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  1. #1
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    Why no CO2 for Stan's Sealant?

    Before I got an air compressor I used CO2 to inflate and seal my tubeless tires. On the Stan's website they specifically warn against doing this. I've used that method a half a dozen times in the past and haven't had any problems. So what's the deal?

  2. #2
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    How often did you have to replace your sealant?

  3. #3
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    Not more than twice a season. Does the CO2 somehow react with the sealant?

  4. #4
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    I believe the use of C02 is discouraged due to the lack of moisture in the compressed gas. The low humidity environment should cause the sealant to dry up faster.

    Obviously in a race setting, C02 must be used. But for all other inflating I prefer a floor pump or standard air compressor.

  5. #5
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    i believe it can cause it to set up and basically become a latex ball.

  6. #6
    Its got what plants crave
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    It also comes out really cold.

  7. #7
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    YAH, the co2 expands very rapidly and causes the sealant to freeze, i believe...

  8. #8
    Single Speed Junkie
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    One observation from this past weekend after picking up a new pair of tread.

    We were having difficulty getting the tire seated on the rim even with a compressor at 120psi. After trying every method of getting the bead seated and watching an hour pass figured might as well try a CO2. Tire seated right up with out any issues. Of course we had to break the bead in one section to get the stans in. Finished the job with the compressor and was ready to roll.

    Think the main reason they warn against using CO2 is that it has more energetic potential. Not sure if it reacts with the CO2 chemically.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by crux
    Think the main reason they warn against using CO2 is that it has more energetic potential. Not sure if it reacts with the CO2 chemically.
    It does react. Here are some quotes from the NoTubes forum from Pete & Mike at NoTubes.


    Using CO2 is not recommended as it may set up the sealant. During a race though do what you have too to win. Just make sure the valve is at the top. And give the sealant a second to flow down to the bottom of the tire so not to be blasting right on the sealant. - Pete

    It can shorten the life of the sealant in that it can turn the once liquid sealant into one rubber ball. If you must use CO2, you can inflate the tire without sealant, then deflate the tire and add your sealant through the valve stem. With most tire and rim combinations, the beads of the tire will stay on the benches of the rim making re-inflation much easier. -Mike


    Here is a link to the thread on the NoTubes forum.
    http://messageboard.notubes.com/viewtopic.php?t=66

  10. #10
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    My first experience was with CO2. I didn't have a compressor and it worked like a dream. Of course, a day later, I couldn't hear the sealant swishing around and realized it was frozen. I had to clean it out and install evevything again with a floor pump. Voila!

  11. #11
    Phil from San Diego
    Reputation: Prexus2005's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bholwell
    I believe the use of C02 is discouraged due to the lack of moisture in the compressed gas. The low humidity environment should cause the sealant to dry up faster.
    Bholwell is right on. The sealant does not chemically react with the CO2. It is a dry gas and turns the sealant into a rubber ball because the moisture is drastically reduced. It shouldn't freeze either unless the CO2 is blown right into the sealant.

  12. #12
    Five is right out
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    I've used CO2 and Stans with no problems. Others have reported the same, so YMMV.
    Since when did the phrase "invest in" come to mean the same as "buy"?

  13. #13
    Mulleticious
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    I've been using CO2 on Stans. It's great for emergencies when you're out riding and have a burp or a particularly large thorn in the tyre.

    Yesterday I replaced the tyre due to old age - and wondered what the sealant would look like. I was expecting to see rubber balls rolling around in there after reading some posts about it. All I saw was normal looking sealant still swishing around. No balls. Nothing abnormal. And I had not re-charged with stans for at least 4 months.

    Conclusion - CO2 works perfectly. (I always try to make sure the valve is at the top though when I use it).

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