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  1. #1
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    Would a thick inner tube at high speed mess with a wheels alignment

    I got a thick inner tube for my rear wheel a while back. It's the slime brand thick 26' by 2.00 tube and it's pretty damn thick.

    Amazon.com: Slime 26" SV Thorn Resistant Thick Smart tube 26 x 1.75-2.125 (Schrader Valve): Sports & Outdoors

    Everything was fine until I went down a steep hill. While going down the hill my rear tire felt like it was slinging the weight of a bowling ball, It felt like the wheel was gonna come off any second and vertically hit my neck, back area; well maybe not that intense but yea.

    This could have partly been caused by the talcum (baby) powder I put inside my tire before I inserted the thick tube, I put a thin layer but I covered every square inch of the tire. I was tryn' to prevent pinch flats by doing this.

    My question is, does this thick tube have the chance of dis-aligning my wheel and putting wear -n- tear on the ball bearings that are inside the rotating center of the wheel?

    Or would this simply induce a truing issue?

  2. #2
    no trees are safe
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    Does it have sealant inside?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by uh yeah View Post
    I got a thick inner tube for my rear wheel a while back. It's the slime brand thick 26' by 2.00 tube and it's pretty damn thick.

    Amazon.com: Slime 26" SV Thorn Resistant Thick Smart tube 26 x 1.75-2.125 (Schrader Valve): Sports & Outdoors

    Everything was fine until I went down a steep hill. While going down the hill my rear tire felt like it was slinging the weight of a bowling ball, It felt like the wheel was gonna come off any second and vertically hit my neck, back area; well maybe not that intense but yea.

    This could have partly been caused by the talcum (baby) powder I put inside my tire before I inserted the thick tube, I put a thin layer but I covered every square inch of the tire. I was tryn' to prevent pinch flats by doing this.

    My question is, does this thick tube have the chance of dis-aligning my wheel and putting wear -n- tear on the ball bearings that are inside the rotating center of the wheel?

    Or would this simply induce a truing issue?
    Not the alignment, but the balance.

    But more likely the sealant that the thickness of the tube. The sealant may not be distributed well. The thicker tube can help reduce the chance of pinch flatting but the sealant will not help.

    If you see the tire wobbling or hopping when you spin the wheel then you do not have the tire seated properly.
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  4. #4
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    My son was coming home with flats at least once a week. So, I opted to use the thicker "thorn-resistant" tubes on his bike since I never know where he is going to be riding. Based on what I have seen so far over the last 9+ months, I have not seen any issues with wheels running true or additional wear on the tires or bearings.

  5. #5
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    Shiggy I think your right. I think that's exactly why the tire is spinning that way.

    This brings up a couple questions...

    I noticed that there is some sort of a tear on a portion of the sidewall. I think the cause of this tear could be due to over-inflation of when I didn't have a pump with a meter. Or it could also be because the tire isn't seated correctly or a combination of these two possible causes.

    At this point I'm guessing that I'm gonna have to totally deflate the tire then move it around or would I have to take the whole wheel out and play with the seating?

    My last question is, if I re-seat the tire properly then come to find that the tear is still a contributing factor to the wobble... then would I essentially have to replace the whole tire? I mean it really isn't too much of a bother, but at the same time if I leave it in this state then would I risk ruining my rim/wheel because of the irregular spin and possibly having to replace it sooner than expected?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Would a thick inner tube at high speed mess with a wheels alignment-img_0337-large-.jpg  

    Would a thick inner tube at high speed mess with a wheels alignment-img_0342-large-.jpg  


  6. #6
    CSC
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    The sidewall wear makes me think your brakes are rubbing up against the tire...make sure they are not mounted too high and clamping down on the tire as well as the rim (should just be the rim).

    It's cold now, so maybe the slime settled in part of the tube, and is not evenly coating the inside of the tube wall...

    Check the pad placement, then deflate the tire, work the tube around to move the slime...maybe take the bike inside to warm things up. I would be surprised if you were over-inflating them...unless you pumped them up until they were rock hard (never a good idea, even with road bike tires).

  7. #7
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by uh yeah View Post
    Shiggy I think your right. I think that's exactly why the tire is spinning that way.

    This brings up a couple questions...

    I noticed that there is some sort of a tear on a portion of the sidewall. I think the cause of this tear could be due to over-inflation of when I didn't have a pump with a meter. Or it could also be because the tire isn't seated correctly or a combination of these two possible causes.

    At this point I'm guessing that I'm gonna have to totally deflate the tire then move it around or would I have to take the whole wheel out and play with the seating?

    My last question is, if I re-seat the tire properly then come to find that the tear is still a contributing factor to the wobble... then would I essentially have to replace the whole tire? I mean it really isn't too much of a bother, but at the same time if I leave it in this state then would I risk ruining my rim/wheel because of the irregular spin and possibly having to replace it sooner than expected?
    If that is indeed worn-through casing threads it could be from grit/sand/mud between the tire and rim (or brake pad rub). I have worn through the casing at the bead in the past and the tire does wobble terribly. Best to replace ASAP if that is the case as the tire is ready to fail catastrophically.
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  8. #8
    CSC
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    If that is indeed worn-through casing threads it could be from grit/sand/mud between the tire and rim (or brake pad rub). I have worn through the casing at the bead in the past and the tire does wobble terribly. Best to replace ASAP if that is the case as the tire is ready to fail catastrophically.
    It's not about to up and explode on the guy .

    It's only the top layer of rubber that has worn off (for any number of reasons), not anything structural, such as the casing itself. That being said, I would *begin* to look for new tires, as well as check on the above-mentioned possible causes for both the rear to the tire and the "speed wobbles". The sky is not falling, but best to have a replacement lined-up.

    And if you keep wearing through tires in that area, I'd get your rims looked at.

    -check for brake pad / tire rub
    -deflate tires, work the slime around
    -start the search for a replacement tire

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    It's not about to up and explode on the guy .

    It's only the top layer of rubber that has worn off (for any number of reasons), not anything structural, such as the casing itself. That being said, I would *begin* to look for new tires, as well as check on the above-mentioned possible causes for both the rear to the tire and the "speed wobbles". The sky is not falling, but best to have a replacement lined-up.

    And if you keep wearing through tires in that area, I'd get your rims looked at.

    -check for brake pad / tire rub
    -deflate tires, work the slime around
    -start the search for a replacement tire
    I can not tell if or how badly the casing is damaged in the pics. But if the wobble is because of casing damage, the tire could fail at any time. Been there...
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  10. #10
    CSC
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    And I have spent an afternoon as a 12 year old skidding worn out tires trying to wear through the casing...running on wire and nylon. I also have a WTB Prowler tire with threads that are hanging off of the sidewall, and had been like that for a year of use with no problems.

    Tires are pretty tough in *my* experience, which is where I am basing my suggestions from.
    Same as you. I did agree with replacing the tire, but added that it's probably ok to ride on for now.

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