Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hallin222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    649

    New question here. 18" Kona Lisa DS too small for my 5' 10-3/4" wife?

    ***EDIT*** I've read the FAQ's, but the links about bike fit for small women don't apply here. Any help you folks can provid is greatly appreciated. ***END EDIT***

    My wife is currently riding a 19" 2005 IronHorse Warrior Pro. This thing is a 5", dual suspension, all mountain, 35+ lb rig that she likes quite a bit. Probelm is, its WAY overkill for the type of riding she (and I) do. We ride moslty moderately technical XC stuff and a sub 30 pound 4" FS bike would be more appropriate. She's also talking about participating in the spring TMBRA race series (Womens' 30-39 Bieginner XC class) and could definatley benefit form a lighter, more nimble bike.

    I know she likes this:

    http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...4&parentid=253

    This is bascially the female version of the Kikapu Deluxe:

    http://www.konaworld.com/shopping_ca...5&parentid=253

    Because of me (and soon her) being on the LBS's race team, we can get Kona's pretty cheap. I've checked out the dimesions and although the frame is an inch smaller than her current bike, the Kona is more XC oriented, and therefore has a longer top tube. It's only .15" or something different than her current bike. This could be fixed with a stem swap.

    Also, at her size, she doesn't need the lighter sprung forks of the women's 'Lisa DS' model comes with (we'd be looking at a fork swap soon anyway). Is it smarter for her to just look into the 19" version of the Kikapu Deluxe instead. Note, test rides on specific models/sizes aren't always possible, as the LBS is very small and doesn't keep a huge selection in stock.

    What do you ladies think? If my wife is going to commit to at least one season of racing, I think she deserves a new bike to do it on. We can continue to modify/upgrade parts as the need/want arises like I do on my bike. It's kind of a reward for getting ourselves back into shape and staying that way.

    Ian
    Last edited by hallin222; 10-09-2006 at 02:55 PM.

  2. #2
    involuntary dismounter
    Reputation: dHarriet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,491
    if she's riding a 19 frame then she must be pretty tall.

    as such, i would stick to the unisex bikes. typically, they have better components and they come in cooler colors (at least i like the colors more).

    also, keep in mind that if you're getting it through an LBS, you can swap out parts pretty cheap or at no cost if there is something that you don't like...for example, stems (if the lenght is not quite right for her), saddles, pedals, etc.

    good luck shopping!

    and yes, i agree...she does need to start the season with a better bike!
    Solo Trail Explorer and Granny Gear Ninja!


    friends will help you move, good friends will help you move a body...

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hallin222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    649
    On the 2006 models, the female Kona's use the EXACT same frame as the unisex models. It was mostly marketing, with a shorter stem, womens saddle, and pretty colors. An 18" Lisa DS might be an option, but the 19" might fit a little better.

    In 2007, the female bikes get their own frame, with a shorter TT, which she doesn't need anyway.

    Anyone else have an opinion on this? We're getting close to pulling the trigger on a new bike purchase and want to make the right decision.

    Thanks,

    Ian & Amy Hall
    Austin, TX

  4. #4
    spinner
    Reputation: spinnergirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    63
    I have to agree that a build out is probably a better bet... WS geometry aside (does she really need it??) components tend to be just-not-as-good on WS bikes unless you build it yourself... but the prices are just as high if not higher! IMHO better off sticking with something you can engineer yourself a bit. Good luck racing!

  5. #5
    Sometimes, there's a man.
    Reputation: kid4lyf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    85
    Personally, I'd opt for the smaller frame size for XC, especially if she has racing aspirations.
    I'm 6' and always raced 17"-18" frames.
    At 5'10" - 5'11", I would even consider a 16" frame, especially for technical XC riding.
    There's no such thing as too much standover and a smaller frame will handle "faster".
    Every other fit dimension can be achieved with seatpost and stem (using a longer stem will also bring her weight slightly forward; a plus for XC racing.
    Last edited by kid4lyf; 11-01-2006 at 06:57 AM.
    Providing levels of Internet suckage previously deemed unobtainable.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hallin222's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    649
    Thanks for the replies folks, but you're too late. She picked up a 2006 Kona Kikapu Deluxe (19") a few weeks ago and it fits great. There's no way in hell she was going to fit on a 17" or smaller frame. I can't believe that was even suggested. An 18" may have worked OK, but after seeing her ride this one, and hearing her rave, I'm glad she got what she did.

  7. #7
    Sometimes, there's a man.
    Reputation: kid4lyf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by hallin222
    Thanks for the replies folks, but you're too late. She picked up a 2006 Kona Kikapu Deluxe (19") a few weeks ago and it fits great. There's no way in hell she was going to fit on a 17" or smaller frame. I can't believe that was even suggested. An 18" may have worked OK, but after seeing her ride this one, and hearing her rave, I'm glad she got what she did.
    Glad it worked out.
    Apparently, I must be a reeeeeal small 6'
    Providing levels of Internet suckage previously deemed unobtainable.

  8. #8
    spinner
    Reputation: spinnergirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    63
    I think it has more to do with top tube length as relative to your torso length... anyway she's riding and that's a GOOD thing! Congratulations and may you have many happy miles together!!

  9. #9
    involuntary dismounter
    Reputation: dHarriet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,491
    Quote Originally Posted by kid4lyf
    Glad it worked out.
    Apparently, I must be a reeeeeal small 6'
    nah...i think some girls just fit on a bigger bike as compared to a guy who is the same height...the torso, arm and leg length ratios are different.

    i'm 5'9'' and ride a large (18') frame. i was cramped on a smaller bike (which is what i had before). but a friend of mine...guy...same height...smaller bike...

    that's just how it goes.

    best guideline...it's like buying a mattress...test them out, until you find one that gives you that happy feeling...and then get that one...because everyone is a little different and everyone likes a different fit (and mattress tension)
    Solo Trail Explorer and Granny Gear Ninja!


    friends will help you move, good friends will help you move a body...

  10. #10
    Sometimes, there's a man.
    Reputation: kid4lyf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by dHarriet
    nah...i think some girls just fit on a bigger bike as compared to a guy who is the same height...the torso, arm and leg length ratios are different.

    i'm 5'9'' and ride a large (18') frame. i was cramped on a smaller bike (which is what i had before). but a friend of mine...guy...same height...smaller bike...

    that's just how it goes.

    best guideline...it's like buying a mattress...test them out, until you find one that gives you that happy feeling...and then get that one...because everyone is a little different and everyone likes a different fit (and mattress tension)
    Understood.
    It's just that him and his wife are both new to the sport.
    The most common mistake most mtb noobs make (myself included 10 years ago) is buying a bike that's too big (perhaps I should say, bigger than is optimum for them).
    If you're 5'-9", how much standover does your 18" bike give you? I would guess maybe 2", if that. (I'm only using yours as an example for my point. I truly mean no offense)
    Look at a typical pro XC race bike; lots of seatpost, lots of stem length. That tells you they are using a smaller frame. Even road bikes are heading this way. Smaller frames tend to handle quicker and are easier to control when things get twitchy.
    A bigger bike may feel more normal and, while that is important, sometimes it's better to take a small step back and get used to something that may actually work better for you.
    Just something to consider.
    Providing levels of Internet suckage previously deemed unobtainable.

  11. #11
    spinner
    Reputation: spinnergirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    63

    Little/Big

    I agree... I think a lot of people tend to go too big... but the proof is in the riding I guess, and whatever level you are at you really should buy for your comfort level and style of riding.. a little expert advice never hurts IMHO why I got fitted as well as riding several models before buying.... I tried to get into something that would help me grow into the riding style I am hoping to develop as well as work for what I am doing now...
    ...at the end of my rope....

  12. #12
    involuntary dismounter
    Reputation: dHarriet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,491
    Quote Originally Posted by kid4lyf
    Understood.
    It's just that him and his wife are both new to the sport.
    The most common mistake most mtb noobs make (myself included 10 years ago) is buying a bike that's too big (perhaps I should say, bigger than is optimum for them).
    If you're 5'-9", how much standover does your 18" bike give you? I would guess maybe 2", if that. (I'm only using yours as an example for my point. I truly mean no offense)
    Look at a typical pro XC race bike; lots of seatpost, lots of stem length. That tells you they are using a smaller frame. Even road bikes are heading this way. Smaller frames tend to handle quicker and are easier to control when things get twitchy.
    A bigger bike may feel more normal and, while that is important, sometimes it's better to take a small step back and get used to something that may actually work better for you.
    Just something to consider.
    hey...no offense taken...and i totally hear ya on the fact that smaller bikes give you the advantage of standover height and manouverability...

    but my smaller frame was too small for me...tt length was really cramped...and on really long rides (more than 4 hours) my lower back would get too tight, and i could never get that seat post high enough for the flatter section! that bike was also too twitchy...especially on technical downhills...which is what i love! so for me...it was a compromise...i sacrificed some standover height for comfort and stability...

    IMHO...it's best to get a 'middle of the road', trail worthy but affordable bike, ride it for a couple of years, and then decide what you liked and didn't like, and then plunk down the cash on something better...

    Solo Trail Explorer and Granny Gear Ninja!


    friends will help you move, good friends will help you move a body...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •