Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    97

    New question here. The Unpatchable Ignitor UST

    First off, let me say that I love these Maxxis Ignitors. This thread is in no way meant to be slanderous.

    Ok, so I got a couple of punctures on my Maxxis Ignitor 2.35 UST (LUST). No problem, I thought. I'll superglue to get me home and just patch it like I have done with my Michelins when I get home.

    The casing on the Michelins had a thicker layer of rubber on the inside with the threads closer to the outside of the casing. I'd rough up the inside of the tire, clean it real good with some acetone, and patch it. No problems doing it this way.

    I ran into a couple of problems when trying to patch my Ignitor. First off, the casing is kind of the reverse of the Michelin (probably why the sidewalls are tougher on the Maxxis); thick rubber on the outside with the threads of the casing practically exposed on the inner surface. So I started to rough up the area around the puncture, which immediately started to expose the casing's threads (and likely damaging them-and weakening the casing). I cleaned the area with acetone and tried patching. No luck. The patch basically falls off; it doesn't even try to stick. So I tried cleaning the tire around the puncture with dishwashing detergent and patching-no luck. Tried cleaning with alcohol and patching-no luck.

    What have you guys done to successfully patch your Maxxis tires?

    The options I am looking at:
    -Just run some Stan's.
    -Anybody tried the Hutchinson Rep'Air kit that supposedly uses some kind of superglue that is supposed to remain flexible? They say there's no need to rough up the surface like regular vulcanizing kits.
    -What about the tire plug kits?

    Any help is appreciated.

  2. #2
    not so super...
    Reputation: SSINGA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,459
    shoe-goo with a small patch made from an old tube works well. I ran a stick clean through my tire over the weekend and patched it this way and rode it all day Sunday.

  3. #3
    househusband
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Perpetrator
    What about the tire plug kits?.
    Far more effective than patches, in my experience; better to actually plug the hole than attempt to seal from the inside. I use the 'sticky string' type kits; the hole is cleaned with a small rasp and rubber solution inserted with the same tool, then a short length of rubberised cord is doubled up and inserted into the hole. Best of all is that you don't even need to take the tyre off the rim as it can all be done externally, on the trail.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    24
    Here's some tips for patching that tire.

    You've already found the hole and cleaned the inside of any thorns or other foreign objects. You've cleaned it up with some dishwasher liquid.

    Then heat the spot with the hole with a hair dryer. This will help remove all the moisture from the area.

    Clean the patch area off with a chemical cleaner like some liquid tire buffer from an auto store. This stuff is toxic so use gloves and care. It'll chemically clean the area really well and won't hurt the fabric like sandpaper or a scraper might.

    Heat the patch area again with a hair dryer. Apply your patch glue and let it dry. Then apply your rubber patch. If you can, use a clamp and some wood blocks to really compress the patch down overnight. The patch should hold up fine.
    GoTubeless.com - your source about tubeless tires
    Guides, Reviews, News, Articles, Videos

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by GoTubeless.com
    Clean the patch area off with a chemical cleaner like some liquid tire buffer from an auto store. This stuff is toxic so use gloves and care. It'll chemically clean the area really well and won't hurt the fabric like sandpaper or a scraper might.
    Thanks for the tip. I picked up some liquid tire buffer ($17/quart!! OUCH!) and now the patches will vulcanize like they're supposed to. I have the puncture surrounded by patch 1/2" all the way around. The puncture is still leaking-slowly. The patches are vulcanized very well, maybe the casing is just porous and air is seeping thru?? I'm going to try a large automotive patch and see what happens.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    24
    That quart should last you a long time. If the puncture is leaking slowly, you might see if some sealant will take care of things. Unless you can feel/hear air coming out of the puncture still.

    If you cleaned all the sealant out, you'll have lots of tiny holes that the sealant was plugging up. I usually say don't clean out the sealant residue from the inside of the tire. I'd say the casing is probably porous and once you fill it up with sealant it should take care of things.

    $17 is still cheaper than a new UST tire!
    GoTubeless.com - your source about tubeless tires
    Guides, Reviews, News, Articles, Videos

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •