Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 201 to 300 of 543
  1. #201
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    454
    Have you tried acetone?

  2. #202
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    Gorilla tape seems to work pretty well until you want to remove it. I can't help with the adhesive removal. As said above, acetone might work. Maybe you should have left it on.

    I have used Stan's for many years and been very happy. Easy to remove.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  3. #203
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    119
    Thanks guys.
    I haven't tried acetone yet. I'm going to give Goo Gone a try this evening.

    As I said in my original post, I had no intention of using Gorilla tape for tubeless; stan's is what I've used for the last 4 years and have never had any issues. The Gorilla tape was suggested by my friend who built my wheels, just so we could put tubes and tires in to simply test out the bike build before my Stan's kit arrived.

    Thanks.

    Again anyone with first hand experience with a similar situation, your advice would be most welcome... looking at how to get this mess cleaned up so I can use the Stan's kit.

    Cheers

  4. #204
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,491
    x2 for acetone (or fingernail polish remover).

  5. #205
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    Others have mentioned it, but I use Kapton tape on mtb and road setups up to 100 psi. Sticks great, easily conforms to the rim profile, and leaves no adhesive residue when removed. I've even poke a hole in it to access a nipple and replace a spoke then patched the hole with a short piece of tape.

  6. #206
    Fossil
    Reputation: mtmiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    434
    Quote Originally Posted by crankarms View Post
    Thanks guys.
    I haven't tried acetone yet. I'm going to give Goo Gone a try this evening.

    As I said in my original post, I had no intention of using Gorilla tape for tubeless; stan's is what I've used for the last 4 years and have never had any issues. The Gorilla tape was suggested by my friend who built my wheels, just so we could put tubes and tires in to simply test out the bike build before my Stan's kit arrived.

    Thanks.

    Again anyone with first hand experience with a similar situation, your advice would be most welcome... looking at how to get this mess cleaned up so I can use the Stan's kit.

    Cheers
    Acetone will work.

    That said, there's sort of a hierarchy of solvents I use if damaging a finish is a concern. It's mostly based on what I have laying around. I usually start with Windex, then move to WD40, then alcohol, then mineral spirits / paint thinner, then acetone. Acetone pretty much never fails.
    DB Dirt Club
    DBs on Dirt since 2010

  7. #207
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by mtmiller View Post
    Acetone will work.

    That said, there's sort of a hierarchy of solvents I use if damaging a finish is a concern. It's mostly based on what I have laying around. I usually start with Windex, then move to WD40, then alcohol, then mineral spirits / paint thinner, then acetone. Acetone pretty much never fails.
    Thanks all for your help, it was much appreciated. I want to give a little update just in case somebody else comes along and finds they've ended up in same situation (and don't have clue as to what to do)....

    I went at one of the rims tonight with some Goo Gone and a scotch pad?. At first I was a little discouraged, however when I rubbed it on liberally and gave it a little time to work, I started to make some headway. I gave up on the scotch pad and tried some other utensils to see what would work best. What seemed to work was a couple of rags, one dry and one damp with Goo Gone, a good size tire lever and one of those little hard thin squares of plastic people use to scrape stoneware (cooking) since you can't clean it with soap.
    Sometimes I wrapped the edge of the scraper or tire lever in one of the rags to get at those tight spots and some times I used them directly on the rim.
    I also worked on areas for a while and then moved on and came back around to that same area again. This gave the Goo a little more time to work in. Anyway I kept going around and around adding Goo and scraping, rubbing and cleaning. I'm happy to say the rim looks pretty good. Hopefully I can setup for tubeless.
    Hope that helps.

    I have a follow-up question for readers. I'm going to go at the other rim tomorrow night. I haven't attempted to remove the Gorilla tape yet so I'm wondering ...does it make sense to try heating the tape with a hair dryer while I'm taking it off. Would that make it easier to remove and hopefully reduce the amount of residue that gets left behind?

    All views welcomed.
    Thanks
    J

  8. #208
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    I can't speak for Gorilla tape adhesive residue removal, but heat is frequently used to facilitate various film removals, I would think it could help. It didn't sound fun on the previous attempt.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  9. #209
    MCMXCV
    Reputation: D Bone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,151
    Went tubeless for about 8 months and 3 tire changes, and went back to tubes.

    The first tire change (WTB TrailBoss TCS) stuck to the factory Easton tape on my Easton Heist wheelset and pulled it up upon dismount, so I retaped with blue 3M, but at least there was no sticky residue to clean from the factory tape.

    Then the second tires (Specialized Ground Control Grid) stuck to the blue tape and pulled it up on dismount requiring a retape after 30 minutes removing the sticky 3M residue.

    I mounted WTB Vigilante TCS and after their life was over, you guessed it, they stuck to the tape requiring another residue removal.

    That was the final straw. The pros do not outweigh the cons for me, as I don't like the flat tire feeling that running tires well below their optimal PSI offers, so I actually run the same PSI tubed or tubeless (28/33).

    I also use Stans in my tubes so small punctures are not a problem for me............... I actually had more issues on the trail running tubeless than I ever had tubed.

    Just my experience, and .02

  10. #210
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    ^^^ No doubt that everyone might experience different issues with whatever they choose to do. This is D Bone's experience and that's too bad it didn't work as planned for him. I have never experienced any tape issues that D Bone did on any of my wheel-sets. I have one set of wheels with the original Stan's tape that is more than 6 years old, has experienced dozens and dozens of tire swaps and well over 10,000 miles. The tape remains as it did when new. Perhaps this is just luck, but it seems to be the case across all of my wheels.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  11. #211
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I can't speak for Gorilla tape adhesive residue removal, but heat is frequently used to facilitate various film removals, I would think it could help. It didn't sound fun on the previous attempt.
    Thanks C2L, I'll give it a try.

  12. #212
    change is good
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,739
    Quote Originally Posted by crankarms View Post
    Thanks C2L, I'll give it a try.
    I didn't check the past posts so I don't know if your rims are carbon, but heat can damage carbon.

    After messing with Gorilla tape, Tyvex, and strapping tape and adhesive removal I looked at the time I spent. It's much less expensive to buy the big roll of Stans and reapply if the tape starts to pull up when I switch tires which it usually doesn't.

  13. #213
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    I didn't check the past posts so I don't know if your rims are carbon, but heat can damage carbon.

    After messing with Gorilla tape, Tyvex, and strapping tape and adhesive removal I looked at the time I spent. It's much less expensive to buy the big roll of Stans and reapply if the tape starts to pull up when I switch tires which it usually doesn't.
    Not Carbon.
    And yes exactly, if you see my previous post this was just supposed to be a temp exercise to test the bike set up while I was waiting for my stans kit to arrive. Lesson learned, never again.
    I too have used stans in the past with my 26er (4+ years) with the same strip... never an issue

    Thanks

  14. #214
    change is good
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,739
    Quote Originally Posted by crankarms View Post
    Not Carbon.
    And yes exactly, if you see my previous post this was just supposed to be a temp exercise to test the bike set up while I was waiting for my stans kit to arrive. Lesson learned, never again.
    I too have used stans in the past with my 26er (4+ years) with the same strip... never an issue

    Thanks
    You're smarter than me. It took me three times removing that crap from my carbon rims before I learned. So much profanity........

  15. #215
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    I didn't check the past posts so I don't know if your rims are carbon, but heat can damage carbon.

    Generally speaking, carbon fiber composites can tolerate very high temperature ranges coupled with low coefficient of thermal expansion. Commonly found in many high temp applications in aerospace. The predominate factor is the resins used and their specific requirements or application.

    However, in most cases that I can think of, the use of low-grade heat to facilitate removal any applied tapes on carbon wheels would be far below any inherent design limitations.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  16. #216
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    6
    Deleted

  17. #217
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by snipes287 View Post
    I think 90% of this comes down to the lack of knowledge on how to tape properly specially from the people that say their tape doesn't stick, shifts or sealant penetration. All tape will stick well if you do this properly. Three VERY important steps to this.

    1) Spray some BRAKE CLEANER (from automotive store or if you use a bike product Finish Line Speed degreaser is the better of them) into a clean rag and clean inside of rims really well. Brake cleaner and the finish line spray do not leave a residue and this is extremely important. Now use rubbing or denatured alchohol on a NEW rag to finish cleaning the rim. Make sure to get every spec of dirt/sealant that you can see. The more time you spend cleaning the better off you will be. Once cleaned don't touch any part of the inside of the rim. This is all pretty commonsense, now for the piece de resistance!

    2)WARM THE RIM UP! In the 17 years ive been a wrench i can tell you this is the most important step with ANY adhesive based liner, tubeless or tubed. You can use a heat gun, blow dryer or blowtorch (not carbon) to warm the rim up. Your not making the rim hot only warming it enough to not be cold. This allows the adhesive from the tape to soften, adhere much better and spread more evenly leaving no channels for the sealant to get under. (not responsible for you de tempering your rim or damaging your rim)

    3) when you cut the tape don't cut it straight across "---" it needs to be cut at a diagonal "/". It has much higher sheering strength this way. On a side note if you have a road bike and the tape securing your bar tape keeps coming a little undone cut it at a diagonal and your problem will be solved.

    Ive used a TON of different tapes in my days and VERY rarely have any problems with any of them shifting, or not adhering or sealant migrating under the tape or whatever else everyone is having problems with. Ive literally done hundreds and hundreds of conversions and maybe 1% of them have had a problem.

    Hope this helps ya'll and i promise it will make your lives easier.
    Thanks

  18. #218
    change is good
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,739
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Generally speaking, carbon fiber composites can tolerate very high temperature ranges coupled with low coefficient of thermal expansion. Commonly found in many high temp applications in aerospace. The predominate factor is the resins used and their specific requirements or application.

    However, in most cases that I can think of, the use of low-grade heat to facilitate removal any applied tapes on carbon wheels would be far below any inherent design limitations.
    It seems you're more knowledgeable regarding this than I am. Although it's not rocket science use of a heat gun requires a certain amount of skill.

  19. #219
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gmats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,139
    Quote Originally Posted by crankarms View Post
    Thanks guys.
    I haven't tried acetone yet. I'm going to give Goo Gone a try this evening.

    As I said in my original post, I had no intention of using Gorilla tape for tubeless; stan's is what I've used for the last 4 years and have never had any issues. The Gorilla tape was suggested by my friend who built my wheels, just so we could put tubes and tires in to simply test out the bike build before my Stan's kit arrived.

    Thanks.

    Again anyone with first hand experience with a similar situation, your advice would be most welcome... looking at how to get this mess cleaned up so I can use the Stan's kit.

    Cheers
    I've used WD40. It's a great sticky/gooey remover. Kerosene works great too. I've personally used both. I follow up with acetone to clean the surface prior to putting down my new tape (I've been using Kapton tape for some time now). Much lighter and works great!

  20. #220
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Generally speaking, carbon fiber composites can tolerate very high temperature ranges coupled with low coefficient of thermal expansion. Commonly found in many high temp applications in aerospace. The predominate factor is the resins used and their specific requirements or application.

    However, in most cases that I can think of, the use of low-grade heat to facilitate removal any applied tapes on carbon wheels would be far below any inherent design limitations.
    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    It seems you're more knowledgeable regarding this than I am. Although it's not rocket science use of a heat gun requires a certain amount of skill.
    I agree... you could be correct with using a heat gun, but I think the OP spoke of using a hair dryer. I don't think that would present any problems.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  21. #221
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    119
    A quick update...

    I went at the second rim tonight and as stated earlier I used a hair dryer to heat up the Gorilla tape as I was taking it off.

    I took it off in sections. I preheated a section I was going to remove and then begin peeling it off, heating the underside as I pulled back on the tape (as opposed to just pulling straight up).
    Huge, huge difference compared to the rim I did without heat last night. When I was done this one had a fraction of the gunk in comparison to the other one. Used some Goo Gone, and I was done in about 20 mins. Thanks again to all who offered advise.

    Hope this post finds the next poor soul who ends up having a similar tape experience.
    J

  22. #222
    change is good
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    2,739
    Cool. I learned something.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  23. #223
    Ride 'Til Your Knees Hurt
    Reputation: cycljunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,044
    Have a set of Canfield Brothers 29er wheels for a new bike build. Used 1" Gorilla Tape from Home Depot. I started the tape at the 3rd spoke hole from the valve stem hole, wrapped the rim once, then overlapped to the 3rd spoke hole on the other side of the valve stem hole. Using Stans 35mm "Universal" valve stems. Also running Maxxis TR tires (Ardent 2.4 / Ardent 2.25). Will air them up tonight with Stans sealant and post a follow up.

  24. #224
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    Quote Originally Posted by gmats View Post
    I've used WD40. It's a great sticky/gooey remover. Kerosene works great too...I follow up with acetone to clean the surface ...
    OMS is WD40 without the light lube and kerosene with without the obscene smell. For ultimate cleanup afterwards, use lacquer thinner.

    Actually, the lightweight lube in WD40 helps with goo removal as it doesn't evaporate but it will interfere with the adhesion of subsequent rim tape.

    Gorilla tape is thick, heavy and messy; a redneck solution of if there ever was one. Kapton tape is thin, extremely lightweight, and leaves no adhesive residue; a much more sophisticated and erudite solution.

  25. #225
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,536
    Will maybe look into this Kapton tape you speak of.

    Black Gorilla tape is still my favorite. Peeling and shifting is remedied by being sure to use the proper width. No issues with my home brew sealant. The left over gum is not that big a deal. I use my thumbs and some old fashioned elbow grease to work it off on the rare occasion I need to retape.

    Stan's does not stick well to carbon nor does it conform well to rims with a deep center channel.

  26. #226
    Ride 'Til Your Knees Hurt
    Reputation: cycljunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,044
    1" Gorilla Tape, wrapped once (overlap @ valve stem). Tires aired up @ 30psi and beads seated properly. Maxis Arrrrrrrrrrrrrdent TR tires (2 4 / 2.25). So far so good. Trying to finish up my bike build tonight.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  27. #227
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    585
    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    Derby only recommends an 18mm width. His rims have a channel though. I believe going wall to wall on rims with hookless beads is unnecessary?
    That's the way Ray explained it too me. I'm replacing my Orange tape after +2 hard years on my wheels. I have 29'er rims that are 29 inner width. Wheel builders put the Orange tape on that were deliver with the rims. It was the 18mm flavor. Only trouble area developed after roughly putting an emergency tube in on a back country ride. Caused minor scooching of the tape and eventually exposed one of the spoke holes. I am a clyde and have been running 29-35 PSI in my rear tire. One wrap of the orange tape has seemed to hold up pretty well. I think Derby is also correct in recommending the 18mm width for his rims. Creates a better seal between just the rubber and CF without the edge of the tape to consider. Also makes it much easier to take tires on and off.
    I do appreciate the extra tip of warming up the rim prior to install. Makes sense.

    Cheers,
    Mike

  28. #228
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,264
    I've been having problems with my gorilla clear tape tubeless setup. Took the tire off and cleaned the rim. The tape around some of the spoke holes did this funky fold thing where the tape was in excess so much that it raised up and formed a ridge. I've seen tape pull away before or create a channel under it, but never create a ridge. When I put the tape on, it was pulled tight. Before setting it up tubeless, I put in a tube and kept it pressurized at 45 psi for a week. Everything looked good, flat, and sealed then. I've re-taped the rim and I'm letting it sit with a tube in it now. I guess I'll see how it does.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  29. #229
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Others have mentioned it, but I use Kapton tape on mtb and road setups up to 100 psi. Sticks great, easily conforms to the rim profile, and leaves no adhesive residue when removed. I've even poke a hole in it to access a nipple and replace a spoke then patched the hole with a short piece of tape.
    Had hell with Kapton tape for my rear wheels. The rims are offset, so the nipple holes are too. The Kapton would just roll a little when the tyres were mounted, and then there would be exposed edges of the holes. Worked fine for the front. Velo tape solved the issue.

    Now, I've ordered the 66 meter Stans tape.

  30. #230
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    133
    FYI

    All you folks cleaning your rims with (insert name here, wd40,goo gone, acetone, etc) make sure you 100% you get all of that cleaned out. What will happen with things like goo gone is that you will put it on a rag on directly on the residue in the rim and rub it off..While you are doing this goo gone travels down slightly into the nipple holes and sits there. You will retape over the leftover goo gone that's in the nipple hole and then a few weeks later wonder why your tape is coming up around the nipple holes. That's why.. That goo gone leaks back down onto it. Acetone wont do this but googone/wd40 will. So if you use those to clean residue, makes sure to wash the rim with soap and water and let it fully dry. Or just don't use gorilla tape (black) and you wont have to clean that stuff out.

  31. #231
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,248
    Just got done screwing with that garbage Stan's tape on Easton ARC 27 rims. The tape is a too stiff and simply doesn't stick. What a waste. It's odd bc the Stan's tape worked liked a charm on my other set of Flow EX rims. Time to get some Gorilla Tape at the hardware store.
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower 29er
    2016 Chromag Surface 27.5+
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er
    2017 Motobecane Lurch FS 26 fat

  32. #232
    transmitter~receiver
    Reputation: meltingfeather's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    9,276
    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    Just got done screwing with that garbage Stan's tape on Easton ARC 27 rims. The tape is a too stiff and simply doesn't stick. What a waste. It's odd bc the Stan's tape worked liked a charm on my other set of Flow EX rims. Time to get some Gorilla Tape at the hardware store.
    Rim prep is your problem, not the tape.
    Gorilla is crap, but it will probably mask your poor prep problem.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  33. #233
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    I can't say an thing about the Easton wheels, but I've done plenty of tape jobs, all with Stan's and I've never experieneed any problems.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  34. #234
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,248
    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    Rim prep is your problem, not the tape.
    Gorilla is crap, but it will probably mask your poor prep problem.
    So cleaning the rim with rubbing alcohol is poor prep? You seem to know a lot about me based on the few sentences I typed.
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower 29er
    2016 Chromag Surface 27.5+
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er
    2017 Motobecane Lurch FS 26 fat

  35. #235
    mtbr member
    Reputation: EddieSmirckx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    So cleaning the rim with rubbing alcohol is poor prep? You seem to know a lot about me based on the few sentences I typed.
    Rubbing alcohol is what I use, too. It's cheap, readily available, works fine, evaporates completely with no residue, and it's safe for carbon rims. Why use anything else?

  36. #236
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gmats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,139
    Quote Originally Posted by combfilter View Post
    FYI

    All you folks cleaning your rims with (insert name here, wd40,goo gone, acetone, etc) make sure you 100% you get all of that cleaned out. What will happen with things like goo gone is that you will put it on a rag on directly on the residue in the rim and rub it off..While you are doing this goo gone travels down slightly into the nipple holes and sits there. You will retape over the leftover goo gone that's in the nipple hole and then a few weeks later wonder why your tape is coming up around the nipple holes. That's why.. That goo gone leaks back down onto it. Acetone wont do this but googone/wd40 will. So if you use those to clean residue, makes sure to wash the rim with soap and water and let it fully dry. Or just don't use gorilla tape (black) and you wont have to clean that stuff out.
    Absolutely. That's a great point. And Remember, it's clean but the original Stans set up years ago had us sanding the inside of the rim to make sure it was absolutely clean. This still pertains. The tape has to have an extremely clean surface to stick to and any solvent inside of the spoke holes or in the rim will only desolve the tape's glue.

  37. #237
    transmitter~receiver
    Reputation: meltingfeather's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    9,276
    Quote Originally Posted by VTSession View Post
    So cleaning the rim with rubbing alcohol is poor prep? You seem to know a lot about me based on the few sentences I typed.
    Dood, calm down. I don't know anything about you.
    What I do know is that if Stan's tape doesn't stick it's due to surface prep. It's not rocket science. You might watch the rim prep videos Stan has made. Calling it garbage is pretty shortsighted.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  38. #238
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    482
    No one has mentioned regular old duct tape. I used some last night cuz I didn't feel like going to the bike shop.

    I'm guessing this was a bad idea since no one has mentioned it yet. Please let me know why so others can learn. :-)

  39. #239
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    ^^^ You be aware of why it's not the preferred tape come time for removal. Perhaps I can see using it as an emergency situation where you wanna ride and nothing else is around...maybe. There are usually plenty of better readily available alternatives.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  40. #240
    mtbr member
    Reputation: EddieSmirckx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by Skelldify View Post
    No one has mentioned regular old duct tape. I used some last night cuz I didn't feel like going to the bike shop.

    I'm guessing this was a bad idea since no one has mentioned it yet. Please let me know why so others can learn. :-)
    If duct tape is working for ya, don't worry about what anyone else says. This place is Trollsville sometimes. For every strongly held opinion you'll find an equally passionate opposite. At the end of the day it's just tape. Just about any kind that is sticky on one side will work if you're careful about it. This ain't like curing cancer or putting people on the moon...

  41. #241
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,264
    IMO it depends on the type of duct tape. If you're talking about a cheap silver backed duct tape from the dollar store, you're going to have problems. It'll stick and make a mess, but the silver backing is insanely thin and will peel away. A good quality duct tape, similar to gorilla tape, should be fine.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  42. #242
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,919
    I bought a couple of rolls of this. Doesn't stretch and is not super adhesive but sticks well enough and leaves no residue. I'll see about durability...
    It is very light though

    30mm Width x 30M Length Heat High Temperature Resistant Adhesive Tape Brown | eBay
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tubeless Tape Thread-screen-shot-2016-08-06-9.00.34-am.jpg  

    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  43. #243
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    ^ hard to tell by the pix and the description but that looks like Kapton tape, which is what I use. It's a transparent amber color. 1 mil thick with a couple of mils of adhesive. It's very tough and has enough stretch to conform the the shape of the rim bed.

  44. #244
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,919
    I was trying to find Kapton and my search led me to this Chinese tape. Could be the same. It does conform the the rim ok. I'm hoping the weight savings over Gorilla tape will transfer into much faster climbing
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  45. #245
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,919
    Free shipping from China!
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  46. #246
    Land of the 230+
    Reputation: GuitsBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    2,274
    Looks for "polyamide" tape. Kapton is the brand name.

  47. #247
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    ^^^yeah. That's why it's capitalized...like Teflon, Delrin, Lexan, Lycra, Spandex, etc...

  48. #248
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    820
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I was trying to find Kapton and my search led me to this Chinese tape. Could be the same. It does conform the the rim ok. I'm hoping the weight savings over Gorilla tape will transfer into much faster climbing
    Found this Kapton tape in Canada. Big jump from 10mm to 100mm though. Or this from Amazon. Much better pricing than the 60M of Stan's Tape on Amazon that was $50+$50 for shipping to Canada.

    Went to the LBS today and dropped $20 on 9M of Stan's Tape today. I've been on Gorilla Tape for a few years. Yesterday was the tipping point for GT. A valve stem leakage resulted in not being able to ride yesterday. Pull the tire off this AM; tape I installed yesterday has already pulled over nipple holes and folded in places. :/
    Actually somewhat surprised the LBS had a roll of Stan's Tape.

    I'm unsure to why I had the valve leakage. The Stan's valve doesn't appear to be damaged in anyway. Likely will install a new valve stem when I do the Stan's Tape to rule out the valve. Reusing a Stan's Valve hasn't given myself grief before now. Do people put a dab of silicon around the valve stem before installation to prevent leakage? Other than that I may've put too large of a hole in the Gorilla Tape...

  49. #249
    Short-Change-Hero
    Reputation: gregnash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,448
    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    Found this Kapton tape in Canada. Big jump from 10mm to 100mm though. Or this from Amazon. Much better pricing than the 60M of Stan's Tape on Amazon that was $50+$50 for shipping to Canada.

    Went to the LBS today and dropped $20 on 9M of Stan's Tape today. I've been on Gorilla Tape for a few years. Yesterday was the tipping point for GT. A valve stem leakage resulted in not being able to ride yesterday. Pull the tire off this AM; tape I installed yesterday has already pulled over nipple holes and folded in places. :/
    Actually somewhat surprised the LBS had a roll of Stan's Tape.

    I'm unsure to why I had the valve leakage. The Stan's valve doesn't appear to be damaged in anyway. Likely will install a new valve stem when I do the Stan's Tape to rule out the valve. Reusing a Stan's Valve hasn't given myself grief before now. Do people put a dab of silicon around the valve stem before installation to prevent leakage? Other than that I may've put too large of a hole in the Gorilla Tape...
    Ran into the same problem recently with Gorilla tape, two times using the 1" wide tape and a third using the 2" wide cut to fit just inside the bead seat. All leaked at the valve for me as well and that is with Stans Universal valves and a DT Swiss tubeless valve on WTB i29 rims which are tubeless.

    Conclusion is have come to is they NEED the tubeless tape now as Gorilla has changed something that no longer works well with our tubeless setups. I have yet to try my WTB 34mm wide tape for the i29 as recommended by WTB as I broke my leg after last swap to a tube when the tubeless wouldn't setup.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  50. #250
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    820
    Quote Originally Posted by gregnash View Post
    Ran into the same problem recently with Gorilla tape, two times using the 1" wide tape and a third using the 2" wide cut to fit just inside the bead seat. All leaked at the valve for me as well and that is with Stans Universal valves and a DT Swiss tubeless valve on WTB i29 rims which are tubeless.

    Conclusion is have come to is they NEED the tubeless tape now as Gorilla has changed something that no longer works well with our tubeless setups. I have yet to try my WTB 34mm wide tape for the i29 as recommended by WTB as I broke my leg after last swap to a tube when the tubeless wouldn't setup.
    I'm firmly entrenched with the anti-Gorilla Tape camp as of today.

    Installed one wrap + a bit of Stan's Tape and a fresh 44mm valve stem. Installed the tire with my hands (previously needed tire levers with this rim/tire combo.) Inflated and seated the bead with a floor pump, as I have done in the past. I'm somewhat disappointed that I didn't try the previous valve stem, but I was frustrated with the lack of riding time as of late. The two variables aside, I'm just happy the tire installation was relatively easy. No tire levers or hand injuries!

  51. #251
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    I have been using 1" Gorilla tape on my rims lately and I want to try something better. Looking at Kapton tape hoping that I can buy one width that will work on several rims: what width? I have a KOM i25 rim on my front mtb, Stans Arch EX rear, and DT swiss x430s (18.4mm ID) on my CX bike with a tubeless kludge. I can get 30mm Kapton tape, but will that be useless on the CX wheels? Can I install it and cut away the excess, of is that prohibitively cumbersome to do?
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 08-08-2016 at 11:03 AM.

  52. #252
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    3,341
    20mm Kapton tape will work fine, it's what I use on my rims which are 21-25mm internal width. I go with 2 full layers on the rims since I don't quite trust a single layer, on the wider rims you can offset the first wrap to one side and the 2nd layer to the other, such that the entire rim bed is covered and the nipple holes have a double layer on them all the way around. I didn't bother to do the offset wrap on my 25mm rim and it still works fine, but Spank Industries (the makers of my rims) recommends the offset wrap method.

  53. #253
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    maybe I missed something, but how does Kapton tape work? I just got some, stretched a double layer on my rim, then went to poke a hole for the valve and the tape split in half and started falling off the rim. I tried it again, same thing. how do you get a hole in Kapton take without it falling apart?

  54. #254
    mtbr member
    Reputation: manitou2200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,976
    It wouldn't use kapton tape. I'd use tyvek tape before kapton. You also don't want to trim the tape on the rim that's a bad idea. Make a cutter to trim it on the roll. Gorilla tape is ok if you need to tighten up the rim to tire bead bottom seal. The only time I had to do that was mounting my non TR 120 tpi Kard's on my Dually rims.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Function in disaster, finish in style.

  55. #255
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    I am asking all the people who have apparently used Kapton tape with success.

  56. #256
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I am asking all the people who have apparently used Kapton tape with success.
    I have used Kapton tape with success. Not sure why yours split. Maybe you stretched it too tight (which i would think is damn impossible to do, but maybe you are Hulk).

    Also, not sure why the dude above said not to cut it while on the rim. I've done that with tyvek, kapton, and that green amazon stuff all the time. Typically the tape I use is a little wider than my inner rim width. So I will lay down layer 1 and then I will take and xacto knife/blade and just cut away the excess 2-3mm of tape that is going up the bead wall. Just stick the blade down in the corner of the rim where the bead wall/bead lock is and cut away. Then peel up that excess 2-3mm. The location of where I stick the blade of the xacto knife is on this pic labeled "bead lock"
    https://www.acebike.com/images/offse...ologies_03.jpg

    After I cut the excess away I take a sponge and slowly press down all the tape as best as I can making sure that the edge of all my tape is really really pressed down and sticking to the rim.

  57. #257
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    I pulled it pretty tight and tried poking a hole with a heated awl. It immediately split in half and strated curling up and falling off. I wrapped the tape again and tried to poke it with the sharp tip of a knife, same result.

    Sending it back. I am just going to accecpt being raped by the price of Stan's ir WTB tape.

  58. #258
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I pulled it pretty tight and tried poking a hole with a heated awl. It immediately split in half and strated curling up and falling off. I wrapped the tape again and tried to poke it with the sharp tip of a knife, same result.

    Sending it back. I am just going to accecpt being raped by the price of Stan's ir WTB tape.
    That's the whole point of this thread. Not to get raped for 22.00 and only be able to do 1 set of wheels with that.

    Here dude.. Get this. It will work for you with very little cutting (maybe none at all depending on your inner rim width). check to make sure it will fit. This tape is cheap and works well. Works really well. I need to add it to the front page actually.

    https://www.amazon.com/Maxi-248-Poly.../dp/B00EP22NKY

    Or go get some Tyvek tape. You will have to cut it down to size though. Someone posted a link to some 1 3/4" tyvek on an earlier thread.

    If you want a super long term solution and don't super high PSI you can use gorilla clear. Some have reported it blowing out at spoke holes at high psi, but they typically are using just one layer.

  59. #259
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    133
    Marker Post:
    updated OP with a few notes and some of the powder coating tapes. Let me know if I am missing a proven tape that is not on the front page.

  60. #260
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    Wider tapes i have tried. It was too much hassle to cut it. With all the time I have spent experimenting with unconventional tapes I could have just bought some purpose made tape and been done with it. I build my own wheels built all of my bikes from the frame-up and service my own Forks. This is just more hassle than it's worth

  61. #261
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    3,341
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    maybe I missed something, but how does Kapton tape work? I just got some, stretched a double layer on my rim, then went to poke a hole for the valve and the tape split in half and started falling off the rim. I tried it again, same thing. how do you get a hole in Kapton take without it falling apart?
    Couple things. You don't need to stretch the hell out of it like you do with Stan's tape, all you need is just enough tension to get the tape to conform to the rim. This usually keeps the tape from splitting and coming off the rim, or if does split, it stays stuck down. If the tape splits, just cut a 6-8" long piece and tape it over the valve hole WITHOUT putting tension on it, then poke the hole again.

  62. #262
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Wider tapes i have tried. It was too much hassle to cut it. With all the time I have spent experimenting with unconventional tapes I could have just bought some purpose made tape and been done with it. I build my own wheels built all of my bikes from the frame-up and service my own Forks. This is just more hassle than it's worth
    wow as a fellow wheel builder and bike builder I don't know what to say. if running an xacto knife around your rim 1x is too much work, I really don't know what to say. I think it takes literally 10 seconds? Plus another 15-30 seconds to peel away the overlapped cut tape.

    Purpose made tapes? You think stans tape was specifically made for stans?

  63. #263
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    Quote Originally Posted by aerius View Post
    Couple things. You don't need to stretch the hell out of it like you do with Stan's tape, all you need is just enough tension to get the tape to conform to the rim. This usually keeps the tape from splitting and coming off the rim, or if does split, it stays stuck down. If the tape splits, just cut a 6-8" long piece and tape it over the valve hole WITHOUT putting tension on it, then poke the hole again.
    Sorry for the outburst. I just had a frustration morning being humiliated by my bike doing what I thought would be an easy job.

    Yes, now that I have had time to think about it, I must have pulled the tape too hard and split it with the tension. I am used to Stans and Gorilla tape, which you have to stretch pretty darn hard to make it fit. Since I have yards of the stuff, I can give it another go. Thanks!

    How many layers of Kapton should I need on a Stans rim?

    I tried wider tape but i could not keep it from splitting. Maybe I just don't have the steadiness to cut it evenly and maybe I was stretching it too tight in the first place. If I had access to a tool to cut it down nice and clean, perhaps that would have been less of a headache.

  64. #264
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    3,341
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    How many layers of Kapton should I need on a Stans rim?
    I generally go with 2 full layers, starting on the side opposite the valve hole. This lets me put the patch piece over the valve hole if I need it without making that area too thick.

  65. #265
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,264
    Kapton tape to create a bead shelf lip? anything else that works well? Strong adhessive, thick, hard plastic. I have a SR-25 rim that I've split tube before, and it worked pretty good. It was a absolute pain to get that split tube off of there though. Had to use an exacto knife to cut the tube underneath the tire.

    I'd like to build up a little bit of a lip to help retain the bead lock. WTB does a great job with this, but sunringle does a horrible job. Especially on their inferno rims and that U shape. At least the SR25 has a bead shelf.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  66. #266
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    I thought Sun were using BST design licensed from Stan's. Is that still relevant?

  67. #267
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    6,264
    I think some are, but some older rims, especially low end ones, don't.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  68. #268
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Kapton tape to create a bead shelf lip? anything else that works well?.
    Kapton is thin, you want thick tape for rims that don't have a tubeless-specific bead shelf. I have my CX bike with non-tubeless rims set up with two layers of Gorilla tape and WTB tcs tires. The bead on those tires is very tight, so it works well.

  69. #269
    mtbr member
    Reputation: manitou2200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,976
    Quote Originally Posted by combfilter View Post

    Also, not sure why the dude above said not to cut it while on the rim. I've done that with tyvek, kapton, and that green amazon stuff all the time. Typically the tape I use is a little wider than my inner rim width. So I will lay down layer 1 and then I will take and xacto knife/blade and just cut away the excess 2-3mm of tape that is going up the bead wall. Just stick the blade down in the corner of the rim where the bead wall/bead lock is and cut away. Then peel up that excess 2-3mm. The location of where I stick the blade of the xacto knife is on this pic labeled "bead lock"
    https://www.acebike.com/images/offse...ologies_03.jpg

    After I cut the excess away I take a sponge and slowly press down all the tape as best as I can making sure that the edge of all my tape is really really pressed down and sticking to the rim.
    You ask why I said not to trim the tape on the rim? Are you f'ng kidding me?
    First off you're compromising your carbon rim by actually scoring it. That's like asking for a failure and as a matter of fact you should ask the rim manufacturer what they think of this idea to trim the tape on the rim. They'll tell you you just voided your warranty! LOL
    Second thing is trimming the roll is about 100 times faster and more accurate than what you're doing and if you plan correctly you may be able to use the opposite side of the cut so you waste less.
    Third if it's an aluminum rim you've just created a burr and again weakened the rim by scoring it.
    Should I go on or do you know see how idiotic your idea is?
    It's so easy to mount a utility knife blade to a block of wood with a fence to set the width of the trimmer that you'll be thinking; WTF was I thinking!
    Function in disaster, finish in style.

  70. #270
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    Quote Originally Posted by manitou2200 View Post
    You ask why I said not to trim the tape on the rim? Are you f'ng kidding me?
    First off you're compromising your carbon rim by actually scoring it. That's like asking for a failure and as a matter of fact you should ask the rim manufacturer what they think of this idea to trim the tape on the rim. They'll tell you you just voided your warranty! LOL
    Second thing is trimming the roll is about 100 times faster and more accurate than what you're doing and if you plan correctly you may be able to use the opposite side of the cut so you waste less.
    Third if it's an aluminum rim you've just created a burr and again weakened the rim by scoring it.
    Should I go on or do you know see how idiotic your idea is?
    It's so easy to mount a utility knife blade to a block of wood with a fence to set the width of the trimmer that you'll be thinking; WTF was I thinking!
    That escalated quickly!

  71. #271
    mtbr member
    Reputation: manitou2200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,976
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    That escalated quickly!
    Escalated? It's so obvious why you would do something like that that I can't believe he actually posted what he did. Think about it!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Function in disaster, finish in style.

  72. #272
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    Not touching that with an 11 foot pole.

  73. #273
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    I saw what you did there Mack.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  74. #274
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by manitou2200 View Post
    You ask why I said not to trim the tape on the rim? Are you f'ng kidding me?
    First off you're compromising your carbon rim by actually scoring it. That's like asking for a failure and as a matter of fact you should ask the rim manufacturer what they think of this idea to trim the tape on the rim. They'll tell you you just voided your warranty! LOL
    Second thing is trimming the roll is about 100 times faster and more accurate than what you're doing and if you plan correctly you may be able to use the opposite side of the cut so you waste less.
    Third if it's an aluminum rim you've just created a burr and again weakened the rim by scoring it.
    Should I go on or do you know see how idiotic your idea is?
    It's so easy to mount a utility knife blade to a block of wood with a fence to set the width of the trimmer that you'll be thinking; WTF was I thinking!
    Do you think I am carving into my rim full force like someone etching their name in a park bench? Do you think that an carbon/aluminum bead wall is that susceptible to damage from a blade that really doesn't even hit it.? The tape overlap makes a transition in which the blade has room to penetrate without carving into your rim. You should try it before you tell people it's a bad idea. Even if i pushed the blade enough to score a razor thin line in the carbon you really think it's going compromise my rim? If carbon and aluminum were really that fragile then 777's would be falling out of the sky, we couldn't ride our bikes on dirt, and my carbon fiber quad i've crashed 20x's wouldn't be operational.

    Not only do I practice what I preach, but I even do it on some spendy wheels. Post 11 is my carbon enve's that I have taped 2 other types of tape since that post. Guess how I cut those next tapes down to size? I am a heck of a lot more worried about all the rocks, roots, trees, and other abuse my rims go through than a possible razor thin line around the inside edge of a bead wall (that doesn't exist).

    Remember I started this thread? I've cut down my share of tapes. Matter of fact, your use of tyvek tape probably came from post 1 of this thread (thank me later). One thing you are right about was me thinking "WTF was I thinking". That thought came to me once I learned how the Downhillers/Enduro/Fat bike riders cut their gorilla clear directly on the rim. I thought "wtf was I thinking trying to cut a roll of tape to size?" Cutting on the rim has been by far the most effective, best fitting, efficient way I've done it (other than buying perfect size tape which is not always an option). Apparently you can mount a utility blade to a block of wood and cut perfect in less than 10 seconds? That's seriously impressive.

    So yeah back to your question, Please go on. Your constructive contribution to this thread is appreciated.

  75. #275
    mtbr member
    Reputation: manitou2200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,976

    Tubeless Tape Thread

    This is not a pissing match and I'm not going to argue with you about your choice and recommendation to trim tape on a rim with a knife. This is not a good idea and it's bad advice to be dolling out here. Don't take my word for it, contact Enve, Reynolds, Derby, Nox and ask them about your technique trimming tape on the rim. Then post back here on the thread you started (which by the way is a very good thread, so thanks) and let us know what they say. I don't think you're going to like what they tell you but you should because it may save you some headaches down the road.
    Scuff, nicks, scratches to a carbon rim from riding is not going to cause as much of an issue as a cut in line around the rim. Sure you can crush a rim in a crash if it contacts rock to the sidewall but that'll happen to most any rim or frame for that matter regardless of material.
    Trimming the tape on the roll is faster, more efficient and more accurate. I obviously exaggerated about it being 100 times faster but I was trying to make a point. Trimming on the roll allows you to trim the whole roll quickly and once you do it you'll see what I mean. It's easy to make a guide with a fence holding an utility knife blade and clamp it to your bench, then you slide the role up to the guide and blade and spin it around cutting the tape accurately and quickly, as much or as little of the roll as you need.
    I've been 100% tubeless for almost 12 years now except on my road bike. I've run ghetto tubeless, UST, and now the TR systems, they've gotten so good now that it seems crazy to me to not to be running tubeless on your mountain bikes.
    The other issue is it's not always necessary to run the tape wall to wall as some rim manufactures don't recommend it and some tires are very tight to the bead bed as is. I also sometimes brush a thin layer of contact cement in the center well to assist the tape in adhesion. You can use solvent based contact or water are if your concerned about a reaction to to the carbon rim. This really helps the tape lay down and adhere sometimes and clean up is not an issue if you have to re-tape the rim down the road.
    You cover the tape options well in this thread but no I did not get the Tyvek idea from here. Some of the earliest ghetto tubeless I did was using a layer of nylon fiber packing tape and a layer of 3m electrical tape over the top. The electrical tape is impervious to most everything and seals perfectly but stretches too much to be used alone. The fiber tape controlled the stretch but is not as durable or has the best sealing properties.
    So yes I practice what I preach as well. I just want to help members avoid potential issues as I see them with some not so great advice. I do apologize for being a bit of a bull in a china shop here.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Function in disaster, finish in style.

  76. #276
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    124
    Has anyone ever tried shin pad hockey tape? It's super cheap and easily available everywhere here in Canada??

    Renfrew Poly Clear Shin Guard Hockey Tape

  77. #277
    mtbr member
    Reputation: manitou2200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,976
    I'm sure it works, it's a bit on the thick side but that would be good for some tire rim combos. Probably wouldn't need more than once around for most.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Function in disaster, finish in style.

  78. #278
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,136
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Not touching that with an 11 foot pole.
    Neg repped for that with the comment "you've go [sic] the problem pal!"

    Not touching that with a 12 footer either.

  79. #279
    mtbr member
    Reputation: EndoanaJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by combfilter View Post
    My Experience with the following tapes and a few questions........
    Tesa 4289
    This is the tape that people say is exactly what Stans is. You can find it dirt cheap on amazon. The only issue i've had with stans tapes and as well as the 9998 tapes is that when they sit or are in the heat long the adhesive tends to wear off. I've even got rolls from amazon that were kind of warped and you could tell the warping was from them getting hot/cold/hot/cold int he warehouse and the adhesive coming undone
    Has anyone tried TESA 4298? The company website says it doesn't leave any residue. The TESA 4289 doesn't make that claim. Just wondering

  80. #280
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    501
    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    ........A valve stem leakage resulted in not being able to ride yesterday. Pull the tire off this AM; tape I installed yesterday has already pulled over nipple holes and folded in places. :/
    Actually somewhat surprised the LBS had a roll of Stan's Tape.

    I'm unsure to why I had the valve leakage. The Stan's valve doesn't appear to be damaged in anyway. Likely will install a new valve stem when I do the Stan's Tape to rule out the valve. Reusing a Stan's Valve hasn't given myself grief before now. Do people put a dab of silicon around the valve stem before installation to prevent leakage? Other than that I may've put too large of a hole in the Gorilla Tape...
    In my experience, sealant leaking out at the valve hole does not mean theres a problem with the valve or the valve hole or the tape over the valve hole. Sealant can get into any of the spoke holes and will migrate to the only exit in the system, which is the non-rubber-gasket-end of the valve. It's less likely to leak out of the spoke holes because of the high tension pulling the nipple tightly agains the rim surface. Fluid doesn't run in a straight line, it goes all over the damn place. As this post mentioned, the tape had already started rolling over the nipple holes. There's your obvious leak.
    Knolly Chilcotin
    Knolly Warden
    Knolly Podium
    Knolly Delirium

  81. #281
    mtbr member
    Reputation: EndoanaJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by jm2e View Post
    In my experience, sealant leaking out at the valve hole does not mean theres a problem with the valve or the valve hole or the tape over the valve hole. Sealant can get into any of the spoke holes.......
    I came to the same conclusion recently after developing a leak. I replaced the valve stem and aired up the tire. After airing up I sprayed soapy water on the tire/rim and bubbles appeared at the valve stem. I put the old valve stem back in - same thing. I finally discovered a wrinkle in the tape that made a conduit to a spoke hole and I figured that was the problem.
    I re-taped the rim and all is well.

  82. #282
    *n00b*
    Reputation: ShadowGLI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by combfilter View Post
    Here dude.. Get this. It will work for you with very little cutting (maybe none at all depending on your inner rim width). check to make sure it will fit. This tape is cheap and works well. Works really well. I need to add it to the front page actually.

    https://www.amazon.com/Maxi-248-Poly.../dp/B00EP22NKY
    Thanks again for all the work you and other contributors have added to this thread.

    I just went tubeless this year on my 27.5+ bike but my wheels came pre-taped from factory. I had a hub failure the other week and the manufacturer is replacing the hub and relacing the wheel, but I have heard from others that they have sent the wheels back NOT taped, hence my search.

    I am going to give this Maxi tape a try as its one of the few that should not require cutting being that I only have a 32mm wide OD rim at this time, I figure the width should be just about right. *Fingers Crossed*.

    I'll be sure to update down the road w/ the success (or lack there of) that I encounter w/ this tape.. wish me luck and thanks again!
    Ryan - 2016 DB Mason Trail

  83. #283
    Cyclist
    Reputation: GarfieldCat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    21
    I tried Gorilla Clear Repair Tape on a non UST rim with a UST tire. it failed, twice. I just could not get it to seal. The surface of the tape is slippery and the 2nd layer slid on top of the 1st layer. It also left a residue when I took it off. Maybe some people have success with the Gorilla Clear, but I struck out twice.
    My Rides:
    MTB NightTrain Bullet Ti Fat Bike
    MTB Fly Team29 Ti
    MTB Giant XTC 26" HT
    Cross Cannondale SuperX
    Road Cervelo R5

  84. #284
    *n00b*
    Reputation: ShadowGLI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by combfilter View Post
    That's the whole point of this thread. Not to get raped for 22.00 and only be able to do 1 set of wheels with that.

    Here dude.. Get this. It will work for you with very little cutting (maybe none at all depending on your inner rim width). check to make sure it will fit. This tape is cheap and works well. Works really well. I need to add it to the front page actually.

    https://www.amazon.com/Maxi-248-Poly.../dp/B00EP22NKY
    As a follow up, I have had the 1/2" version of this tape on my rear wheel for 3 weeks now after my rear hub was fixed and it has held air perfectly so far (even with an overlap section in the middle of the rim (pic below). I'm going to order a 1" wide version to redo my wheels in the spring but so far I'm incredibly happy and this is basically VERY sticky (but resedue free) plastic tape... it has the perfect amount of stretch/tension and has a great seal.


    Last edited by ShadowGLI; 10-26-2016 at 12:36 PM.
    Ryan - 2016 DB Mason Trail

  85. #285
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,203
    ^^^ The picture no showy
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  86. #286
    Always in the wrong gear
    Reputation: ARandomBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,194
    I used 20mm Kapton tape (20mmx100ft $5-6 on eBay) on my i30 carbon wheels when I first had them built. went on easily and seems to stick well.
    Previously, with gorilla tape, Stan's tape or "fake Stan's' 3M 8898 I would have occasional leaks from the spoke holes that required the tubeless shake and dance to seal. I expected the same from kapton, but it doesn't seem to be the case. Likely more due to the rim width than anything, but regardless, kapton laid down nicely.

    I laid down 2 layers of Kapton with only just a little bit of tension and cut an X for the valve hole with a hobby razor knife.. jammed in the valve stem and aired it up.
    I really like that it's translucent and I can easily see where/if sealant has gotten under the tape.

    Kapton is definitely my tape of choice now.

  87. #287
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    +1 on Kapton. I don't cut an X though. I prefer to poke a hole in the hopes that there isn't a tear in the tape where valve base seals. I use one layer on mtb and two on road.
    Do the math.

  88. #288
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    454
    I use soldering iron to make the valve hole

  89. #289
    RAKC
    Reputation: tigris99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,127
    Kapton tape truly is the best tubeless tape option there is IMO. I've done gorilla, gorilla clear, and Stan's. Kapton has give my 0 issues where as something always went wrong with the others.

    And kapton tape comes in widths that you can do 80 and 100mm fat hoops too without issues (need a rim strip over the rim cut outs though of course).

    Kapton doesn't break down and start leaking or anything else due to sealant.

    Only thing is DONT STRETCH IT. Only just enough to make it fit snug on the rim. If you pull and stretch like you do other tapes it will tear at the nipple hole. And there is 0 reason to pull on it that hard anyway. Fits and seals perfectly.

    So far my son's 20", about to do it on his 24" fat bike that is replacing the 20", my 29er and my fat bike on mulefuts.

    Every one I've had 0 issues with. 29er has been going all season including a rear tire change, haven't touched the tape. Fat bike I set up and rode for a bit with a 3.8 tire on the rear, just switched it to a 4.7 tire, didn't touch the tape at all just switched tires and been perfect.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  90. #290
    *n00b*
    Reputation: ShadowGLI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    ^^^ The picture no showy
    Fixed but included here again

    Ryan - 2016 DB Mason Trail

  91. #291
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BareNecessities's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    104
    After reading through the thread, I've decided to give the Kapton polyimide tape a go. I've used Gorilla before and don't like the residue & sealant absorption. Tesa 4289 has also been effective, but I've found that it doesn't conform well to some rim beds.

    Would one layer of Kapton be enough for relatively low pressure mtb tyres?

  92. #292
    RAKC
    Reputation: tigris99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,127
    No use 2-3 layers. Its still far lighter than anything else.

    Also DO NOT pull tight like you do other tapes. Just pull a little bit, enough to avoid wrinkles and such. Anything more and when you cut the hole for the valve stem the tape will tear and you'll be starting over.

    I'm on an entire season on my 29er and 2 months on the my fat bike using kapton tape and first time I have had 0 tape issues.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  93. #293
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BareNecessities's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    No use 2-3 layers. Its still far lighter than anything else.

    Also DO NOT pull tight like you do other tapes. Just pull a little bit, enough to avoid wrinkles and such. Anything more and when you cut the hole for the valve stem the tape will tear and you'll be starting over.

    I'm on an entire season on my 29er and 2 months on the my fat bike using kapton tape and first time I have had 0 tape issues.
    Good to hear. I'll be careful not to stretch it tight.

    Thanks!

  94. #294
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    As mentioned earlier, I use 1 layer of Kapton on mtb and two on 100psi road tires. I do check for and remove any sharp burs on the the spoke holes in the rim bed, which I do when using Stan's tape too. It's stupidly light so use more layers if it makes you feel better. On road wheels it weighed 5gm/wheel with two layers.

    If it tears, you can put a couple of inch patch over it. I've poked holes through it to replace spokes and then patched the holes with short pieces.
    Do the math.

  95. #295
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BareNecessities's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    As mentioned earlier, I use 1 layer of Kapton on mtb and two on 100psi road tires. I do check for and remove any sharp burs on the the spoke holes in the rim bed, which I do when using Stan's tape too. It's stupidly light so use more layers if it makes you feel better. On road wheels it weighed 5gm/wheel with two layers.
    Ah yes. It was your posts that made me wonder if one wrap was enough. The spoke holes on my Easton Arc 30s seem well finished, so they should present no problems. It even looks as if Easton sell rebranded Kapton tape as part of their tubeless conversion kit.

    Easton MTB Tubeless Conversion Kit | Chain Reaction Cycles

  96. #296
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    271
    Got a pair of Mulefut 80mm rims that I have been messing around with tape on. Front is stretch wrap (gives me no problems, except when I change tires I have to redo it every time), rear was just redone with Tough Duct tape and is slowly leaking probably due to a poor tape job by me.

    Think this will work for them? 80mm polyimide tape.
    80mm 8cm x 30M Kapton Tape High Temperature Heat Resistant Polyimide | eBay

    Seems cheap for quite a bit of it. Also the Sun Ringle tape is 78mm, do you think I will need to trim the 2mm or not?

    Thanks

    P.S.

    I have also never had an issue with Stans tape. It is just pricey even if you can get deals on it.

  97. #297
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    In the fatbike tires I've set up, I've used wide Gorilla tape...which I'm not very fond of. I leave the existing rim strip on to cover the cutouts in the rim, go around one side of the rim and then use a heat gun to help form and adhere the tape to the rim bed. The I do the other side of the rim. It works OK except it's not uncommon for the adhesive to ooze out from under the tape and stick to the tire bead causing the Gorilla tape to pull up when removing the tire, which sometimes necessitates retaping. One thing about Gorilla tape is that it's pretty thick and builds up the bead seat diameter of the rim so that the tire's bead fits more tightly. Kapton wouldn't do that. I'm not sure how well Kapton would conform to the rim bed shape and cover the existing rim strip. Conceivably you could use narrower Kapton, maybe 1" wide, and go around the rim in a spiral overlapping the tape 1/2 its width. I'm not sure that's a great idea either. I always install a tube and let it sit for a while to press down and form the tape the rim bed. Anyway, give it a shot and report back with how it works and what you think.
    Do the math.

  98. #298
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    271
    Does Kapton not have a strong adhesive?

    I am not worried about setting up the bead seat to make the tires fit tighter. Have you ever tried to take a tire off a Mulefut? Nearly impossible.

  99. #299
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,426
    The adhesive is pretty thin and works well on smooth clean surfaces. It's not tacky, thick and goopy like Gorilla tape's adhesive and won't fill voids or stick to something that isn't smooth. If it doesn't lie flat and gets wrinkles, the adhesive may not fill the wrinkles and it could leak.
    Do the math.

  100. #300
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,560
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Wider tapes i have tried. It was too much hassle to cut it. With all the time I have spent experimenting with unconventional tapes I could have just bought some purpose made tape and been done with it. I build my own wheels built all of my bikes from the frame-up and service my own Forks. This is just more hassle than it's worth
    8898 is all you need.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. tubeless rim tape
    By jrafter in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 01-10-2018, 02:04 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-09-2014, 06:39 PM
  3. Tubeless tape idea.
    By Vistacruise in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 08-15-2013, 08:59 AM
  4. Tubeless & Rim Tape
    By jarango in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-13-2013, 11:34 PM
  5. Stans Tape. Tubeless tape. Info needed.
    By MasterOMayhem in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-01-2012, 12:55 PM

Members who have read this thread: 479

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.