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  1. #1
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    emergency stuff in your camelback

    just finished a ride and there was a runner who we found down. He was down for 2 hours and luckily we came across him, as he was on a rogue trail in the gulch and it gets dark quick up there. He was calling out for help, but was far enough that nobody heard him. Luckily we heard him and knew where to look. He had no cell phone and he was a visitor, unfamiliar with our trails. I always carry a whistle for that reason, as I've been injured a couple times and needed help out. Here are the top things in my cambelback.

    cell phone
    alien tool/tube/patch kit/link/pump
    zip ties
    bandaids/ointment/eye drops, extra contacts/percocet and ibu
    whistle/head lamp
    cliff bar
    handkerchief

    the only other thing I was thinking was tape for splinting and a leatherman, but it's so heavy. The bike computer was handy to give the rescue crew exact distance to wheel their gurney. If they were considering a heli-rescue, maybe a gps would help.

    Anyhow, got me thinking do you have in your camelback for these types of emergencies?

  2. #2
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    A friend of mine carries a track phone for 911 emergencies. He is cheap and just doesn't want to get into a contract which I understand, but track phones are not traceable and why they are so widely used by bad people.

    You might include a SOL emergency blanket to keep the guy warm.

    http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medi...vival+blankets

    Fire starter BlastMatch for warmth and a fire signal

    Amazon.com: Ultimate Survival Technologies BlastMatch Fire Starter (Black): Sports & Outdoors

  3. #3
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    cell phone
    emergency light (it's small but would get me out in a true emergency)
    matches/lighter
    bandages/tape
    duct tape
    small knife
    rescue wistle

  4. #4
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    I always have a folding knife and mini leatherman. Vetwrap tape (from a feed or big pet store) is versatile for holding bandages or taping ankles, and probably lightest for a given length. It sticks to itself but is not really sticky so you can re-position it easily. An extra layer is a must. One woman-specific tip is you are cold, say if you have to walk out or are hurt, is to remove that sweaty bra, as you will be warmer without it.

    I have only come across a bad bike accident once, a guy went OTB just after passing us and broke his fall with his face. Out cold, lots of blood and awful gurgling noises, pretty scarey. In that case, there was no cell service so all I used for supplies were my legs and bike to carry me to the ranger station, which luckily was not far away. My friend stayed with him and mostly provided moral support (and a few tissues) for him and his son, who came upon the scene and was in a panic. After a trip to the local hospital he was flown to a bigger one for facial reconstruction and was OK. It did inspire me to sign up for a first aid class, which I highly recommend.

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=kris7047th;10902941]A friend of mine carries a track phone for 911 emergencies. He is cheap and just doesn't want to get into a contract which I understand, but track phones are not traceable and why they are so widely used by bad people.

    You might include a SOL emergency blanket to keep the guy warm.

    Amazon.com: Adventure Medical Kits SOL Emergency Bivvy: Health & Personal Care


    I keep one of these in my bc ski pack- very light and takes up almost no space. Headlamp/light is a must for both my bike/ski packs. I've thought about adding a tourniquet after seeing that video of the downhiller lacerating his femoral artery (not that it would have helped in that situation).

  6. #6
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    ^^ I think that is the exact thing I carried for the winter trail commute I had for 1.5 winters, but you're right, it could be useful at any time of year to keep an injured person warm. I got it at Bean's Adventure Medical Kits S.O.L. Emergency Bivy: Emergency and First Aid | Free Shipping at L.L.Bean

    Another good item is some food you don't like very much. You won't poach it for a snack and it could give you energy if you get in over your head. Something that travels well and can sit in there for months.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Another good item is some food you don't like very much. You won't poach it for a snack and it could give you energy if you get in over your head. Something that travels well and can sit in there for months.
    I had this pack that my friends referred to as "the black hole" - I could fit so much stuff in there! I was digging through there on a ride one time and found a brownie that had been in there for at least a month.

    It was delicious.

    gabrielle
    Quote Originally Posted by Impy
    just plain unfriendly and maladjusted.
    "Yes, honey: I do love this bike more than I love you."

  8. #8
    the Dude memorial aviator
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    I have only come across a bad bike accident once, a guy went OTB just after passing us and broke his fall with his face. ... It did inspire me to sign up for a first aid class, which I highly recommend.
    Several years back, on a big group ride, a new guy fell into a ravine, broke a couple of ribs, and (we found out later) punctured a lung. Luckily we had an army medic, a nurse, and two WFRs with us, but it was still four hours before EMS got to him. I took the NOLS WFA class a few months after that, and have kept up with it since.

    Also: CPR. Us geezers may need to be resuscitated.

    So, off the top of my head, here's what I carry for busted-up people:
    gauze, lots of it
    that vet tape I can never remember the name of (it comes in camo, btw - makes a great gift!)
    drugs: aspirin, acetominophen, ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, pepto bismol, and immodium
    Fel's Naptha (soap that's really good at removing Uroshiol, the oil from Toxicodendron spp [Poison ivy, oak, and sumac] - you don't have to worry about this leaking like a bottle of Tecnu)
    tampons
    space blanket
    triangle bandage
    watch with second hand
    pen & paper
    I used to carry one of those ice-pack things, but decided it took up too much space. We can usually fashion something with creek water.

    Cell reception is not reliable where we usually ride, so I don't count on that.

    Typical other stuff:
    knife, firestarter, compass, blahblahblah.

    For busted-up bikes:
    tube, levers, patch kit, tire boot (piece of old inner tube), pump
    chain cracker (Park CT-5, don't leave home without it)
    master links for 9 and 10-speed
    tri-flow (you forget to lube your chain before the ride, this is what you get)
    derailleur hanger for my bike (yes really)
    shock pump
    kevlar spoke
    spoke wrench
    a couple of multi-tools, neither of which I'm really happy with
    zipties and duct tape
    various small screws eg cleat screws, even though I ride flats now, my friends still ride clipless. (I'm told cleat screws fit in the screwtaps for your bottle cage.)

    Yes my pack is heavy...yes I have used all of these things

    I've been carrying a folding saw since spring. Stuck it in the pack in case of blowdown and forgot to take it back out.

    Thing I'm not carrying, but should: my name & who to contact in case of emergency. Nobody knew the guy who fell into the ravine, and he wasn't in any shape to give us his contact info. It was kind of a mess.
    Quote Originally Posted by Impy
    just plain unfriendly and maladjusted.
    "Yes, honey: I do love this bike more than I love you."

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jewels View Post
    the only other thing I was thinking was tape for splinting and a leatherman, but it's so heavy.
    Thankfully I've never had to splint an actual injury (anyone who has, feel free to chime in). In the first aid classes I've taken, we've used whatever we had on hand to tie splints - triangle bandages, bandannas, spare clothing, etc.

    I'm wondering if the vet wrap tape (Coban, made by 3m, much cheaper at a ranch supply store if you have those) would be good for splinting. It's great for wrapping ankles and holding gauze on a messy wound.

    Regarding the heavy leatherman - yeah...that's one of the gaps in my toolkit, I don't have good pliers and it's because they're heavy. I've been eyeballing the Skeletool: Skeletool - Leatherman Multi-Tools and this one from Gerber: Crucial Multi-Tool - Green. I really only want them for the pliers, though. :/
    Quote Originally Posted by Impy
    just plain unfriendly and maladjusted.
    "Yes, honey: I do love this bike more than I love you."

  10. #10
    Now, THAT'S gonna hurt!
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    Aside from the usual field bike repair gear, I have a good Adventure Medical FAK and in addition, I carry 1 - 4" Israeli Bandage, Quik-Clot gauze pak, CAT, SAM Splint, and a space blanket. None of the items weigh much and it all fits with room to spare in Camelbak Hawg which I ALWAYS wear on rides and hikes.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    thx everyone, just added lighter,tape,der hanger and leatherman. looking at bivvy, is there anything smaller/lighter that's about the same thing? I'm in Hawaii so it won't get too cold, but will get wet. The rescue even made the online newspaper, that was cool.

  12. #12
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    I'm a minimalist in my main cycling Camelbak, which I suppose can be bad. It really depends on what sort of riding I am doing (distance/time) and where. Usually I just have a tube, CO2, mini pump, cliff bar/energy chews, baggy or two of drink mix, and some 800mg Motrin floating around in there. Nothing really first aid related. I always carry my cell phone (luckily my local trails are pretty good with cell service here in southeastern Wyoming - surprisingly!), and have a Garmin 510 cycling GPS. For personal ID, I have a Road ID wristband. I'm an RN, so I like to believe I am pretty good at creative solutions to problems, so who knows what I could use for a splint or whatever!

    I do have a larger Camelbak that is more hiking oriented (but I have used on the bike) and in there I have an emergency blanket and a compact first aid kit that has a cold pack, all sorts of gauze, tweezers, etc. , and even more (expired) snack foods. Longer excursions I buy Slim Fast protein shakes and throw in there... a bottle or two doesn't weigh too much and can provide a bit of nutrition in a pinch in a different form that a typical gooey bar/candy/treat.

    I LOVE the tip about taking the sweaty bra off... brilliant! Vet wrap/coban is also another really good idea, as it is very versatile. I'll have to remember to pick up a roll next time I'm around a ranch store.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabrielle View Post

    I'm wondering if the vet wrap tape (Coban, made by 3m, much cheaper at a ranch supply store if you have those) would be good for splinting. It's great for wrapping ankles and holding gauze on a messy wound.

    Regarding the heavy leatherman - yeah...that's one of the gaps in my toolkit, I don't have good pliers and it's because they're heavy. I've been eyeballing the Skeletool: Skeletool - Leatherman Multi-Tools and this one from Gerber: Crucial Multi-Tool - Green. I really only want them for the pliers, though. :/
    They used vetwrap (probably over some stiff plastic thingy) when my dog broke both bones in her front leg.

    Those multis look pretty nice, I wonder if the jaws are big enough for stubborn BB7' adjusters. I like these little 6" pliers for that task Irwin Vise Grip 2X Faster Groove Lock Pliers, 6" (4935351) at Aubuchon Hardware

  14. #14
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    I have several Leatherman multi tools .. the Wave in my backpack and the Blast is always in my purse.

    It was a good thing that I always keep an emergency kit in my bike bag. I had to use it when a guy in our group went over the top of his bike slicing a finger wide open somehow. His friends wanted to take him to the emergency room, but I was able to bandage it up so that all of us could continue the ride.

  15. #15
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    What I have in my pack now (it's a pretty lightweight pack because of shoulder impingement, but since the reduction, I might be able to carry a slightly bigger pack..)..

    Tape and gauze (I'm allergic to adhesive, so we can put tape on the gauze)
    Spray neosporin (some of the best stuff EV-ar)
    Benadryl (allergic reactions, very important)
    A reflective blanket

    I need to carry more, but I'll go back at this later. I need to find my cloth sling. That's cloth and foldable and fits. Unfortunately, it's a right-sided one.

    I had to have my arm splinted in 2007. If you search on MTBR for "Stripes breaks paw", you'll read up on me breaking my right (dominant) wrist, which meant for months of fun. I still cannot chop food for long periods of time becasue I get hand pain.

    However, you can see that BigLarry used a bike pump as a splint and a tube as a sling. We need use medical tape to get the bike pump/splint on. The good news is our other two riders (Cindy and FSR Guy) were able to sprint to the cars.. but it was a loooong 45 minutes waiting for them to return.

    Picture here:
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jewels View Post
    thx everyone, just added lighter,tape,der hanger and leatherman. looking at bivvy, is there anything smaller/lighter that's about the same thing? I'm in Hawaii so it won't get too cold, but will get wet. The rescue even made the online newspaper, that was cool.
    Jewels, it even made the local news here. I saw it on the Big Island and wondered if it was you guys because of the location and the newscaster said the rescue was done by several bikers. Way cool!!

    Regarding emergency stuff - I carry one of those space blankets, I have a bunch of duct tape wrapped around my pump, I carry a small pocket sized first aid kit along with my CPR mask. I am first-responder certified. I carry CeloX Europe Home « Celox , I carry a mini leatherman, flashlight.............

    I think that's it regarding emergency stuff. And then there's the whole bike repair and parts stuff. I never want to walk out so I've put together "emergency" stuff to keep bikes running.

    Great job again on the rescue. I was excited when I learned it was you guys.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gabrielle View Post
    Thing I'm not carrying, but should: my name & who to contact in case of emergency. Nobody knew the guy who fell into the ravine, and he wasn't in any shape to give us his contact info. It was kind of a mess.
    If anyone, anyone at all, still needs a roadID, and want to give me a credit over there, use this link:Road ID® USA's #1 Source for Runners ID, Cycling ID & Medical ID Tags

    I've posted a few stories on the commuter forum of cyclists in serious or past serious condition who could not be ID'd at the hospital. One nurse was a cyclist and actually tracked down a cyclist's name through the bike (shop sticker/serial #).

    An old ID card or license makes a decent free alternative to roadID. Use a permanent marker to write a couple emergency phone numbers on the back.

  18. #18
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    After reading these responses, I realize I am super minimal here...probably could add some much needed supplies to my packs...I have about 3 different packs depending on time/distance/location
    short-ish 1-2hr loops from my house, sometimes just stuff a multitool, pump, tube, levers and co2 into my frame pack or small camelback
    longer 3-5hr loops (all still from my house), same bike repair stuff, but then extra food, rain jacket, ibuprofen, 3L of water...and thats about it...

    Some great ideas here for things to add, I'm realizing I've probably been pretty lucky so far riding on some pretty far out CO trails and have been safe...sometimes with nothing but 2 waterbottles and a cell phone.

  19. #19
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    Compass .. and I don't mean digital high tech as batteries & signal will fail. A small mirror that doesn't weigh much as a signal to flash if you are out on trails, in more desolate areas. Also a LifeStraw in case you run out of bottled water, stranded for more than a day so you can purify any natural source of water and safely drink it.


    @ Jewels .. since you get wet .. a large plastic trash bag to cover yourself up in when it rains while you are stranded. Also is great to stuff leaves into for insulation to keep warm at night.

    Lightweight head lamp for sure.

  20. #20
    Light freak
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    Be careful with the aspirin. I crashed pretty hard on Labor Day breaking 2 ribs, puncturing a lung, and a concussion. A buddy had an aspirin in his pack and I decided to take it to take the edge off the pain as I was determined to ride out the remaining 8 miles back to the car. Had to stop to take a breather as I was having difficulty breathing while climbing up some steep switchbacks and felt like a hot poker sticking me in the side. Ended up passing out and waking up to find a bunch of people standing over me. Had to have the Fire Dept help me to a waiting ambulance. They asked me if I had taken anything and when I responded that I had taken an aspirin they said that was not a good idea. They said if I had internal bleeding that the aspirin would thin out my blood and maybe cause me bleed faster. I think it may have also had something to do with me passing out, thinned blood with less oxygen getting in my blood due to a punctured lung coupled with heavy exertion was not a good combination.

    I carry most of the things mentioned above, also carry duct tape wrapped around my seatpost and a Magnesium fire starting rod.


    Edit - sorry, I did not realize this was thread was in the Womens Lounge until it posted. I was just searching for latest posts. Kind of feel like I just walked into the Womens restroom by mistake. Just passing thru
    *****

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by scar View Post
    Be careful with the aspirin. I crashed pretty hard on Labor Day breaking 2 ribs, puncturing a lung, and a concussion. A buddy had an aspirin in his pack and I decided to take it to take the edge off the pain as I was determined to ride out the remaining 8 miles back to the car. Had to stop to take a breather as I was having difficulty breathing while climbing up some steep switchbacks and felt like a hot poker sticking me in the side. Ended up passing out and waking up to find a bunch of people standing over me. Had to have the Fire Dept help me to a waiting ambulance. They asked me if I had taken anything and when I responded that I had taken an aspirin they said that was not a good idea. They said if I had internal bleeding that the aspirin would thin out my blood and maybe cause me bleed faster. I think it may have also had something to do with me passing out, thinned blood with less oxygen getting in my blood due to a punctured lung coupled with heavy exertion was not a good combination.

    I carry most of the things mentioned above, also carry duct tape wrapped around my seatpost and a Magnesium fire starting rod.


    Edit - sorry, I did not realize this was thread was in the Womens Lounge until it posted. I was just searching for latest posts. Kind of feel like I just walked into the Womens restroom by mistake. Just passing thru

    *****
    Actually .. this thread should be posted for EVERYONE to see/participate. Emergencies doesn't discriminate with genders. SO much valuable info posted for all to benefit from !!

  22. #22
    Light freak
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    Quote Originally Posted by kris7047th View Post
    Actually .. this thread should be posted for EVERYONE to see/participate. Emergencies doesn't discriminate with genders. SO much valuable info posted for all to benefit from !!
    (I am now standing outside, shouting thru a crack in the door of the Womens Lounge)
    I TOTALLY AGREE! HAPPY NEW YEAR



    ****

  23. #23
    Now, THAT'S gonna hurt!
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    Quote Originally Posted by scar View Post
    (I am now standing outside, shouting thru a crack in the door of the Womens Lounge)
    I TOTALLY AGREE! HAPPY NEW YEAR



    ****
    Same here....I always use the "new posts" feature. (both hands over eyes, headed for the door...excuse me...pardon me....excuse me...pardon me...)

  24. #24
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    Well guys .. you could start a thread on this topic for all to participate .. but where to put it for best visibility?

    Here ? Rider Down, injuries and recovery

  25. #25
    Slothful dirt hippie
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    I have The Camelbak Of The Apocalypse, which is only surpassed by my Truck Of The Apocalypse. I have a full survival kit (first aid, firestarter, extra clothes, water treatment tabs, etc) that stays in a sil nylon water resistant sack in the bottom of my pack, then there's all the bike tools and bits.

    Years ago a guy picked up my pack and blarted "ARE YOU GONNA SPEND THE NIGHT OUT THERE?!?" My response was that if I HAD to, with that lash-up I could... it would be a crappy night but I'd get through OK.

    I ride back country whenever I can, often solo because nobody else wants to do that ride/that day/as slow as I do. Everyone I know who does similar rides carries quite a bit of stuff.

    P.S. Best compact emergency food source I've located would be Hammer Perpetuem Solids.... they're awful to choke down IMO but definitely pack a big punch in a small package with a bit of fat and protein as well as carbs.
    "...Some local fiend had built it with his own three hands..."

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