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  1. #1
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    Using Stanís with a Good All-Mountain Tire w/o UST Rims

    Using Stanís with a Good All-Mountain Tire w/o UST Rims

    I have a 2007 Jamis Dakar XAM 1.0 with Mavic XM317 non-UST rims. I want to use Stanís or a similar product to convert my standard rims to a tubeless setup. My question is:

    1. What are your recommendations for a good, non-UST all mountain tire (2.35 or 2.3) that is relatively light and works well with Stanís and non-UST rims?

    2. Also has anyone tried Specialized 2Bliss or Bontrager Tuebeless Ready tires with Stanís and a non-UST rim? Are there any advantages to these products for this setup (vs. a standard tire like the Nevegal)?

  2. #2
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    "1. What are your recommendations for a good, non-UST all mountain tire (2.35 or 2.3) that is relatively light and works well with Stanís and non-UST rims?"

    There are plenty out there. I've used Continental Vertical Pros, Continental Mountain Kings, Maxxis Advantage 2.2's, and Kena Nevegal 2.1's with the Stans system with good results. The best that I've used so far is the Conti MK's. The rubber compound on the inside of the carcass doesn't seem to be as porus as the others so the tire body seems to seal better with the Stans sealant. But there are plenty of tires that work well with Stans. Just steer clear of the super light, flimsy sidewalled, weak beaded race tires and most will work fine.

    2. Also has anyone tried Specialized 2Bliss or Bontrager Tuebeless Ready tires with Stanís and a non-UST rim? Are there any advantages to these products for this setup (vs. a standard tire like the Nevegal)?

    I haven't used them, but have seen them used. The advantage is the same as with the way the Conti MK's that I mentioned above seemed to seal up better. With a TLR tire the manufacturer "usually" uses a bit stouter bead to facilitate a good solid hook up with the rim bead hook, and they use a "tighter" rubber inside the tire body that is much less porus than a standard tire. Kind of like a linner inside that is more air tight. Regular tires like the Nevegal are usually quite porus. When istalled tubeless with stans you usually get all kinds of small white spots on the sidewall and tread body of the tires where the stans bleads through and seals these pores. That's what it is designed to do. We set up a set of Bontrager TLR tires tubeless on a set of Mavic 717 rims for a customer a couple of days ago in the shop. They were easier to seat on the bead (initial inflation) than most standard tires I've used, and no little white spots on the outside of the tire body. The only place there was any evidence of the sealant actually having to do it's job was around the rim where the rim and tire meet. There were telltale white spots there to indicate sealant seeping through. So the sealant is still required to seal the bead for sure. So the TLR treatment does make for a better sealing tire when run tubeless as compared to "regular" tires.

    Unfortunately "tubeless ready" tire choices are pretty slim right now. But I'm betting with the popularity of running tubeless we'll be seeing more tires of the like. And to tell the truth I think that many manufacturers are "tightening up" their rubber compounds, at least on the inside of the carcass, to make them more tubeless friendly without blowing their horn about it. It doesn't take that much to do, and adds practically zip for weight, as is evidenced by the weights of the Specialized and Bontrager offerings. A tad heavier than a "standard" tire, but much lighter than comparable UST offerings.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squash
    "1. What are your recommendations for a good, non-UST all mountain tire (2.35 or 2.3) that is relatively light and works well with Stanís and non-UST rims?"

    There are plenty out there. I've used Continental Vertical Pros, Continental Mountain Kings, Maxxis Advantage 2.2's, and Kena Nevegal 2.1's with the Stans system with good results. The best that I've used so far is the Conti MK's. The rubber compound on the inside of the carcass doesn't seem to be as porus as the others so the tire body seems to seal better with the Stans sealant. But there are plenty of tires that work well with Stans. Just steer clear of the super light, flimsy sidewalled, weak beaded race tires and most will work fine.

    2. Also has anyone tried Specialized 2Bliss or Bontrager Tuebeless Ready tires with Stanís and a non-UST rim? Are there any advantages to these products for this setup (vs. a standard tire like the Nevegal)?

    I haven't used them, but have seen them used. The advantage is the same as with the way the Conti MK's that I mentioned above seemed to seal up better. With a TLR tire the manufacturer "usually" uses a bit stouter bead to facilitate a good solid hook up with the rim bead hook, and they use a "tighter" rubber inside the tire body that is much less porus than a standard tire. Kind of like a linner inside that is more air tight. Regular tires like the Nevegal are usually quite porus. When istalled tubeless with stans you usually get all kinds of small white spots on the sidewall and tread body of the tires where the stans bleads through and seals these pores. That's what it is designed to do. We set up a set of Bontrager TLR tires tubeless on a set of Mavic 717 rims for a customer a couple of days ago in the shop. They were easier to seat on the bead (initial inflation) than most standard tires I've used, and no little white spots on the outside of the tire body. The only place there was any evidence of the sealant actually having to do it's job was around the rim where the rim and tire meet. There were telltale white spots there to indicate sealant seeping through. So the sealant is still required to seal the bead for sure. So the TLR treatment does make for a better sealing tire when run tubeless as compared to "regular" tires.

    Unfortunately "tubeless ready" tire choices are pretty slim right now. But I'm betting with the popularity of running tubeless we'll be seeing more tires of the like. And to tell the truth I think that many manufacturers are "tightening up" their rubber compounds, at least on the inside of the carcass, to make them more tubeless friendly without blowing their horn about it. It doesn't take that much to do, and adds practically zip for weight, as is evidenced by the weights of the Specialized and Bontrager offerings. A tad heavier than a "standard" tire, but much lighter than comparable UST offerings.

    Good Dirt
    Do you have any experience of using the mountain kings in the Flow rims in the non-UST form. Also how often do you need to keep inflating the tyres and adding extra latex?

  4. #4
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    Thanks!

    Thanks Squash for taking the time to reply. That really helps!

    Jeff

  5. #5
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    Nope....

    Quote Originally Posted by bigsalmondoc
    Do you have any experience of using the mountain kings in the Flow rims in the non-UST form. Also how often do you need to keep inflating the tyres and adding extra latex?
    I have no experience at all with Stans rims so I can't comment on them directly. My current set up is a set of Bontrager Mustang TLR disc rims with the strip and valve that Bontrager specifically designed for that rim, and Continental Mountain King 2.2" tires and of course Stan's sealant. I don't commute on my MTB, I have a bike specifically set up for commuting, so the MTB only sees dirt duty. It gets ridden twice a week for the most part, almost daily on vacations. I check air pressure before EVERY ride even if the bike is being ridden daily. I usually end up adding about 3 to 5 psi a week when not ridding the bike every day (weekends are dirt days). It works out about the same as with my tubed commuter tires as well, so they are comparable. I check sealant and replenish it about every 3 months. All you have to do is deflate the tire and open one side. Usually I find a little ball of latex along with some liquid in the tire. Pull the ball, dump the old liquid and put in a fresh scoop and re-inflate the tire and allow it to seal back up as per Stan's instructions. It doesn't take as long for a re-seal as it does initially. But you do need to shake the tire then lay it flat on the side that you opened same as in the original set up instructions. Just a note though, the climate where you live will affect how long the sealant will last. Hotter drier climates = shorter sealant life. Higher hummidity and/or cooler temps will extend the life a bit. So keep that in mind.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

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