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  1. #1
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    Tubeless tire with a sidewall tear

    I got about a MM crack/tear in the sidewall of my tire. Can I repair this or will I need to just run a tube?

    Thanks guys

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkidd_39 View Post
    I got about a MM crack/tear in the sidewall of my tire. Can I repair this or will I need to just run a tube?

    Thanks guys
    Need more details and pics
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  3. #3
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    Here is the best pic I got.. (crappy iphone pic)
    I put a tube in it and it's all better. I just kinda figured a punctured sidewall means the tire is bad, similar to automobiles..


    Thanks a lot.

  4. #4
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    I repair tubeless setups with sidewall rips all the time. take a regular glue style tube patch, clean the inside of the tire really well and glue the patch in... best if you actually put a clamp over the patch and really squeeze it till dry.

    tips...
    1. use a WAY big patch
    2. Clean, clean clean... can't stress this enough.. if you've been using sealant it gets into the pores and can make it easier for the patch to peel off. Scrub with a tooth brush and get into the edges and outside of the tear so there aren't an contaminates getting in there
    3. NEVER use the "roughening" - cheese grater tool the patches come with, you don't want to tear up the inside of the side wall, a tooth brush is enough....


    even if you don't get a 100% air seal, as long as it's holding the sealant will get in there and seal it up so don't sweat it if it's not perfect.
    been doing it for yrs and have dozens of patches in tires over the time, never once had an issue with a patch. and still running a tire on the front with some patches that are like 4 yrs old...

    heard of people using super glue, tried it once and it was OK and held, but it doesn't stretch with the tire and seem to make a weird pucker, wasn't happy with it for a long term repair.
    Last edited by thomllama; 01-07-2013 at 06:39 AM.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkidd_39 View Post
    Here is the best pic I got.. (crappy iphone pic)
    I put a tube in it and it's all better. I just kinda figured a punctured sidewall means the tire is bad, similar to automobiles..
    Do you have any fishing line? You could use a needle and stitch it up, then patch it on the inside following basic directions.

    I've got a Racing Ralph 2.4 that I tore about the same type of tear as what you picture in your photo. That was several seasons ago and the tire is still going strong tubeless after I stitched it and patched it.

    The worse case scenario - the patch doesn't hold and you're only out the cost of a patch and your labor before you buy a new tire. The best case scenario - you get many more miles of use out of it by patching it up correctly. Win-win either way - IMO.

    BB

  6. #6
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown View Post
    Do you have any fishing line? You could use a needle and stitch it up, then patch it on the inside following basic directions.

    I've got a Racing Ralph 2.4 that I tore about the same type of tear as what you picture in your photo. That was several seasons ago and the tire is still going strong tubeless after I stitched it and patched it.

    The worse case scenario - the patch doesn't hold and you're only out the cost of a patch and your labor before you buy a new tire. The best case scenario - you get many more miles of use out of it by patching it up correctly. Win-win either way - IMO.

    BB
    I would use dental floss rather than fishing line.
    Stitch it, a bit of Shoe Goo (let dry), patches inside and out.
    Need to do this using tubes or the tube just pushes out of the hole.
    A patch alone does not stabilize the casing.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    I would use dental floss rather than fishing line.
    Stitch it, a bit of Shoe Goo (let dry), patches inside and out.
    Need to do this using tubes or the tube just pushes out of the hole.
    A patch alone does not stabilize the casing.
    Floss will work fine. I just like black fishing line for cosmetic reasons so nobody sees it. I use bright green floss on my teeth, but not my torn tires.

    Good tip here about super glue and NoTubes sealant...

    Patching tubeless tire secret

    And PinBike's purposeful slashing and poking of tires followed by patching with various techniques is a classic from last year...

    Tech Tuesday - Three Ways to Save A Leaky Tubeless Tire - Pinkbike

  8. #8
    Ahhh the pain....
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    I just sliced a sidewall yesterday while a few miles from my car. Not a huge deal to walk out but since I carry a curved needle and thread(dental floss), I decided to give it a try...worked awesome...no walking needed! Plus, never broke the bead loose so if I had to ride further, I would not have had to given up running tubeless.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tubeless tire with a sidewall tear-015.jpg  

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  9. #9
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    I have had good luck repairing numerous tires by patching them both on the sidewall and the center tread in different cases. I actually use a car tire vulcanizer press with no glue. This type of vulcanizer can have heat applied to the tire and patch which normally is reserved for car tires, although I have never used heat or glue. They are not bike patches but car tire patches. You can probably accomplish the same results with a clamp and press. I have left it on the press for as little as 20 mins and as long as overnight with no failures.

  10. #10
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    Never had an issue with the patch alone. Patched 1" slices without issue. Again use glue type, and clamp it. When you clamp the glue gets on the edges of the tear and holds it. Running both tires held like that now. 1 hole in front and 2 tears on the rear. No problems
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
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    I would throw that away as I ride some cliffs. $50, done. If you really ride low risk trails, and your insurance is paid, above suggestions are awesome. I glue patched a ripped new sidewall for my Mt bike that only gets used for street/training. Put a tube in. Then as I thought about it, I tossed the tire. Too much risk.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoolie View Post
    I would throw that away as I ride some cliffs. $50, done. If you really ride low risk trails, and your insurance is paid, above suggestions are awesome. I glue patched a ripped new sidewall for my Mt bike that only gets used for street/training. Put a tube in. Then as I thought about it, I tossed the tire. Too much risk.
    Yet you'll drive around on car tires that have been plugged and patched, right?

  13. #13
    Poacher
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    Nope. Not on a sidewall. Tire shops will not even fix a punctured sidewall for Auto.

  14. #14
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    I'm running Stan's tubeless fat larry. I "glued" a 6mm sidewall tear from the outside using selley's quickfix ultrarepair. Selleys Quick Fix Ultra Repair Glue | Selleys New Zealand. It's a flexible polymer adhesive that will glue rubber.

    Trick was to let the tyre go almost flat but still keep its shape, apply fairly generously and give about 5 -10 minutes (enjoy the view, have a snack etc) before re-inflating.

    Never tried it before and was thinking it was only temporary, but still riding 400km later!

  15. #15
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    Hi All, I just cut my sidewall on my garage door rails while flipping my bike around. Such a stupid way to damage an expensive tire. Looks to be a 5mm gash. Per Thomllama's post, I'll try using a large rubber patch with the adhesive.

    I'm supposed to ride right after work. I guess if I don't want to damage the tire any further (for future use) I might go back home during lunch and throw my brand new spare tire on there and work on repair this one over the weekend.

    Tubeless tire with a sidewall tear-cut-tire.jpg
    Just get out and ride!

  16. #16
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002 View Post
    Hi All, I just cut my sidewall on my garage door rails while flipping my bike around. Such a stupid way to damage an expensive tire. Looks to be a 5mm gash. Per Thomllama's post, I'll try using a large rubber patch with the adhesive.

    I'm supposed to ride right after work. I guess if I don't want to damage the tire any further (for future use) I might go back home during lunch and throw my brand new spare tire on there and work on repair this one over the weekend.
    if you have a spare, you're probably better off as the key to a good repair is cleaning and clamping till dry which takes time (PS use wax paper if you have it to keep the clamp from gluing to the patch learned that the hard way :/ )
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

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