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  1. #1
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    WTB Timberwolf Race (2.3 or 2.5)

    Can somebody give me some feedback on how this tire performs as a front and/or rear tire in different conditions? (wet/muck, dry/loose, hardpack/smooth, rocky, rooty, etc.)

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    kneecap
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Can somebody give me some feedback on how this tire performs as a front and/or rear tire in different conditions? (wet/muck, dry/loose, hardpack/smooth, rocky, rooty, etc.)

    Thanks.
    Sure,
    I have a 2.5 timberwolf race used as front on my enduro. I bought it to try out at Mommoth in the eastern sierras, . Compared it to the panaracer FR 2.4, my favorite for really loose conditions, the timberwolf is around 100+ grams heavier, & about the same size, seems WTB tires run a little small & around 100grams over posted wt. It did work quite well there though, softer tread compound hooks up better on hardpack, rocks & roots, than the FR.
    I'd love to try out the timberwolf 2.7, but as one of the internet sales states, "heavier than your bike frame" LOL. Still, might be a good Mammoth tire.......

  3. #3
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    The Twolf Race tires (all sizes) are one of the more popular tires F & R for general trail riding around here (western Oregon Cascades and some central Oregon). All conditions and terrain. The only "complaint" I have heard is they are not the easiest roller on pavement.

    The Race versions are reasonably light for their size. The DH versions weigh in at nearly double.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    The Twolf Race tires (all sizes) are one of the more popular tires F & R for general trail riding around here (western Oregon Cascades and some central Oregon). All conditions and terrain. The only "complaint" I have heard is they are not the easiest roller on pavement.

    The Race versions are reasonably light for their size. The DH versions weigh in at nearly double.
    Do you recommend 2.5 front and 2.3 rear in the Race versions or 2.3 stick-e FR version for front and 2.3 race version in rear for riding around here?

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Do you recommend 2.5 front and 2.3 rear in the Race versions or 2.3 stick-e FR version for front and 2.3 race version in rear for riding around here?
    Use what you feel comfortable with
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Use what you feel comfortable with
    So I just got a 2.5 Race T-wolf for front to go with a 2.3 rear and that 2.5 is huuuuuge. Definitely will be the biggest tire I have ever ridden on. I hope it doesn't slow me down on the twisty singletrack, but at only a +50g weight penalty compared to the 2.3, for so much more volume and girth I couldn't resist.

    Is the 2.5 Twolf Race going to be much slower on the tight sk than the 2.3 due to massive increase in size?

  7. #7
    ride hard take risks
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    On Nor Cal dirt didnt like it on the back, no brake control. Front 2.5 is awsome, like bubble gum on hot asphalt.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    On Nor Cal dirt didnt like it on the back, no brake control. Front 2.5 is awsome, like bubble gum on hot asphalt.
    Sweet, yeah I just got a 2.3 Race T-wolf for rear and 2.5 front for spring riding here in the NW. It was a little early for the Maxxis HR's around here, plan to use them more this summer where braking control in the loose is essential and I wanted a bigger front tire to replace my 2.35 Kinetic and the 2.5 T-wolf definitely did the trick. I am going to be taking them out today to test them. The UST ST Highroller on a somewhat dry/tacky decent was awesome on a trail I rode last week though, went the fastest ever have before on that trail with good control, but it was mediocre/poor on a mucky ride with poor traction the day before. I am going to try to get another wheelset, one for the big boy's tubed and keep the HR's for my UST rims so I can switch out readily dependent upon riding conditions, because the weather is always a changing around here.
    Thanks for the feedback.

    - Jon.

  9. #9
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    ...Is the 2.5 Twolf Race going to be much slower on the tight sk than the 2.3 due to massive increase in size?
    More grip and control will slow you down in the twisties?

    Do not be afraid to play with the pressures.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    More grip and control will slow you down in the twisties?

    Do not be afraid to play with the pressures.
    Yeah, I unfortunatlely experience just that today on a tight, technical, mixed, rocky, loose and hardpack descent with the 2.5 front at 33 psi and 2.3 rear at 38psi.

    The wolves were pretty darn slow on the climbs, I am shooting myself for not getting the softer FR 2.3 version for up front instead of the 2.5 Race. The 2.5 is a huge, high volumed tire that wants to float over the rough stuff, but doesn't want to stick on the ground and very clum-bunxious in the tight stuff. Also almost took a really bad fall on a brief slick rock section at the end. The front knobs didn't roll over that stuff too well and dumped me in the process, whereas the my usual front Stick-E Kinetic 2.35's had no problems. These tires aren't the greatest in the hardpack as well, but when the trail gets rough and sloppy and you want to maul through it without much grace then this tire is it. I will see how it does in the wet, sticky, mucky stuff on Thursday, may still want to keep them.

    What pressures do you recommend for 215lb. all-mt. rider in mixed conditions? (hardpack, rooty, rocky, loose, sloppy).

    Thanks, jon

  11. #11
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    What size tube are you running in the 2.5?
    I use a 2.35-3.00 tube between 27-28 psi & i'm about 180lbs.

  12. #12
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    I would drop the pressures a bit. Experiment.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogonfr
    What size tube are you running in the 2.5?
    I use a 2.35-3.00 tube between 27-28 psi & i'm about 180lbs.
    In the 2.5, I am running a 2.20-2.70 tube and a 2.20-2.50 tube in the 2.3. The tire isn't that bad, but did feel like I was riding on flexy stilts due to the tall squishy knobs, especially during the climbs.

    I think I like the HR in the rear better for loose and hardpack for sure, outstanding braking control even with 40psi ran tubeless. I know that is high, but I am a heavier rider and hate the feeling of of the tire squirming due to having too low of tire pressure when in the saddle on the fast corners. I think a 2.3 Twolf FR 40a up front and Maxxis 60a LUST in rear would be a great combo for all-around up and down. I am even considering just running the HR's ST UST 2.35 front and rear even though they are almost half the size of the Twolf.

  14. #14
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Try using a bit more pressure in the Twolf, too.

    Sometimes a tall knob likes a firmer casing. Every tire has a air pressure sweet spot and it can vary with rider weight.
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