Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 200 of 452
  1. #151
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rmasse10's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    171
    Ive kept mine at about 28 front and about 26 back....that seems to work fairly well for me right now. I run tubes and still no issues...but I have tried a gamut of pressures and noticed the higher pressures (at least for me and my trails) tended to slow me down...alot, and backing them off gave me more speed and maneuverability....so my recommendation is to try some variations out for yourself and see what you like
    Customize your Gear...Performance Moisture Wicking Apparel
    Custom Performance Apparel

  2. #152
    Obsessed Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    15

    Psi

    I just got back from a 3 hour ride. Conditions were stilla bit muddy with tons of damp rocks a wet roots....i run 35 psi in front on geax Saguaro 2.0 and 35 rear michelin gravel country 1.95....the runs were a bit slippery but still ok

  3. #153
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    16
    i run 52psi on 2.2's and i am 175 on short travel fully

  4. #154
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    167
    45 psi... or I will start to flat too much. 210 lbs

  5. #155
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ofroad'bent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    1,261

    Schwalbe RR+ Stan's- Pressure Q for mixed riding

    After reading this thread, I switched out my tires for Schwalbe Racing Ralph 2.25 SS rear and 2.1 front, with Stan's on the rims. First time going tubeless.

    I'm looking for tire pressure suggestions for overnight adventure racing with these.
    We'll hit dirt roads, ATV trails with deep muck-holes, rocky Canadian Shield, unrideable swamps and decent doubletrack. Probably no twisty purpose-built singletrack.

    I'm a light guy at 150lbs but my bike's got a lot of rear weight bias, and I'm carrying a lot of gear, much on a rear rack (Long story). I've raced this way for years, with 40PSI in a Hutch Python 2.25 on the rear and a Bonty Revolt-X 2.0 on the front with 30PS!.

    I'd appreciate pressure suggestions for the new tubeless setup. I know harder tires would be better for the dirt roads, but I'd lose more time if I can't make it over the nasty bits or if I get flats.

    Thanks in advance.

  6. #156
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    710
    Quote Originally Posted by Wanny View Post
    45 psi... or I will start to flat too much. 210 lbs
    weird, im 220~ geared up and I run 33-35 front and rear and haven't pinched flatted yet, when I was at 29 and 30 I did all the time.

  7. #157
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17
    I need two more posts so I can start a new thread in "Wheels and Tires", thats where this belongs.

    Ever mount your tubeless tires and get a bit of a wobble because the tire is not perfectly aligned on the rim?

    How important is it for the tire to roll true?

    I had a small wobble once on the rear tire but not bad and it held air just fine. I had a bike shop mount my last pair of tires when I purchsed new tires. One tire wobbled noticeably and hasn't held air very well. I will remount it but I was wondering if there are some tips for getting the tires true to the rims when mounting tubeless tires. BTW- Using Stans sealant, works great otherwise. ALSO, IT'S A SIDE TO SIDE WOBBLE.
    The bike is a 2008 stumpy w/ Specialized Captain tires. Rims are Specialized brand and are true.

  8. #158
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    17
    Second post. Yea!

  9. #159
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrozCountry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,106
    Quote Originally Posted by gvs_nz View Post
    Here's some info for you to give you confidence to try a larger volume fast rolling tire at low pressure. Many have switched over and like it. Like plenty before you,it pays to read all of a thread not just the last posts.

    http://www.schwalbe.co.uk/pdf/techinfo.pdf pages 14 to 16
    Outstanding paper. For the lazy, here is a quick summary:
    Quote Originally Posted by Schwalbe
    Off-road rolling resistance decreases significantly with increased tyre width. For instance on grass the wide mountain bike tyres required 15.41 W less rolling resistance power than their narrower equivalents.
    Quote Originally Posted by Schwalbe
    Off-road a reduction of tyre pressure reduces rolling resistance. In a meadow for instance going back from 4.0 to 1.5 bar (57 to 21 psi) can save remarkable 18 Watts of power.
    Quote Originally Posted by Schwalbe
    FIRMLY inflated narrow tyres are history. 'Fat' and less air speed things up!
    On the road it's the opposite.

    As for me, as low as the tire does not squirm. I can't get myself to slam the wheels into rocks to see how low you can go without a flat.

  10. #160
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,639

    My pinch-flat-free streak is over.

    Quote Originally Posted by trailville View Post
    To be honest, I've never had issues with pinch flatting. I think part of it is due to the the mainly rounded rocks we have around here (thanks glaciers), and part is due to the fact that I started mtn biking on rigid bikes and even though I run suspension now (front and full), I still unweight the bike as I go over and through stuff.
    Well, I can't say this anymore. After 2 decades of riding without ever getting a pinch flat and having run pretty low psi for at least the last 5 or so years, it finally happened. I was heading out for a quick trail ride on my rigid SS this afternoon, and though I normally put 24-25 in a rear 2.1 tire, my gauge read 23.5 and I thought "that's fine". Well, immediately after hitting a crude rock bridge (basically a line of larger rocks across a shallow creak), I heard the air whoosh out and knew my luck had finally run out. To make things worse, since this was just intended to be a quick ride, I didn't bring a spare inner tube as I normally do, and, of course, my unopened tube of rubber cement in my patch kit was empty when I perfed the top (I've had that happen before with old patch kits). So I got to walk.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  11. #161
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    437
    I have 2.2 mountain kings and when running28-30psi pinch flat almost every trail ride. my weight is 180. I started running 35psi and no pinch flats. So tailer the psi to trail and you.

  12. #162
    The Cheater
    Reputation: Veda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    551
    If there is such a thing as an exact science to tire pressure for offroad bike riding then we wouldn't be having these threads all over the net. I read somewhere that the proper pressure should be when the sag is 15%, then what about those tires that use softer compounds? Would the 40% front 60% rear times your body weight formula work in all applications? Is it faster to have a wide tire with low knobs ran at low press rather than the usual narrow high press? Are you really faster overall by having a tire that's fast and slippery rather than a heavier one that grips?

    There's no right and wrong. It all depends on the particular trail you're riding, your riding style, and your body weight. I too had spent too much on tires experimenting different types. Sometimes sold them after 1 ride. Unlike in US, all of my tracks involve all kinds of conditions including mud. Now I just ran Nobby Nic Pace Stars 2.1 which has the awesome grip due to soft knobs yet lighter than anything else in the market. I just play with the PSI for the different conditions. Sure soft compounds wouldn't last that long and will cost more $ in the long run but I get both safety, comfort and speed in all conditions.
    Titux X Carbon 2010 race 9.93kg
    Titux X 2009 "Deore 2012" training 11.55kg

  13. #163
    The Cheater
    Reputation: Veda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    551
    Quote Originally Posted by mr.niles View Post
    just fyi....i was involved in this thread a while ago. after plenty of riding various tire pressures on maxxis high roller 2.5 dh casing tires, i'm at 27 front and 35 rear on my dh bike. any lower and i flat.
    Your point being that because of lower pressure you're slower not due to higher rolling resistance or difficulty pedaling but because of flats. But that should be out of the question if you're running tubeless which also means you can run even lower pressure. Go tubeless bro!
    Titux X Carbon 2010 race 9.93kg
    Titux X 2009 "Deore 2012" training 11.55kg

  14. #164
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    180
    Interesting thread guys ... I have always run high pressures in my tire 'cause I'm a big guy who doesn't like to repair flats. I'm 105kg (231 lbs) and running a 2.5 Weirwolf up front and a 2.4 Motoraptor on the real of my old '95 Avalanche. I had 45 psi in them yesterday and I notice they were a little bouncy so I'll drop 'em to 35 psi and take my friends Mr tire pump and Mr accurate pressure gauge on my next ride.
    An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit. Pliny the Younger (62 AD - 114 AD)

    Brian

  15. #165
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrozCountry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,106
    Quote Originally Posted by the old fool View Post
    Interesting thread guys ... I have always run high pressures in my tire 'cause I'm a big guy who doesn't like to repair flats. I'm 105kg (231 lbs) and running a 2.5 Weirwolf up front and a 2.4 Motoraptor on the real of my old '95 Avalanche. I had 45 psi in them yesterday and I notice they were a little bouncy so I'll drop 'em to 35 psi and take my friends Mr tire pump and Mr accurate pressure gauge on my next ride.
    You do get more flats in low pressure, but you don't get flats running tubeless

  16. #166
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    180
    Well if i have to go tubeless I might just have to get a new bike !
    An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit. Pliny the Younger (62 AD - 114 AD)

    Brian

  17. #167
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,639
    Quote Originally Posted by the old fool View Post
    Interesting thread guys ... I have always run high pressures in my tire 'cause I'm a big guy who doesn't like to repair flats. I'm 105kg (231 lbs) and running a 2.5 Weirwolf up front and a 2.4 Motoraptor on the real of my old '95 Avalanche. I had 45 psi in them yesterday and I notice they were a little bouncy so I'll drop 'em to 35 psi and take my friends Mr tire pump and Mr accurate pressure gauge on my next ride.
    Wow, I'm surprised a 2.4 Moto would even fit on the back of a '95 Avalanche.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  18. #168
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrozCountry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,106
    Quote Originally Posted by the old fool View Post
    Well if i have to go tubeless I might just have to get a new bike !
    It's not that bad. Stan's conversion kit works, its much cheaper than a new bike.

  19. #169
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    180

    low pressure is better

    I will have a look at Stan's thanks

    I found 35 psi had an amazing effect on my ride, the bike rolled well stuck to the ground better and my hands didn't get such a beating

    So I dropped the pressure to 30 psi and it's even better ...

    Thanks for the advice
    An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit. Pliny the Younger (62 AD - 114 AD)

    Brian

  20. #170
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    247
    Quote Originally Posted by Veda View Post
    Your point being that because of lower pressure you're slower not due to higher rolling resistance or difficulty pedaling but because of flats. But that should be out of the question if you're running tubeless which also means you can run even lower pressure. Go tubeless bro!
    yes, doing tubeless this dh season. works very good, but can't lower the pressures much without hitting the rim - there's al;ways that one damn rock that's the perfect shape in the place where you really want to ride to bonk your rim on.

  21. #171
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by mr.niles View Post
    yes, doing tubeless this dh season. works very good, but can't lower the pressures much without hitting the rim - there's al;ways that one damn rock that's the perfect shape in the place where you really want to ride to bonk your rim on.
    Yep. I run 32/34 on my 2bliss spec purgatory 2.4/2.2 tires. Always felt great, never had any flats. Until this weekend riding at Snowshoe; miss-timed a rock step-up and BAM had a rather explosive burp of the rear along with a heavy hit to the rim, shredding the rear tire.

    Don't know what I could have done differently...other than having a wider wheelset to run DH tires, or a different bike, or being a better rider and not bashing into stuff. It's not like I was running super low pressure.

  22. #172
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by mr.niles View Post
    yes, doing tubeless this dh season. works very good, but can't lower the pressures much without hitting the rim - there's al;ways that one damn rock that's the perfect shape in the place where you really want to ride to bonk your rim on.
    And because I'm thinking about getting a different set of tires for lift riding after this weekend, I'm curious as to what you went with. Rim width? tires? UST rims and tires? or conversion? and what pressure?

  23. #173
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    You do get more flats in low pressure, but you don't get flats running tubeless
    Sometimes you get fewer flats because you have more control and can avoid the big pointy bits rather than sliding/bouncing into them.

    And tubeless does not guaranty you will not flat.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  24. #174
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3,489
    Quote Originally Posted by CrozCountry View Post
    Outstanding paper. For the lazy, here is a quick summary:



    On the road it's the opposite.

    As for me, as low as the tire does not squirm. I can't get myself to slam the wheels into rocks to see how low you can go without a flat.
    Just note that they were testing wide tires at low pressure. If you run narrow tires at low pressure you may find they feel slower. Rolling resistance relates to the distortion of the casing. A narrower tire probably distorts excessively at low pressure negating any benefit from running at low pressure.

  25. #175
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    82
    40 front + rear on my Rockhopper 29 exp.

  26. #176
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbg33k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by ricky916 View Post
    weird, im 220~ geared up and I run 33-35 front and rear and haven't pinched flatted yet, when I was at 29 and 30 I did all the time.
    I had a talk with a buddy on the trail over the weekend and I told him I always have been at like 45 just out of the fear of pinching and the thought that it would make it roll faster on the climbing. I'm ok with the tire supposedly bouncing off of stuff because at 225 (not counting the gear) My suspension is eating up that bounce. LOL I was curious to see if other riders over 200 do the same. I had another friend on a ride a few weeks ago tell me about that study where the tire rolled better at lower pressures. Now after seeing it again I think I'm going to start lowering my pressure to see what happens. Thanks!

  27. #177
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    155
    I always thought it was the riders choice only if it's within the tyres guidelines not to low not too high! that's what i did anyway.

  28. #178
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Delirious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    132
    I'm using 20-25 psi on my 2.25 Rocket Ron's on a 29er. I probably weigh 140 lbs with my gear.

  29. #179
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 0010 0110's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    51
    im 230 lbs i run 36 in the front and 40~42 in the rear

  30. #180
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    24
    Just want to know should I run tubeless? What are the pros when riding tubeless?

  31. #181
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    21
    I'm glad I decided to check out this topic. I've always ran 32psi just because that was what someone had mentioned to me when I asked. I'm going to start playing around with it more to see how the ride is effected.
    Thanks!

  32. #182
    Hazardous to your health!
    Reputation: hazardousmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    472
    i run 30f/35r and i weigh 195lbs

    all terrains in my area
    2011 Specialized Rockhopper: Captain Tires, Disc Brakes, 24 speed

    Upgrades:
    Shimano Clipless pedals
    x9 Rear Derailleur

  33. #183
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,453
    Quote Originally Posted by Frogfuel7 View Post
    Just want to know should I run tubeless? What are the pros when riding tubeless?
    There are plenty of other threads discussing that, this one is about pressure.

  34. #184
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrozCountry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,106
    I overdid it. I had a front tire roll off the rim this weekend after a landing from a tiny jump with the front not completely straight. Just got a digital pressure gauge, and checked how much pressure I had (eyeball the front with fingers, close enough). 10-11PSI in the front, 15 in the rear. Not kidding. No more 15 PSI for me. I will miss the traction, but not miss the tire rolling off

    The tire pressure gauge is my new riding buddy.

  35. #185
    New MTB XC Racer
    Reputation: Rum Runner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    253
    Pulled the trigger on some tubeless near the end of the summer. Did a couple training rides and a few laps of a 24 hr solo attempt when rear suspension broke and we didn't have tools to extract a broken part.
    I was running around 23 psi front and 25 psi rear on 2.2 Mountain Kings. Tires worked great. Was almost perfect conditions so roots and rocks were pretty dry. Traction was great and tires felt like they rolled really well.
    I couldn't seal them up without sealant but I only put 1/3 scoop of Stans and still holding air after 3 months.
    I was using similar pressures in my tubed 2,1 Nevs and about 5 psi more in tubed Karmas on my very rough/rocky local course(Camp Fortune QC). Got a lot of flats this year when racing but while out trail riding only one flat as our focus is more on lower speed technical climbs and descents.
    Will update in the spring when I get a chance to do more MTB'ing. Currently in Cyclocross race mode and using road bike on the rollers.
    For fun I am runnining about 32-34 psi on Scwalbe CX Pro 700x30C with tubes and no flats two seasons

    Cheers,
    Paul

  36. #186
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    156
    I don't know how much air I let out when I get to the trail head, whatever feels right. I started to check it when I got home. Found out 18-22 front and 24-27 rear was pretty typical. Much less than the old 1.95x26" pressures.
    Fully rigid. 2.35x29 WTB tires with tubes, Velocity Blunts. 175lbs + weight of bike.
    Every once in while I will feel the front tire bottom on the rim. No pinch flats on front yet. Have had a couple on rear long after the ride has ended.
    Trail is hardpack with river rock. Lots of sharp broken shale rock with a few roots.

  37. #187
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    19
    Start with something like 37psi front and 40 rear.
    If you don´t get a punkture let 2psi out next time, after a fiew rides of litting air out you will fint your soft spot...

    My main advice is to ride with 2-4psi less in the front wheel.

    Cheers,
    Helgi Berg.

  38. #188
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    53
    Im 130lbs and running Ritchey Z-max Evolutions 1.9 in the rear at 23psi and 2.1 in the front at 20psi. Running tubeless with Stans ZTR olympic rims.

  39. #189
    Texan
    Reputation: Gary H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,366
    I'm 198 pounds, ride mostly hardpack. Current tires are Karmas and I run 40 up front, and 45 in the rear. I'm a 53 year old trail rider and in no hurry. If your like me, don't worry about getting exactly 16.3 psi or whatever in your tires. Tire pressure is WAY over rated for the casual rider.

  40. #190
    Cormac
    Reputation: cormy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    128
    I run 26 psi with tubeless and I'm 150lbs.
    '11 Dawes Deadeye
    '12 Niner E.M.D. 9
    '09 Giant ocr c1
    Xtracycle

  41. #191
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    10
    60psi atras y 55 adelante

  42. #192
    Poqitas
    Guest

    Mtb pressure calculator

    It seems to be a nice pressure calculator: mtb.ubiqyou.com

  43. #193
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    2,639
    Quote Originally Posted by Poqitas View Post
    It seems to be a nice pressure calculator: mtb.ubiqyou.com
    No thanks. Getting riding tips from magazine articles is how I ended up running too much pressure for far too many years. It all sounds good when you're a noob, but once you start to actually know something about mountain biking, you quickly figure out the guys that write for those magazines don't know squat.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  44. #194
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joel RW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    310
    171 pound rider, shimano xt UST rims, maxxis ardent exC/UST/LUST 26x2.25 tires on both ends, 20 psi front 22 psi rear. Any lower for me and I can feel a loss in performance. running tubeless.

  45. #195
    Poqitas
    Guest

    ...

    ...

  46. #196
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chantheman84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    175
    I had mine at 15psi before , me and my bike weighs 175lbs combine , but 25 psi seems to be the winning pressure for me on Geax mezcal 2.1 w/tubes, now i just went tubeless couple days ago w/ the same tires, so I'll probably have to go up on pressure a little.

  47. #197
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CrozCountry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,106
    My problem with going around 15PSI was tire rolling off the rim. I am in mid twenties now. The difference for the Nevegal is that I have to lean the bike more into the turn to get the side knobs to bite, not a biggy.

  48. #198
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8
    I'm surprised at some of the high pressures people are running(40+ psi) for trail riding. I'm fairly new to the sport, but usually go about 35psi rear 33psi front on my hardtail and I've never had a pinch flat(knock on wood). I'd go a little lower in pressure but I am nervous of pinch flatting. I'm 205lbs and currently use 2.1" Weirwolf race tires.

  49. #199
    bay area CA
    Reputation: LONO100's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    197
    wow, so much discussion on tire pressure. being mostly a BMXER my whole life, ive always prefered to have my tires high pressured. i understand the benefits of aring down, i do a lot of 4-wheeling and airing down is key, but personally i hate any type of rolling resistance when im on my bike and i hate repairing flats. i get the increased traction of aired down tires and its benefits though. i did the shafter grade in bolinas twice this summer, and the second time i aired down the rear tire a bit to keep that back wheel biting up that crazy incline, but generally i like my tires to be right at 45-50 on my hardtail. call me crazy but im handling business out on the trail, so i guess it comes down to each rider experimenting and finding whats feels right for the type of rider they are.

  50. #200
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    49
    Since buying a AM bike with 160mm suspension I have really been pushing the speed when going downhill to limits never reached before (to my experience at least) and therefore having a good tyre set up has become more important than ever for me as loosing grip at speed has already proven to be very painful.

    Traditionally, when riding my XC racer, I always had my tyres at 42psi because that is what Ned Overend said in his book he used for racing to avoid pinch flats, and as a big fan I followed the advice (yes, I am that old) totally ignoring any variations in between me and him (all geared up I weight 225lbs). Which wasn't a bad thing as 42psi for my weight is far softer than for his.

    When I experimented with tubeless a couple of years ago I found out for the first time the benefits of lower pressure. It was great the amount of grip I was getting from 28psi in comparison to 42 without feeling increase on rolling resistance. I felt safer and faster.

    At the moment I am using Contis Baron 2.3 with tubes at 30psi front and 35psi rear. I am getting an amazing performance on wet rocky ground and am yet to get a pinch flat.

Page 4 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •