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  1. #1
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    Lowe's has shock bushing hardware

    This is definately a DIY job and who knows if the sizes are even the correct diameters. If anybody is thinking about mounting their shock this might be an option. I had the bike shop do it for me the other day and it cost me $60 and the job looks DIY.

    Please post if you have used Lowe's hardware to mount a shock.

    Just thought I'd share.

  2. #2
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    Lowes stores are pretty big... In which section of the store did you see the bushing hardware?

  3. #3
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    Yeah, we need some details. Sounds interesting but for $60 you could get a full new bushings, reducers, and the professional CTS tool.
    Long Live Long Rides

  4. #4
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    Screws and Bolts aisle in Hardware section

    This is a new store in my area (for SLC residents, its at 1300 east and 300 west) so they might not stock this kind of hardware in every store. BTW they also had sealed bearings, but bigger than what would fit on my bike. They even had a "science experiment" drawer with all sorts of magnets and electrical switches and such. I was impressed.

    If I ever get around to buying a shuttle for my Bullit I'll need to replace the spacers. I might try this just to see if its a viable option.

    I should also say that these are copper (or brass) bushings and the spacers are stainless. I'm not quite sure what material shock manufactures typically use for their mounting hardware... anyone?

  5. #5
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    ton of holes in this write-up...did you say you found bushings and reducing hardware? reducing hardware would be a cool find...but to be honest, i'm not sure what exactly your talking about, sort of barfly ranting that you normally ignore...throw in some pics
    "He can make even a global summit meeting seem like a kegger." M. Dowd, NY Times, 19 July 2006

  6. #6
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    A summary of my bushing research...

    Quote Originally Posted by gringopapo
    I should also say that these are copper (or brass) bushings and the spacers are stainless. I'm not quite sure what material shock manufactures typically use for their mounting hardware... anyone?
    Bushings for Cane Creek and Fox shocks measure as follows: O.D.: 19/32", I.D.: 1/2", Length: 1/2". I believe they're made out of steel-backed PTFE-coated bronze.

    My local Ace Hardware carries bronze bushings (they call them bearings though) in their bolt room. They're the wrong size; the closest match has an O.D. of 5/8" instead of the required 19/32".

    McMaster-Carr has a bewildering assortment of plain bearings (bushings). They carry a steel-backed PTFE-coated bronze bearing of the correct I.D. and O.D. The length is wrong though, measuring 5/8" in length instead of 1/2". (This is part number 60695K64 and is priced at $2.91.) McMaster also has several plastic bearings of exactly the correct dimensions ranging in price from $6.28 to $72.29. Unfortunately, the only part which is rated for loads greater than the steel-backed PTFE-coated bronze bearings is the most expensive one.

    CTS carries DU bushings of the correct size. They also sell a bushing press. See: http://www.ctsmtb.com/bushingtool.cfm

    BETD also sells bushings, reducers, and a bushing press tool. The reducers look really nice. They're two piece jobbies made out of stainless steel. Unlike the typical two piece aluminum reducers which are identical and meet in the middle, the BETD strong bush has one long piece that extends all the way through the shock eyelet (and bushing) occupying the entire width. There is a smaller ring which fits over the end to prevent the shock from sliding back and forth. I don't have a clue what the hula hoop bushings are made out of; they're yellow in the picture. They're also rather expensive at 4 (English) pounds a piece.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the research Kevin

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