Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4MooreFitness's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    92

    Body Types and MTB

    I'm 5'0 (with shoes) and pear shaped. Always have had a big booty, used to hate it and now its an asset . I also have a short torso and small shoulders. Anyway what is your body type and do you see/feel you have advantages or disadvantages?

    The biggest disadvantage for me is finding the perfect fit. My bike right now is entry level and 13". I plan to upgrade, but I see most frames start at 15".

    Advantage - Im not that far from the ground when I fall.

  2. #2
    avlash
    Reputation: avlash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    8
    you may be my doppelganger...I'm 5'0 and have plenty of back...I just got a trek top fuel wsd with 14.5" frame.....I'm loving it.
    AVLAsh

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4MooreFitness's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    92
    The 14.5 doesnt feel to big? I might look into that. I can seriously pass down my bike to my 6 year old in about a year LOL.

    I love mt biking because its something my husband and I can do together. Im fast enough on a bike to keep up, but running together is impossible...his strides kill me! I do feel being lighter and smaller is an advantage. I just need to work on skills and confidence and that will make up for any disadvantages being vertically challenged

  4. #4
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,300
    I'm not sure what shape I am (e.g pear, apple), but I am top heavy. That is the worst part for me, because it affects my back and I can't have the handlebars low (the handlebars at saddle height is low for me).

    Beyond that, the fitting the clothes is the hardest part. Otherwise, just ride and have fun
    MTB4Her.com: mountain bike site for women, by women

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    111
    I am very much a newbie to mountain biking but just purchased a 13 inch Jamis Dakar FS Comp. For certain fit reasons my bikes are always just a little smaller than someone with my dimensions would normally buy, but I've a great fitter who keeps me from making expensive mistakes

    The point of this email is that the "13 inch" Jamis Dakar FS has the same measurements (well, VERY close to the same) as the "14 inch" Jamis Dakota. My LBS doesn't stock the Dakar, so when we realized this I test rode the HT Dakota for fit. Don't discount a bike you might be otherwise interested in because you think it might be a littel too large or small without test-riding it. There is so much variation between manufacturers in sizes - and what determines the difference between sizes.

  6. #6
    avlash
    Reputation: avlash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    8
    I agree you need to test ride the bikes, even if the stats in the book don't make the bike look like a good candidate. Bike makers all measure top tube/ frame size differently (yeah, love that) so you have to figure out what size works for you on the each brand. I went with the top fuel because I was looking for an awesome fit with good components. I have a 26" inseam and I can throw this bike around.....ok....I am still in my new bike honeymoon but I have put 400+ miles on her, including some 6+ hr rides....ride what makes you feel good.
    AVLAsh

    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live.

  7. #7
    Dirty South Underdog
    Reputation: Andrea138's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,617
    I'm 5'6" and "built like a brick sh*thouse"

    While I've never minded being able to put on muscle like a bodybuilder, I always figured that the weight would hold me back a bit with climbing. I've taken to singlespeeding, though, and I feel like it's actually an advantage to be big & powerful. Luckily, at my height, I don't have any issues with finding a bike that fits.
    Brickhouse Blog (most known unknown)

    Just Riding Along- best internet radio show on Mountain Bike Radio

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4MooreFitness's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    92
    Andrea that is pretty awesome. My legs are naturally muscular, but my upper body is weak. I workout my core a lot and this year just started lifting weights for upper body strength to balance me out. I wish my arms would put on some muscle.

    I guess tossing around a 30lb or so bike will help that out too.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15
    i'm 4'10" and maybe an inch more with shoes. my biggest concern is standover because my inseam is very short - regardless of the bike size. i have a GF that is 13" and a Specialized 29 that is 15" but the standover heights work for me because the bar is low.

    you can see my pics on the short wm riding 29r thread - i'm blessed w/ a sturdy backside as well as the rest of me.

    both of my bikes are HT - I have not had any success in fitting on a FS - they just don't work for me. but, i have found backside comfort with a thudbuster suspension seatpost. i am accustom to and really like HT's - but it may be just because its the difference between a bike that fits and one that doesn't.

    may look at trying to get a FS custom built sometime in the distant future.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 4MooreFitness's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    92
    Wow Ive never seen a seat post with suspension. Thanks for sharing.

  11. #11
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,300
    Quote Originally Posted by 4MooreFitness
    Wow Ive never seen a seat post with suspension. Thanks for sharing.
    I used the White Brothers one about 7-8 years ago, but it doesn't look like they make it anymore. Never tried the Cane Creek Thudbuster, but it looks like they're still made.

    Doesn't make your bike behave like a full suspension, but takes some of the sting out of riding a hardtail.
    MTB4Her.com: mountain bike site for women, by women

  12. #12
    LW Coaching
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    735
    My body type? Well my BF (affectionately) calls me T-Rex sometimes...pathetic upper body strength and a huge power center. Deffo good for biking :-)

  13. #13
    Bored Carp
    Reputation: chuky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,519
    Quote Originally Posted by 4MooreFitness
    Wow Ive never seen a seat post with suspension. Thanks for sharing.

    One of the reasons that they have fallen out of favor is that they do affect the advantageous power transfer on a hardtail. Additionally, they only take the edge off of you are sitting, and you shouldn't be sitting on descents or technical trail sections, anyway.
    I only attempt to change the world in the appropriate World-Changing venues and forums.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    2
    i am brand new to biking and here is my issue: i have large breasts (DD) and although i love the speed of my boyfriend's mountain bike, leaning so far over the bike causes pain between my shoulder blades. i decided to go with a comfort bike and while i am surely comfortable and have no pain now, i have lost my speed and sometimes it feels like i am pushing a horse!! how do i get comfortable and maintain speed? thanks for any input....

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    85
    To the OP:

    Size is relative. My old Klein HT was a 15" & I thought that I would need the same or smaller when going FS. I ended up on a Trek 16.5" Fuel EX7 WSD, & it fits better than any bike I've ever been on. Try to break that size paradigm & get on a few different ones to try out.

  16. #16
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,300
    Quote Originally Posted by clementineclark View Post
    i am brand new to biking and here is my issue: i have large breasts (DD) and although i love the speed of my boyfriend's mountain bike, leaning so far over the bike causes pain between my shoulder blades. i decided to go with a comfort bike and while i am surely comfortable and have no pain now, i have lost my speed and sometimes it feels like i am pushing a horse!! how do i get comfortable and maintain speed? thanks for any input....
    You're not alone. I suffer from a lot of "overhang," even after losing 40 lbs. I've been mountain biking for 19 years and suffering from this curse. Even after losing 40 lbs, I'm still a 36JJ, and I'm going in for a reduction in January. My sleep is affected as well as numbness is starting to develop in my ring and pinky fingers from the pressure on the ulnar nerve.

    If you want to get rid of the pain in the shoulder blade area (most likely your or minimise it as much as possible, these two things help me:

    1) Setup your MTB in a more upright position: do this by getting fitted by someone who fits MTBs not road bikes. My handlebars are probably 2" above my saddle and the saddle nose tilted ever slightly forward. I also find that riding with 29" wide bars and a short stem (50mm) keeps my chest more open and takes a bit of the pressure of the pectoral (chest muscle). People will say what they want about the proper bike setup, but whatever. It's about what's comfortable for YOU and what keeps you on the trail

    2) Do scalpular retractions. Those are exercises where you squeeze your shoulder blades together. A great exercise for them is something called inverse rows. It takes some time to get the strength but it helps a lot.

    There are a lot of other things I can suggest, but I'll save them for a PM.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cyclokitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    25
    I am 5'1 and built like a pear and an extra large Athena. Just bought a 14" Jamis Durango 1.0 Femme and it fits me to a T. When I was in the lbs I tried a 12" (too small) and a 16" (way too big) because I also prefer not to jump off the bike when I get off of it. I do that now with my commuter bike.

    Off the shelf, the bike's handlebar width feels really comfortable and I have the seat lower than the handlebars. The saddle is borderline comfortable and I think I'd prefer a seatpost with a bit of a setback but I think that's because my commuter bike is such a beast I'm used to being stretched out.

    As far as strength goes, I have strong legs, so-so core (working on it) and my upper body strength has improved but children could easily beat me in arm wrestling competitions.

    I've started doing core and upper body exercises but it's not the most fun I've had. It's fairly dull even with loud music or a video playing to distract me.
    2011 Jamis Durango 1.0 Femme
    2005 KHS T&C commuter bike

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    94
    I'm more of a hefty hourglass or brick Sh!thouse too.. I'm roughly 5'8 and I can ride either a medium or a large frame size which allows me to get some pretty good usedbike/frame deals .

    I don't care what anyone says but being heftier certainly is a performance disadvantage.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    616
    I'm 5'8" and I guess most would call me skinny, but I have pretty wide hips. I've lost about 12 pounds since May (160 down to 148) which I'm super happy about, and hope to be 140 in due time, which I think will be optimal for me. Both of my bikes are WSD... My Giant MTB is a Medium frame and my Specialized road bike is an XL frame. My legs are super long, torso short, with long arms. Can make fitting pretty wonky and saddles pretty high in the air. I did the BG FIT fittings for both of my bikes, which helped with some knee pain and pinpoint fitment issues I have on my bikes. I actually like being in a lower, more aggressive stance on the MTB (so more like a road bike with the leaning over). My saddle is high and stem is flipped.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    2
    aaah, thank you! great information! i did not know there were exercises to do for between the shoulder blades...good luck on your upcoming reduction, i hope to have one myself one day...my dream is to wear a tank top with no bra!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Plauscha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    85
    I am 5'3" pear with long legs (31" inseem) and t-rex like arms. I ride a small Yeti ASR-7. I have a DH stem. I find it interesting that there are so many short pears that ride.
    Yeti ASR-7- (DHX RC4)
    Trek Lexa SLX- roadie

  22. #22
    see me rollin, they hatin
    Reputation: NicoleB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,423
    5'3, all legs, no torso

    short top tube and high front end of bike is a must for me. i'll be XS forever because i'm not getting any taller from here!
    fap

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    155
    Quote Originally Posted by clementineclark View Post
    i am brand new to biking and here is my issue: i have large breasts (DD) and although i love the speed of my boyfriend's mountain bike, leaning so far over the bike causes pain between my shoulder blades. i decided to go with a comfort bike and while i am surely comfortable and have no pain now, i have lost my speed and sometimes it feels like i am pushing a horse!! how do i get comfortable and maintain speed? thanks for any input....
    I am about the same size. I found that the correct size bike made a huge difference. That, and strength in the muscles found between the shoulder blades. I also swapped my handlebars for something with a higher rise and a stem with slight angle. All this means I am slightly more upright than what the manufacturer intended. I notice it a bit when I am doing climbs, I have to focus a lot on getting my chest over my handlebars while keeping my shoulders retracted not rounding. elbows bent in and close to the body.

  24. #24
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,300
    Quote Originally Posted by cleopatra999 View Post
    I am about the same size. I found that the correct size bike made a huge difference. That, and strength in the muscles found between the shoulder blades. I also swapped my handlebars for something with a higher rise and a stem with slight angle. All this means I am slightly more upright than what the manufacturer intended. I notice it a bit when I am doing climbs, I have to focus a lot on getting my chest over my handlebars while keeping my shoulders retracted not rounding. elbows bent in and close to the body.
    Elbows should be bent yes, close to the body no.

    I was able to climb better and be able to breathe better when I learn how to stick my elbows out in more of an attack position. And when you have a lot of overhang (even if you don't), it helps to open the chest.

    For me, it helps relax my upper body too so I can be more loose and in control.

  25. #25
    Team Chilidog!
    Reputation: Stripes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    7,300
    Quote Originally Posted by clementineclark View Post
    aaah, thank you! great information! i did not know there were exercises to do for between the shoulder blades...good luck on your upcoming reduction, i hope to have one myself one day...my dream is to wear a tank top with no bra!
    A tank top with no bra? I would be happy to be comfortable wearing a tank top at all.

    There's a lot of different exercises you can do. PM me or email me and I'll be more than happy to talk to you about it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •