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  1. #1
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    What causes spoke failure when JRA?

    I'd never broken anything but in the last 2 rides I've broken my rear derailleur, cassette (sheared a cog off), chain, and now a wheel spoke.

    ALL while quite honestly JRA. Totally smooth and flat terrain while soft pedaling each time.

    Do you guys carry spare spokes in your bags? I'm thinking maybe I should start.

  2. #2
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    Previous damage manifesting itself. Spokes in a bag isn't going to work, but stuffed in the seatpost may work.
    My bike MCA kinda climbs like a billy-goat. WOO WOO!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by shupack View Post
    Previous damage manifesting itself. Spokes in a bag isn't going to work, but stuffed in the seatpost may work.
    Makes sense, just seems like it would break when you went off a drop or something, not under minimal load.

    Are you saying a bag wouldn't work because they'd get bent around in my camelbak? What if I taped them to a ruler first?

  4. #4
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    Most likely the spoke was either previously damaged or the wheel was poorly built, I've never known anyone who carried extra spokes during a mountain bike ride unless it was an extended tour or something similar.

  5. #5
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    Galvanic corrosion. GOOGLE it..
    Todd

  6. #6
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    Purely from an engineering perspective, just the vibration of JRA can cause a small crack caused by something catastrophic to get bigger and break.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Most likely the spoke was either previously damaged or the wheel was poorly built, I've never known anyone who carried extra spokes during a mountain bike ride unless it was an extended tour or something similar.
    Gotcha. To what extent should I baby the bike back when a spoke is broken? There's still 31/32 spokes remaining but with the tension on the 31 remaining, the wheel will be out of true so I imagine that puts extra strain on the remaining spokes and it's worse than having just 31/32nds as strong of a wheel.

    I was only 4 miles from my car when it happened today and could take pavement all the way back, but what if I was further out and didn't have the pavement option?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyin_W View Post
    My $ is on a factory wheel. When machine built they rarely get spoke prep, or any lube.
    This causes the nipple to bind to the rim, or to seize onto the spoke, and either can cause failure while JRA.
    It's easy to carry spares, a cassette tool, chain brake & big-azzed crescent not so much.
    I carry a chain breaker... I've never replaced a spoke but based on your post I'm assuming you need a cassette lockring tool to replace the spoke?

    And yes, Roval Traverse 29 wheelset. Factory on my Stumpjumper Evo.

  9. #9
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    My $ is on a factory wheel. When machine built they rarely get spoke prep, or any lube.
    This causes the nipple to bind to the rim, or to seize onto the spoke, and either can cause failure while JRA.
    It's easy to carry spares, a cassette tool, chain brake & big-azzed crescent not so much.
    The best is the one you want to ride most often..

  10. #10
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    ^ Weird time lapse going on. To remove a cassette to get to te drive side spokes you'll also need a chain whip. (big/heavy)
    The best is the one you want to ride most often..

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyin_W View Post
    ^ Weird time lapse going on. To remove a cassette to get to te drive side spokes you'll also need a chain whip. (big/heavy)
    Yeah I saw that in another thread too.

    Alright, not doing that then. How bad is it to ride on a wheel with a broken spoke (just to get back to your car)? I'm not going to be going off any drops or plowing through rock gardens but not having to walk it would be nice.

  12. #12
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    Re: What causes spoke failure when JRA?

    I have heard of poorly implemented tubeless conversions, leaking Stans through the spoke threads, causing corrosion and then failure.

    This was relayed to me by a race mechanic, regarding a perplexing failure I saw with my own eyes

    sent remotely

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