo big pink and white Hello Kitty wrist watch that's pretty hard to miss, though. Hahaha.) Scarily, it appears we're beginning to have a bit of a Hello Kitty epidemic in the mtbr world. I needs me a new gig, soon.

    But thanks to you, and sportsman, for the advice on the road routes. Much appreciated.

  40. #40
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    Those are great shots of a Yeti. We don't see many here in SoCal. Kinda shot my memory back to the Julie Furtado/Missy Giove days. uh-oh..dating myself!
    WWXD.
    What would Xena do?
    She used to clean the whole trail.

  41. #41
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    Hello Kitty

    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Nope, not me. At least I don't think so. I don't remember meeting anybody at WR in July, and certainly don't recall introducing myself as Hello Kitty if I did. (I do wear this mongo big pink and white Hello Kitty wrist watch that's pretty hard to miss, though. Hahaha.) Scarily, it appears we're beginning to have a bit of a Hello Kitty epidemic in the mtbr world. I needs me a new gig, soon.

    But thanks to you, and sportsman, for the advice on the road routes. Much appreciated.
    Strange coincidence with the moniker! I roade with another woman from the Louisville area who's email addy had "hello kitty" in it.

    But on the road ride suggestions, there's a great ride up to Ward that I do. From my house in Gunbarrel, it's about 50 miles. There's an Open Space trailhead located off of Lee Hill Drive in north Boulder. If you start there and head up Lee Hill to the split with Old Stage Road; you can veer left and stay on Lee Hill if you like really steep climbs or veer right onto Old Stage if you like kinda steep climbs. Both roads will come to Left Hand Canyon Drive. Go left/west onto Left Hand Canyon Drive, which is a very pretty road with a nice amount of space on the berm for bikes. This road will eventually take you up to the funky town of Ward; the last mile or so is very steep. At the top, there's a convenience store where you can buy food/fluids or just hang out and relax. You can turn around and go back the way you came (coming down Lee Hill Drive is a blast!).

    Although I've not done this yet, if you're feeling burly, from ward you can head south on the Peak-to-Peak Highway down to CR-52 to Sunshine Canton or down to Boulder Canyon Drive, going east on either route off of the Peak-to-Peak. Both CO-52/Sunshine and Boulder Canyon will take you into Boulder itself and you wil have to ride back up north again for your car. Check it out on a map.

  42. #42
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    IBB

    You need to find the Fruit Loops ride (if you don't know it already) more good stuff from Boulder..
    "The search for a perfect pint should take lifetime." M.Jackson

    Ride bikes, not goats. Just good advice

  43. #43
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by sportsman
    IBB

    You need to find the Fruit Loops ride (if you don't know it already) more good stuff from Boulder..
    It's rare I get up to Boulder, so how about spilling the beans. I'd drive up there for a good ride.
    I have one firm belief about the American political system, God is a Republican and Santa Claus is a Democrat P.J. O'Rourke





  44. #44
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    Holy Crap!

    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    Well, sweet's not the word that comes to my mind, but holy mother of God the 303 is an amazingly hot bike. I'll be sure to type up a review.


    Are you getting that bike? Sick (in a good way)!!
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jewell of D(enial)
    Are you getting that bike? Sick (in a good way)!!
    No, I'm just demo-ing it for kicks. At heart I'm a xc junkie and can't in good conscience strap a bike on a chair lift. Who knows ... the DH bug might just bite one day, and if it does, the 303 may be just too hot not to buy.

    She is gorgeous.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by sandan
    It's rare I get up to Boulder, so how about spilling the beans. I'd drive up there for a good ride.

    okay, it isn't worth tripping to Boulder just to ride the Fruit Loops, but if you're going to do a ride from Boulder (or, in my case it was from Golden) then the Fruit Loops are good, nice winter ride when the mountains are too cold/snowy/gravelly/icy and you;re tired of the traditional ride arounf Carter lake..

    from Boulder, take your favorite route to Lyons

    from lyons there are 2 loops, one south and west making a loop with old st vrain road and st vrain highway ( ithink that his goes by Hall ranch, which I had never ridden when I lived there) the other loop (and ride namesake) is a loop to the north formed by Apple Valley road and 36.

    This makes a nice ride especially when it includes hygiene (watch for cops, stop at the stop sign). If you need more detail and noone there knows the route, let me know and I'll mapquest up a good route..
    "The search for a perfect pint should take lifetime." M.Jackson

    Ride bikes, not goats. Just good advice

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty

    And yes, it was spec'd with a triple, but I promise I refuse to use the little gear and the thing has not been used. I swear!! In fact, I'm having it taken off (assuming the limit stop can be adjusted sufficiently in response?) just to make sure there are no freaking misunderstandings. It's downright embarrassing having that thing on there.

    .
    I love my triple. Don't take yours off! Love being a little different. That would be crazy to live in CO with all those mountains and not have a triple. I don't have real strong legs and many a time up a steep hill I have spun my triple granny gear past riders burning out in their smallest double ring gear. My motto is never run out of gears - although I am thinking about converting one of my older HT's to a SS.

    I mostly use my road bike for mellow rides when I don't have the energy to go mtbing so my triple gets well used

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairyweatherider
    Love being a little different. That would be crazy to live in CO with all those mountains and not have a triple. I don't have real strong legs and many a time up a steep hill I have spun my triple granny gear past riders burning out in their smallest double ring gear.
    OK, before, I was simply embarrassed to have that thing on there. But after fairy's post, ya'll can officially downgrade me to humiliated.
    Last edited by Hello Kitty; 09-22-2005 at 05:41 AM.

  49. #49
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    I love both my roadbike and mtnbike - warm fuzzies abound, bahahaha - however, I tend to fall off my mtnbike regularly and seemingly whilst on my roadbike become aggro towards suv drivers who can't get the feck off the phone and come too close to nailing me on my bike and/or killing lil kiddies on theirs... grrrr...

    oh well

    blk

    PS FOAMY FREAKN' ROCKS, HK!!!!!!! My gawd, I feel like your stalker already
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  50. #50
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    LeMond Zurich...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hello Kitty
    OK, before, I was simply embarrassed to have that thing on there. But after fairy's post, ya'll can officially downgrade me to humiliated.

    ...not necessarily entry level. The wheels are probably the closest to that claim but overall the bike is a sweet ride. I ride a Buenos Aires which is closer to entry level and like the ride of steel/carbon. Sure there are a lot of other "higher end" or should I say higher priced bikes out there but you have a good one. As to the triple - it looks weird but there is a reason for it. I ride with a double but compact set of gears for some hills and I don't come anywhere near to the mountains or elevations you are talking about in SoCal. I bet I would have a triple living there.
    don't question why you ride but rather why you don't ride more.

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