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  1. #1
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    New question here. First bike build

    Alright, so here's the deal. I'm gonna build a bike from the frame up. Thing is, I have no idea what to look for. I'm into XC. Was browsing pricepoint earlier and came across this: http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/141...tail-Frame.htm . I think it's what I'm looking for. I am trying to get stuff under $300, but for some I know I'll have to go over (i.e.-wheelset-maybe, fork). Also at pricepoint I was looking at http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/13786-315_ROCRA5-0-Search--/Rock-Shox-Reba-Race-Air-U-Turn-Suspension-Fork-'05.htm . That I know is what I'm looking for, but, being '05, I'm not sure if it will be there by the time I have the money for it. Would it be better if I bought a parts build kit or if I bought the parts seperatly? I'm hoping for full XT, 8 or 9 speed. Also, what should I look for in a headset? And a wheelset (disc)? What's the difference between this (http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/110...om-Bracket.htm) and this (http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/110...om-Bracket.htm)? Already know what kind of disc brakes I'm getting (BB7's). Lot's of questions, I know, but any help would be greatly appreciated. Any other frame recommendations would be great too.

    I think that's all. If there's anymore I'll post again.

    Thanks

    ~Shorty~

    I think what I'll do is buy parts as I get the money. I'm trying to make a generic list of what I plan to get and work from there.

  2. #2
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    hi kyle. try my site. Let me know what you want and we can work something out.

  3. #3
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    What do you mean when you say "we can work something out"

  4. #4
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    Prices, Parts and suggestions. It expensive to build a bike. Even with access to wholesalers it almost comes to the same price as a complete build. The frame is usually the worst of it but if you need anything let me know.

  5. #5
    aka baycat
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    Try one of the web retailers MANY people on this website use, super service, great prices and killer products.

    I bought my last build kit from Will @ fullcycles. www.fullcycles.com. Tell them what you want, budget and they can work something great out.

    Or check out Larry at Mt. High Cyclery.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    It is SO MUCH cheaper to buy a complete bike at "year end closeout" prices than it is to build one from scratch. All the little stuff will nickel and dime you to death. seat post clamps, cables, etc etc it all adds up

    the exception to the above is if you have 3 of everything lying around, and even then it will still be expensive, as I recently proved to myself

    this spring I bought a closeout 2004 GT I-Drive XC 2.0 for $999+tax from my local performancebike store after a pricematch + 10% off coupon. retail was $2k or something silly like that. best $1K I've spent on a bike: the wheelset alone is worth $300+ to me, as I put it onto my all mountain bike (DT swiss hubs + syncros wheels have been 100% bulletproof in nasty nasty conditions). I'm a real wheel wrecker. Say that 10x fast

    -Mitch mbaghdoi at hotmail.com

  7. #7
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    You guy's (mb300 and some other guy in the other forum i posted this in) dont get it. I don't care how expensive it would be, I want to build a bike. I want that sense of accomplishment and the experience that comes from it. I wanna be one of those guys that can answer the question "where'd you get that bike?" with "I built it from scratch."

  8. #8
    mtbr member
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    Dude, unless you have a tig welder, a lathe, a mill, and a pile of cro-moly tubing, you aren't building anything. You're assembling a bunch of parts that have dimensions that were standardized decades ago.

    I've "assembled" my own bikes before. Its expensive. You end up with a unique bike just like everyone elses.

    Assembling a bike takes about 1.5 hours and its not nearly as rewarding as saving $1000 or so. But to each his own...

    -Mitch mbaghdoi at hotmail.com

  9. #9
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    Quote Originally Posted by mb300
    Dude, unless you have a tig welder, a lathe, a mill, and a pile of cro-moly tubing, you aren't building anything. You're assembling a bunch of parts that have dimensions that were standardized decades ago.

    I've "assembled" my own bikes before. Its expensive. You end up with a unique bike just like everyone elses.

    Assembling a bike takes about 1.5 hours and its not nearly as rewarding as saving $1000 or so. But to each his own...

    -Mitch mbaghdoi at hotmail.com
    Would it make you feel better if I put "First Assembled Bike"?

  10. #10
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    kind of on topic... a couple of weeks ago i was following a guy with a couple of bikes on the back of his van and the paint jobs were amazing. The only thing was i couldnt tell what they were. As it turned out we were going riding at the same place so i walked up and looked at them. Custom paint jobs including the forks. Man they looked good and unqie. He had taken them to an autobody shop. I have an old fisher i am thinking of pimping out starting with this... then i can have a unique bike just like myself... what do you think of a gary fisher tequila hardtail with a triple 8 on the front, powdered coated blue with airbrushed flames coming from the bottom...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kylejohn4543
    You guy's (mb300 and some other guy in the other forum i posted this in) dont get it. I don't care how expensive it would be, I want to build a bike. I want that sense of accomplishment and the experience that comes from it. I wanna be one of those guys that can answer the question "where'd you get that bike?" with "I built it from scratch."
    kj, I hear where you're coming from. I recently gave full suspension a try, and was torn on whether to collect the parts and assemble it myself or have it put together for me. I was looking at boutique bikes, so the specs were going to be custom either way. I understand exactly why you'd want to build up a bike yourself. It does give you a sense of accomplishment, you learn exactly how your bike operates and how to diagnose and fix problems quickly, and you get exactly the component specs you want right off the bat.

    You say that price isn't an issue, but it's always an issue, if you know what I mean. Here are a few things to think about, based on my experience.

    1. I already have most of the tools I need to build a bike up, so that cost wasn't an issue for me, but it's something to think about as a first timer. A relatively complete tool set can easily cost more than the bike. This depends on whether you're doing your own pressing, facing, wheel building etc. Between a good stand, a decent torque wrench or two, and even the most basic quality tool set, you can easily spend $1,000, and this is just the bare minimum to get started.

    2. As others have pointed out, if buying a new frame and all new parts, you will spend A LOT more money by building it up yourself, especially if you're building up a mass-produced frame like you're looking at. Even building up an expensive boutique frame that you would have to customize anyway, you'll still come out (at best) just about even with having it built up by a good dealer. You say this isn't a big deal, but the sense of accomplishment is significantly diminished when you realize that it cost you $1,700 to build up what is essentially a $1,000 bike.

    3. To find the best deals, you will have to be patient and do a lot of research. This could mean waiting weeks or months just to save some dough here and there. This can be both rewarding and frustrating. The best deals also never last very long, so you'll have to have the cash available at any moment to jump on it.

    4. Shipping costs really add up. The best deals on different components will all be at different places. You lose much (if not all) of the price savings on the shipping costs for each individual item.

    5. If you haven't done a lot of wrenching on your own bikes yet (more than just tuning and adjusting), I'd suggest gaining that experience before doing your own build. If you haven't had to replace your bottom bracket, your derailleurs, cables, etc., you're not going to know what tools or parts you need to get the job done. You risk buying the wrong parts, breaking stuff, and/or ending up with a bike that doesn't run right and having to take it into a shop in the end anyway. Also, being able to wrench on your own bike and upgrade it over time gives you just as much of a sense of accomplishment as assembling it yourself in the first place.

    6. Keep a spreadsheet with part names/numbers, weights, cost, etc. This helps to make sure that you have the right parts, that they are compatible with each other, that you're getting the best deal possible, and keeps all your research organized.

    7. Whether you're buying a complete bike or slowly building it over time, you'll need to set yourself a budget and stick with it.

    FWIW, friends of mine who have saved money by building up their own bikes have done it by buying lightly used frames in good condition, transferring parts from other bikes or just lying around the garage, or buying componenents new or lightly used on ebay or the classifieds. It generally takes them 3 - 6 months to pull everything together.

    It sounds like you're new to this, and it sounds like you're building up your bike slowly over time since you have limited funds at the moment and can't afford to buy a complete bike immediately. At the level of bike you're looking at, I'd save some money and do some research to find the frame that best fits you and has a component group closest to what you're looking for. Buy the complete bike, then change out the parts you want to upgrade, doing the work yourself. As you go along, do your own wrenching. You'll slowly build up the tools and the experience that you'll need when you're ready to step up to the next level of bike.

    Maybe I'm way off here. If so, we'll need a lot more info to help you out: your size, riding style, the terrain you most frequently ride, whether or not you race, how much wrenching experience you have, etc.

  12. #12
    MONKEYMAN
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    don't listen to the haters. assembling your own bike teaches you a great deal about how your bike works- to me the education of DIY is worth the money. I roll my own computers too. it's fun and you get exactly what you want every time.
    Plus, I was unable to find anyone in my area or on ebay or otherwise who had a fully assembled slingshot farmboy for sale. I've always wanted one, I've been interested in getting a 29r and had the money- thus the stars were aligned. Also had Sycip do a powder coat on the rear triangle for that lovely 'nologo' look.
    Just waiting on the cranks and it'll be hitting the trail. Good luck!
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  13. #13
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    i'll reply in numbers.

    1. I have access to a complete set of tools and very experienced mechanics at my LBS
    3. I know. I can get some good deals at my LBS too.
    4. See three.
    5. I can service bikes. The only thing I haven't done is BB's and headsets, as to which see number one.
    6. I'm trying to.

    I'm new to the full construction, that's about it.

    Sizewise, I'm 5' 7" and 135 lbs. I ride XC, roots, rocks, some sand, switchbacks, etc. No racing.

  14. #14
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    Quote Originally Posted by finger51
    don't listen to the haters. assembling your own bike teaches you a great deal about how your bike works- to me the education of DIY is worth the money. I roll my own computers too. it's fun and you get exactly what you want every time.
    Plus, I was unable to find anyone in my area or on ebay or otherwise who had a fully assembled slingshot farmboy for sale. I've always wanted one, I've been interested in getting a 29r and had the money- thus the stars were aligned. Also had Sycip do a powder coat on the rear triangle for that lovely 'nologo' look.
    Just waiting on the cranks and it'll be hitting the trail. Good luck!
    Thanks for the encouragement. I'm sure that it will be at least a year before I have all the parts for it. Have fun with your ride.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kylejohn4543
    i'll reply in numbers.

    1. I have access to a complete set of tools and very experienced mechanics at my LBS
    3. I know. I can get some good deals at my LBS too.
    4. See three.
    5. I can service bikes. The only thing I haven't done is BB's and headsets, as to which see number one.
    6. I'm trying to.

    I'm new to the full construction, that's about it.

    Sizewise, I'm 5' 7" and 135 lbs. I ride XC, roots, rocks, some sand, switchbacks, etc. No racing.
    Sounds like you have access to some good opportunities that should help out a lot in building your bike. Having a full set of tools at your fingertips is huge. Nothing like getting a new component in the mail and realizing you don't have the right tools to install it.

    It also sounds like if you can't get your headtube and bottom bracket shell properly faced and/or threaded from the manufacturer, you could probably get it done at your LBS. You can also make your own headset press for < $20 at Home Depot, but sounds like your LBS can take care of that too. Otherwise, installing all the components on your bike is relatively straightforward with all of the instruction available online. You just have to be patient and realize that the things you haven't done yet will take a little longer your first time.

    Have you been fitted (or measured yourself and plugged the numbers into an online fit calculator)? Sounds like you've probably had access to a number of different bikes at your LBS, so you might have a good idea of the geometry you want already. Take the geometry numbers you get off of a fit calculator or from a bike you know fits you well and try to find a frame that works for you. Try out as many frames in person that you can. Good ways to save money are to get a closeout frame, a generic frame, a lightly used frame (you lose the warranty, but you can often get into a frame you wouldn't otherwise be able to afford). I spent about 4 months researching and even went out of state to test ride different frames. If you're going to put this much time, money, and effort into a bike, you want to be sure that you'll like it when you're done.

    For your components, now is a good time to look at '06 stuff since the '07 models are starting to roll out. For example, I just got a screaming deal on an '06 XTR crankset/BB. As you've seen there's also some '05 stuff still available. You can also save money by buying components in groups (e.g., rear derailleur/shifter combos). This also saves on shipping costs.

    As much as possible, try to stick with one brand for your drivetrain. Yeah, Shimano and SRAM are supposed to be compatible, but I've had some problems when I've mixed and matched. Do some research and make sure the different components you're looking at are compatible with each other and with your frame (make sure you get the right diameter seat post, that your stem clamp size matches up with your handlebar's clamp size, that your cranks, bottom bracket, and shell are all compatible with each other, etc.). Read the reviews and look for problems that others have had with the components you're considering and see if those problems will be an issue for you.

    When you think you've figured out the components you want on your bike, figure out how much it's realistically going to cost. You may find that it costs less to just order the bike as a whole from the manufacturer through your LBS. If you've got a special relationship with your LBS, you can probably get a great deal, especially if you're going to be the one putting it together in the end. You get the same experience building up the bike, but at a better price. Granted, you probably won't be able to find the exact component specs that you want on a manufacturer spec'd bike, but you can trade the unused components that you don't want towards the parts you do want. For example, if your bike comes with an LX front derailleur and you want XT, you might be able to trade the unused LX to your LBS for credit toward the XT model. If your LBS is unwilling to do that, you could always sell the LX model on ebay and use the money towards the XT. This allows you to get the best deal possible, the same experience building the bike up yourself, and you can customize it to the extent that you want/can afford.

  16. #16
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    Thanks again. I've been measured and plugged it in online. I am looking for a Full shimano drivetrain (XT if possible). Still trying to find a frame for me. I think I've narrowed it down to either the Nashbar Signature steel frame or the Sette Reken on pricepoint (or ebay). I really can't get too many parts until I find a frame.

    Thanks. You've probably given me the best advice so far.

  17. #17
    Don't touch me!
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    Quote Originally Posted by mb300
    Dude, unless you have a tig welder, a lathe, a mill, and a pile of cro-moly tubing, you aren't building anything. You're assembling a bunch of parts that have dimensions that were standardized decades ago.

    I've "assembled" my own bikes before. Its expensive. You end up with a unique bike just like everyone elses.

    Assembling a bike takes about 1.5 hours and its not nearly as rewarding as saving $1000 or so. But to each his own...

    -Mitch mbaghdoi at hotmail.com
    Ahem... According to the definition, the use of build can be considered proper in this thread's context.

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...1868&dict=CLD2

    The reason it costs more to build a bike is because you get the parts you want. No crap oem seatpost, stem, h-bar, saddle, etc; which normally weigh a ton. When I built my bike, I went all out. Thomson bits, nice lightweight wheelset, carbon h-bar, zooty disc brakes, ti and al bolts, + Sram XO shifters and rd.

    Check out oddsandendos.com for disc xc wheelsets; that's where I purchased my wheels. Also, you may want to look into building your own wheels, just a thought. You could slap those wheels together while waiting for parts (or cash) to arrive.

    If you decide on a build (oops, I mean assembly) kit, check to see if the store/shop is willing to substitute parts for ones that you'd prefer. It will cost less in the long run b/c you will be itching to replace it at first chance. I would recommend a headset that has cartrige bearings, as they are easier to deal with and a little cleaner for maintenance. Cane Creeks seems to be the best bang for the buck.

    PS Remember to get that FD clamp size correct! I remember having to swap one out b/c of my goof. Had to endure a few more days of agonizing anticipation!
    [SIZE=3]No offense to KB, but if I see another "Strong, light, cheap. Pick two" line on this site...

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  18. #18
    Out there
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    unless you are mining the ore yourself and smelting it, don't kid yourself, you aren't building anything.

    er, yeah, right

  19. #19
    We want... a shrubbery!
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    Hah, I'm glad I never came across this criticism before I 'assembled' my first bike. Also, I find it a little funny how I built up my own bike to save money... See, I'm a college kid. No rich parents and no inheritence, so unfortunately I have to work for everything that I buy. Long before college I had gotten pretty heavily into mountain biking, and my first 'true' mountain bike was a '99 FSR XC Pro that a guy raced with while he was waiting for his custom bike from Specialized to come in. I loved the bike to death, and that bike went everywhere, whether it be snow, rain, or shine--moon or sun. But despite going to a University that prides itself in this 'Honor Code' my beloved bike was stolen in a matter of minutes as I ran inside to turn in an essay that was due.

    Well, after about 4 months, I had had enough, and I needed to get back into biking. Unsure as to what I really wanted I started my long journey with mtbr, and after much thought and deliberation, I finally decided that while I definitely wanted to get back into mountain biking, I also wanted to finally give racing a shot. Well, since I didn't have a decent enough bike to race with (old Trek 820 from middle school years), why not get a nicer 'racing' bike since I need to get a bike. That's about when I saw how expensive those 'badass mothas' (sorry, just watched Cool Runnings haha) were. There was no way I could afford a nice race bike with my limited budget. And that is just about when my love affair with ebay started, that continues to this day.

    You can find parts a lot less than retail on ebay, and about 80-90% of the pieces that I bought were brand new--including the frame for the first bike I built up, an '03 S-Works Epic. Compared to MSRP of all the different components combined, I ended up only paying about 55-60% of that; I thought that was pretty good even after considering that you often don't pay full retail for anything, but 40-45% off for a brand new bike of with what I considered to be the best (or close to if it wasn't) parts (thanks to mtbr, I exhaustively searched the forum and review section before I picked ANY part and then I searched ebay and a select few other online retailers).

    Since then, I have built up two more bikes, including an '04 Epic built up completely from scratch, and I have rebuilt (or rather, rescued one of 'em) using pieces and components that I bought off of ebay. So, when someone says that you pay more building up a bike, I'd have to disagree. Ok, so I didn't have ALL the tools (I had the headset pressed in on the bikes) but I managed to completely assemble my bikes (minus headsets obviously...). And in case anyone is wondering about the durability of my 'assemblage' skills without proper tools, my ingenuity in tool selection has proven solid, as I have raced on the bikes and ridden relentlessly and not a single bike has failed on me ('cept for this one damn squeaking pedal!).

    I think the best part about bike building is that I spread the build time out over a 4-5 months from when I first started ordering/purchasing components to the bike being fully ride-able, and therefore, I had packages coming in every other day for a good month--talk about feeling like a little kid waking up to Christmas ('cept I was waking up at the end of class and then coming back to find packages) for a month straight as the pieces to your creation slowly come in. But yea, building a bike isn't more expensive; well, let me clarify that statement. Building up a bike for me was far less expensive than if I were to buy a comparably built bike MSRP, or even 'On Sale'. However, I think I spent more money than I originally intended once I realized I could get a much better component for only $50 dollars more...
    waaahoooooooooooooooooo

    Calvin : Ahhh, another bowl of Chocolate Frosted Sugar Bombs! The second bowl is always the best! The pleasure of my first bowl is diminished by the anticipation of future bowls and by the end of my third bowl, I usually feel sick.
    Hobbes : Maybe you shouldn't use chocolate milk.
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  20. #20
    I like to ride my bike.
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    I'm sorta in the same situation you are in. I'm going to try not to let money get in the way. Yes, I have none like you, but I agree that you should buy stuff as it comes up cheap.

    In other words, don't do this.....
    I want BB7s, but I'll save $40 with the BB5s. or I really want XT, but LX is so much cheaper.

    If you keep doing this, you'll have a K-Mart piece o' _______ by the time your finished. Save up, then buy what you really want. I want an Epic frame, but I keep saying to myself that that $300 KHS is so much cheaper...... Don't let this happen to you!
    I like bicycles. Bicycles make me happy. Riding them makes me even happier.
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  21. #21
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    I'm almost completley done with the build of my bike and it has cost a very pretty penny. I'm building up my first full suspension, but honestly do not feel like I have waisted any money at all. I believe its more about patients then anything. Shop around ! You will find plenty of great deals on new 05' parts and ebay also has some great deals. It's been about a month and the bike is still a week from being complete, but I already have a great feeling of accomplishment.

  22. #22
    MONKEYMAN
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    Quote Originally Posted by nbrablec9
    I believe its more about patients then anything.
    Hey! did you go to Hollywood Upstairs Medical College too?
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  23. #23
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    Agee with RideFaster

    I totally agree with RideFaster.. I am building a Salsa Dos Niner and the parts are piling up as well as the price tag for all of it. But this is my hobby, my fun and I am going to own it for a long time, so I bought exactly what I wanted within reason/budget. Did I go over reason/budget.. sure did !

    Can a manufacture build it cheaper ? Hell yes, but I am not into this project to build it cheaper, only to build what I envision. I did toil over purchasing the '05 model or lower end component head trip in the early going. But I finally caved in and reminded myself you only go around once.. do it right or the regrets will eat away after the finished product hits the trail.

  24. #24
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    I'm not trying to be an total a-hole here, but....

    how's that bike build coming kylejohn4543? how long did it take? did you lace up your wheels yourself (the only tough part about building a bike in my opinion)? how much did you spend (down to the penny)? how much have you gotten to ride it?

    check out:
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=3050

    mk3 expert $1899 - 20% = $1520 + tax or shipping. If they had a 21" in stock I'd be all over this one, that is one heck of a lot of bike for the $$

    I currently ride a bike that I built from ebay, I've got about $2100 into it, not including all the parts I already had on hand (seat, brakes, shifters, cables). If I would have bought it on closeout and swapped out the fork for the one I wanted and ebay'd off the OEM fork it would have cost me..... about $2200, and it would have better brakes on it and I would have been riding it 60 days sooner.

    I've learned from my experiences. If you want you can learn from them too...

  25. #25
    anyone else smell that?
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    i dunno. there is something to be said about assembling one up yourself. learning to make adjustments etc. and you can get the exact parts that you desire...no compromises.

    but a lot of folks would be better served by buying a pre-assembled bike and riding it until it falls apart.

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