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  1. #1
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    thinking about going tubeless

    I've been getting a lot of flats lately from goathead thorns in Denver and I'm thinking about going tubeless. I'm currently running a set of WTB Trail Boss 29ers and I really like them. I think they can be run tubeless. Would this setup involve using rimstrips and Stan's? What exactly is involved with this setup?

    I ran tubeless on my previous bike 5+ years ago and the tubes would always be flat the day after a ride. I think tubeless tends to lose more air than tubed tires but what would you consider typical in 2017 for a quality tire which has been properly configured? -5psi per week? -10 psi per week?

  2. #2
    Nat
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    With Maxxis tubeless-ready tires, carbon rims made to be run tubeless, and Orange Seal Endurance I lose less than 5psi per week.

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    Depends on the tire and sealant. On my Schwalbes Snakeskins, Iíd lose about 1 PSI every 2-3 days but it tends to settle around 18 PSI and loses less over time. On my Maxxis DDs, it loses less than 1 PSI every few days. It also tends to settle around 18 PSI.

    Losing air while being stored is no big deal. You should be setting pressures every time you ride anyway.

    Be liberal with sealant. I use 4-5 ounces per tire and itíll last for months.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

  4. #4
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    I've been tubeless on all my bikes for 6 or 7 years and can count on 1 hand the number of flats I've had. Topping up the pressures before a ride is a small price to pay for the peace of mind. I still carry a tube with me just in case but couldn't tell you the last time I needed to use it on a ride.
    No moss...

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    I have a Bontrager tire and Schwalbe tire. The Bontrager barely loses air, I have to top it up a few psi every 2-3 weeks, and its had major torn punctures. I have to add a few PSI to the Schwalbe about once a week. A non-tubeless tire will need to be topped off every couple of days.

    Ive never had a mountain bike tube hold air, every ride I had to top it off. The tubes in my Cyclocross hold air almost perfectly though.

    You just need Gorilla tape, tubeless valves, and Stan's sealant, the total cost is way overblown compared to how much money you save in buying tubes all the time. A bottle of Stan's should last 1-2 years.

  6. #6
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    What rim do you have? That will affect what you need to do. Check out Youtube for one of the hundreds of videos on how to do it.

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    Carbon hookless rims taped with 3M 8898 strapping tape. I've used lots of different tires. I use typically about 3-4oz of sealant in each, because I live with lots of cactus and thorns.

    my current setup (29x3.0) wheels had lost 1psi (down to 9psi from 10) after sitting for almost 2 weeks in my guest room/office.

    Tires these days don't weep nearly as much as they did years ago because tubeless is pretty much "the standard" these days and riders won't put up with leaking. I wouldn't. I'd find another brand. Neither my MAXXIS' or Vittoria lose any pressure between rides. I have to air up mostly due to elevation and temp, not leaking.
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  8. #8
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    thinking about going tubeless

    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    Would this setup involve using rimstrips and Stan's? What exactly is involved with this setup?
    AFAIK, rim strips are only required if your rims are not tubeless ready or UST. If they are, you would only require tubeless rim tapes.


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    I went tubeless myself on a set of Maxxis, and love them. Got a bunch of thorns on my last ride and pulled out the stem core, shot in a bottle of Stan's, aired it up a bit and back on the trail within minutes. While I don't really feel any different in the weight department, I do feel more confident in going all out and not worrying about getting a flat... for the most part.

  10. #10
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    "Thinking about tubeless" in 2017 is like "I'm thinking about replacing my tape deck with a CD player".

    I'm just as surprised when I see someone running tubes as I am when I see a cassette.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    "Thinking about tubeless" in 2017 is like "I'm thinking about replacing my tape deck with a CD player".

    I'm just as surprised when I see someone running tubes as I am when I see a cassette.
    I think that's a bad comparison. In reality, more bicycles probably use tubes than not.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrFreelancer View Post
    I think that's a bad comparison. In reality, more bicycles probably use tubes than not.
    Not in my area. I mean it, I am legitimately surprised when I find someone using tubes. Not counting Wal-Mart bikes on fireroads. Those people are also driving 1985 Honda's with tape decks.

    Maybe it's area dependent, but nobody in my area runs tubes.

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    One of the best things I ever did! Area I ride is riddled with thorn bushes to the point when I started I would have two tubes in my pack and another 2 in the truck. This past year rode half the season with out the emergency tube even with me, still like to have one just in case but what a difference maker!

  14. #14
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    It's was a good thing this thread was moved from the General Discussion forum. I wouldn't know where to look for a tubeless debate otherwise.
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    I put a set of Maxxis TR on my non tubeless Marlin 5 rims which aren't tubeless ready. Gorilla tape, valves and trucker Co sealant. Works a charm. Hold air great and the thorn holes seal up real quick. 1st time I've tried tubeless and will never look back.

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    well I just had the bike shop put stans in my tubes. this should be just as durable and hold air as well as going tubeless right? however, after reading the post about a tape deck in a 1985 honda I'm definitely leaning towards going tubeless in the near future. I don't want to be "that guy" running tubes!

  17. #17
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    They put Stanís INSIDE your tubes??

    Do yourself a favor and skip Satanís altogether, along with tubes, and use Orange a Seal. Youíll be happy with life.

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    Whoops, LOL. Autocorrected Stans apparently. I canít argue too much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by COMTBR View Post
    They put Stanís INSIDE your tubes??

    Do yourself a favor and skip Satanís altogether, along with tubes, and use Orange a Seal. Youíll be happy with life.
    Who are you referring to? Since I'm so far the only one that directly mentioned "Stan's", perhaps me? No, no tubes for me. Boobless..... I mean tubeless. Damn auto-correct

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    Oh, second person to mention Stans

  21. #21
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    Iíve had so much better luck with Orange Seal vs Stans sealant.

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    ok cool sounds like there are a lot of stans haters here giving thumbs up for orange seal. I'll get some orange seal endurance.

    what about rim tape? is gorilla tape the popular choice these days? looks like they make several different styles. I'm guessing that black double-sided tape is generally what's used for a tubeless setup.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    ok cool sounds like there are a lot of stans haters here giving thumbs up for orange seal. I'll get some orange seal endurance.

    what about rim tape? is gorilla tape the popular choice these days? looks like they make several different styles. I'm guessing that black double-sided tape is generally what's used for a tubeless setup.
    I don't know, all I saw were two dudes going back and forth. Which really doesn't constitute "a lot of Stans haters", no?
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    I don't know, all I saw were two dudes going back and forth. Which really doesn't constitute "a lot of Stans haters", no?
    all these guys seem to prefer orange seal as well:

    https://m.pinkbike.com/forum/listcom...hreadid=175541

    and also these guys:

    Switching from Stans to Orange Seal

  25. #25
    Nat
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    Okay, downsides to going tubeless include not being able to switch tires quickly. With tubes I can switch to a different tire in under five minutes for both front and rear. With tubeless I need a few hours and a big dose of motivation to engage in the task. If that bead doesnít snap onto the rim with the first blast from the compressor then I know Iím going to have to clear my schedule.

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    thinking about going tubeless

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Okay, downsides to going tubeless include not being able to switch tires quickly. With tubes I can switch to a different tire in under five minutes for both front and rear. With tubeless I need a few hours and a big dose of motivation to engage in the task. If that bead doesnít snap onto the rim with the first blast from the compressor then I know Iím going to have to clear my schedule.
    Hours? It takes me ten minutes to change out tubeless tires. The only difference is that tubeless is a bit messier. Every single tubeless ready tire Iíve ever fitted on a tubeless ready rim has had the bead set with my shitty floor pump on the first try or second try. The hardest and messiest part is moving the sealant from the old one to the new one. It definitely shouldnít take Ďhoursí to fit a tubeless tire.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    Hours? It takes me ten minutes to change out tubeless tires. The only difference is that tubeless is a bit messier. Every single tubeless ready tire Iíve ever fitted on a tubeless ready rim has had the bead set with my shitty floor pump on the first try or second try. The hardest and messiest part is moving the sealant from the old one to the new one. It definitely shouldnít take Ďhoursí to fit a tubeless tire.
    Yeah, takes me about 15 minutes.

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    Just swapped a front out about a week ago and it was a 15-20m job, including washing the removed tire and all cleanup.

  29. #29
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    Stans vs Orange Seal... Just one thing don't mix them... It will (or used to coagulate) if you did

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    all these guys seem to prefer orange seal as well:

    https://m.pinkbike.com/forum/listcom...hreadid=175541

    and also these guys:

    Switching from Stans to Orange Seal
    Oh, how do the kids say it these days? Oh yeah "my bad". Never understood that. For the longest time I thought it was "my bag". LOL which made more sense to me.

    Back on topic now:
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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    ok cool sounds like there are a lot of stans haters here giving thumbs up for orange seal. I'll get some orange seal endurance.

    what about rim tape? is gorilla tape the popular choice these days? looks like they make several different styles. I'm guessing that black double-sided tape is generally what's used for a tubeless setup.
    the normal $3 1"x30ft tape that looks like black duct tape

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    I've never really thought much about how much pressure I lose per week tubeless vs tubed. Mostly because checking / adjusting my pressure for the particular ride I have planned is all part of pre-flight checklist for most rides.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    Hours? It takes me ten minutes to change out tubeless tires. The only difference is that tubeless is a bit messier. Every single tubeless ready tire Iíve ever fitted on a tubeless ready rim has had the bead set with my shitty floor pump on the first try or second try. The hardest and messiest part is moving the sealant from the old one to the new one. It definitely shouldnít take Ďhoursí to fit a tubeless tire.
    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Yeah, takes me about 15 minutes.
    Quote Originally Posted by COMTBR View Post
    Just swapped a front out about a week ago and it was a 15-20m job, including washing the removed tire and all cleanup.
    Screw you guys!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Screw you guys!
    No, really. It shouldn't take that long unless it's your first attempt. That and compressors are not really required, a track pump will do.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    With Maxxis tubeless-ready tires, carbon rims made to be run tubeless, and Orange Seal Endurance I lose less than 5psi per week.
    Yeah. This. When the tires get old and the sidewalls are very scuffed, a bit more.

    I used to lose more with tubes. And had the surprise total flat 24-48 hours after a ride from a microscopic thorn a few times a year.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow4eva View Post
    No, really. It shouldn't take that long unless it's your first attempt. That and compressors are not really required, a track pump will do.
    Please add yourself to the "screw you" list! You guys know I'm joking out of jealousy, right?

    I know it shouldn't take that long but it does and that's why I'm always baffled by/am envious of all you guys that say they can do it first try with a hand pump when I've never been able to.

    If the beads don't pop in place on first shot then I know I'm in for some colorful language. I insert a tube to seat the beads then let it sit for a few hours to make the tire hold its shape, then unseat one side from the rim to remove the tube. Then I remove the valve core and inflate with the compressor (never been able to do it with any pump) and if the beads snap into place I'll fill with sealant. It often takes several attempts, where I'll take breaks to let my compressor refill. Then there's the puddles of sealant goo all over the garage, LOL...

    The last time I got a new tire I took it to the LBS and had them blow the tire on with their compressor, using their own choice of vocabulary. My technique needs work, ha.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Please add yourself to the "screw you" list! You guys know I'm joking out of jealousy, right?

    I know it shouldn't take that long but it does and that's why I'm always baffled by/am envious of all you guys that say they can do it first try with a hand pump when I've never been able to.

    If the beads don't pop in place on first shot then I know I'm in for some colorful language. I insert a tube to seat the beads then let it sit for a few hours to make the tire hold its shape, then unseat one side from the rim to remove the tube. Then I remove the valve core and inflate with the compressor (never been able to do it with any pump) and if the beads snap into place I'll fill with sealant. It often takes several attempts, where I'll take breaks to let my compressor refill. Then there's the puddles of sealant goo all over the garage, LOL...

    The last time I got a new tire I took it to the LBS and had them blow the tire on with their compressor, using their own choice of vocabulary. My technique needs work, ha.
    Sucks to be you then! Lol.
    On a serious note though, my method of installing a tubeless tire is as follows:
    Insert 1 side of tire to rim
    Add sealant to tire
    Carefully insert other side of tire to rim
    Start pumping tire

    And I've only done it like 2-3 times actually.
    The only time I failed was the first, and that was due to rim tape that needed replacement.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Please add yourself to the "screw you" list! You guys know I'm joking out of jealousy, right?
    I haven't had a whole lot of practice but it's gone real easy every time (sorry). What kind of rims & tires are you using? When I was shopping I picked wtb rims mostly because of good reviews claiming easy tubeless mounting.

    One thing I learned is to install the tire and set the bead before putting sealant in, no mess!
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I haven't had a whole lot of practice but it's gone real easy every time (sorry). What kind of rims & tires are you using? When I was shopping I picked wtb rims mostly because of good reviews claiming easy tubeless mounting.

    One thing I learned is to install the tire and set the bead before putting sealant in, no mess!
    Wow, your method seems to be the most efficient! But it requires the valve core remover and sealant injector, right?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow4eva View Post
    Wow, your method seems to be the most efficient! But it requires the valve core remover and sealant injector, right?
    Yes, valve core remover, which is usually my fingers or a pair of pliers if it's too tight. No sealant injector, I just use the little 1/4" tube that comes with it.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    "Thinking about tubeless" in 2017 is like "I'm thinking about replacing my tape deck with a CD player".

    I'm just as surprised when I see someone running tubes as I am when I see a cassette.
    But I have a ton of money tied up in my 8 track tapes.

    I have been tubeless since 2004. It was a rocky road at first. Lots of sidewall failures and what-nots. But I stuck with it. It took the tire manufactures a little while to catch up. The only time I have had a flat in the past ten years that I could not ride out on was when the tire was destroyed and usually some major rim damage. And then probably only 4 or 5 times in the 10 years.
    I check my pressures before almost every ride. I usually lose between 1-5 psi over a few days. Sometime I lose nothing at all. But adding a little pressure once in a while beats the hell out of buying and installing tubes hands down. Just make it a habit to check before you ride.
    Just do it!!
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I haven't had a whole lot of practice but it's gone real easy every time (sorry). What kind of rims & tires are you using? When I was shopping I picked wtb rims mostly because of good reviews claiming easy tubeless mounting.

    One thing I learned is to install the tire and set the bead before putting sealant in, no mess!
    Dammit! Nuts to you too!

    I've had Stan's rims, SRAM Roam 30 rims, SRAM Roam 40 rims, and now NOBL rims. I've used Bontrager XR tires and Maxxis tires. If I use an old tire that's already been mounted then it's more likely to seat on the first attempt but if it's a new tire you know how they have that slight kink where they've been folded in the packaging? It feels as if that kink affects how well that bead presses up against the rim so I end up needing to inflate a tube within for a few hours to get the bead to flatten out.

    I picture trying to swap tubeless tires on a bike trip at the campsite or in the hotel room -- not! Even though it's easy for apparently everyone else on the planet it still takes more time and effort (even if minimal) than tubes , which takes me back to my original point about downsides of tubeless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    ok cool sounds like there are a lot of stans haters here giving thumbs up for orange seal. I'll get some orange seal endurance.

    what about rim tape? is gorilla tape the popular choice these days? looks like they make several different styles. I'm guessing that black double-sided tape is generally what's used for a tubeless setup.
    Yeah, I went with OS Endurance also..supposedly you don't get that glob monster in the wheel. I went with Gorilla tape on mine, it's super tacky and seems to adhere really well..I had a big roll laying around the house..but GT does seem like a quality tape.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by taprackbang View Post
    Yeah, I went with OS Endurance also..supposedly you don't get that glob monster in the wheel. I went with Gorilla tape on mine, it's super tacky and seems to adhere really well..I had a big roll laying around the house..but GT does seem like a quality tape.
    I didn't think OS was supposed to form that booger either but the tire I recently removed has one. It was a surprise to me. I'll post a pic later.

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    OS doesn't booger for me, but it does make a full elastic coating inside the tire that's a bit of a pain to peel off. When someone comes up with something that works and never dries out they'll make a billion bucks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    Hours? It takes me ten minutes to change out tubeless tires. The only difference is that tubeless is a bit messier. Every single tubeless ready tire Iíve ever fitted on a tubeless ready rim has had the bead set with my shitty floor pump on the first try or second try. The hardest and messiest part is moving the sealant from the old one to the new one. It definitely shouldnít take Ďhoursí to fit a tubeless tire.
    The first time, applying rim tape, mounting valves, figuring out how to mount 1 bead, pour the juice in, then mount the other bead while spilling said juice, refill & remount, try to seal the rim with floor pump while spilling juice again, go buy more juice & a compressor (had planned on getting one anyway). Then start over. Yeah, it took hours that first time. Much less every time since.

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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by titus View Post
    all these guys seem to prefer orange seal as well:

    https://m.pinkbike.com/forum/listcom...hreadid=175541

    and also these guys:

    Switching from Stans to Orange Seal
    MBA did a sealant shootout a few months ago. Pretty thorough comparison of 8 different brands. Kind of cuts through all the crap opinions. Stans is a local company & sponsors a lot of stuff in our area. I've gotten a lot of freebies over the years & see no compelling reason to switch. Most recently got a free bottle of Stans sealant at Dirt Fest. They recently released Stans Race Sealant, which is supposedly better but also quite expensive.

    https://mbaction.com/tire-sealant-shootout/

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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    OS doesn't booger for me, but it does make a full elastic coating inside the tire that's a bit of a pain to peel off. When someone comes up with something that works and never dries out they'll make a billion bucks.
    Have you guys had a puddle of Orange Seal solidify inside the tire? It forms a tacky orange patch that reminds me of the orange part of a standard patch from a patch kit.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails thinking about going tubeless-patches.jpg  


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    I seat my tire first and then remove the air, add the sealant by removing the valve core and push the sealant in through the valve stem. Reinsatll the core. Then pump it up to around 50psi. Twirl it around, or ride around if I put it on the bike. Let it sit for the night and then adjust to my desired air pressure. This results in virtually no sealant loss and very little mess.
    When removing sealant from an old tire I break the bead on one side, suck out the sealant with a syringe and reuse it in the new tire.
    15-20 minutes tops and really not very messy at all.

    Switched from Stans to Orange seal the last few seasons. No more Stanimals creeping around on the inside of my tires.
    Hello, my name is human and I came down from the stars.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    I seat my tire first and then remove the air...
    Getting the bead to seat is my major malfunction. The rest is perfunctory.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    Getting the bead to seat is my major malfunction. The rest is perfunctory.
    A little soapy water goes a long way with a stubborn tire. I can usually seat most tires with a floor pump. But once in a while I use a co2 cartridge.
    Hello, my name is human and I came down from the stars.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    OS doesn't booger for me, but it does make a full elastic coating inside the tire that's a bit of a pain to peel off. When someone comes up with something that works and never dries out they'll make a billion bucks.
    Why bother to remove the coating?

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    I'm just as surprised when I see someone running tubes as I am when I see a cassette.
    Didn't take you for a freewheel fan, but OK.
    I'll keep running tubes and cassettes.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    I seat my tire first and then remove the air, add the sealant by removing the valve core and push the sealant in through the valve stem. Reinsatll the core. Then pump it up to around 50psi. Twirl it around, or ride around if I put it on the bike. Let it sit for the night and then adjust to my desired air pressure. This results in virtually no sealant loss and very little mess.
    When removing sealant from an old tire I break the bead on one side, suck out the sealant with a syringe and reuse it in the new tire.
    15-20 minutes tops and really not very messy at all.

    Switched from Stans to Orange seal the last few seasons. No more Stanimals creeping around on the inside of my tires.
    I do almost the exact same method. It's just easier, simpler and cleaner in my opinion. Except, I do it with Stan's.... not out of any other reason but for the fact that it was first I used and had no reason yet to switch.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zowie View Post
    Didn't take you for a freewheel fan, but OK.
    I'll keep running tubes and cassettes.
    Love my cassettes too! It ain't out of style and prob won't be any time soon. To each their own

  56. #56
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    HELP! I have had to put a stupid tube back in because I am having my air and Stans blow out between my valve and rim. Whats going on? I figured I had a bad valve so I bought a new one, shoved it in, put the Stans in, blew some air in her and as soon as I go over 20 lbs she springs a leak and looses all the air. As its leaking I shake the tire and the leak will stop for a moment, but as soon as the pressure increases over about 20... Psssssssss UGH! Any suggestions? I thought I had a wrinkle in my tape but that looks ok.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by bohake View Post
    HELP! I have had to put a stupid tube back in because I am having my air and Stans blow out between my valve and rim. Whats going on? I figured I had a bad valve so I bought a new one, shoved it in, put the Stans in, blew some air in her and as soon as I go over 20 lbs she springs a leak and looses all the air. As its leaking I shake the tire and the leak will stop for a moment, but as soon as the pressure increases over about 20... Psssssssss UGH! Any suggestions? I thought I had a wrinkle in my tape but that looks ok.
    Make sure you have no rim damage. I have had to wrap teflon tape around a valve before to keep it from leaking. But not usually on a new valve.
    Hello, my name is human and I came down from the stars.

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    The rims are in good shape. I'll try new tape the next time I revisit this problem. Tomorrow I'm just going to have to ride Thunder with 35 psi so I don't flat.

  59. #59
    Nat
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    What was I saying earlier about tubeless downsides?

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by bohake View Post
    HELP! I have had to put a stupid tube back in because I am having my air and Stans blow out between my valve and rim. Whats going on? I figured I had a bad valve so I bought a new one, shoved it in, put the Stans in, blew some air in her and as soon as I go over 20 lbs she springs a leak and looses all the air. As its leaking I shake the tire and the leak will stop for a moment, but as soon as the pressure increases over about 20... Psssssssss UGH! Any suggestions? I thought I had a wrinkle in my tape but that looks ok.
    It could be that the valve isn't tight enough but any air/sealant that gets into the rim cavity will come out the valve hole.

    Tubeless is a PIA. Might be worth it in your case since you have goatheads.
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  61. #61
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    I JUST came back from garage after switching rear to tubeless.
    I switched front about two-three weeks ago (Specialized Butcher 2Bliss). It's all good. Sidewalks weep a little though. Just check air before ride.

    I had two pinch flats at the back since than. 🙄
    Ive had no flats at all for more than a year before. I think I'm riding little harder now

    So I got Maxiss Ardent EXO TR for the front. put it in today. Both times went very easy. 30 min. Taking my time.
    Remove valve core.
    Bead set easily with the compressor. Tried with pump. Impossible.
    Pump to 60 PSI. Listen for pops from bead. Than back off to riding preassure.

    Also. Front one lost almost all preassure over night right after I did it. So I pumped it up and went for a ride. That spread the sealant out real good. Since than I probably loose 1 psi /day.

    Rear one had been holding like a champ for half an hour now :P

    All with stans. And gorilla tape. I heard good things about orange though.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by bohake View Post
    HELP! I have had to put a stupid tube back in because I am having my air and Stans blow out between my valve and rim. Whats going on? I figured I had a bad valve so I bought a new one, shoved it in, put the Stans in, blew some air in her and as soon as I go over 20 lbs she springs a leak and looses all the air. As its leaking I shake the tire and the leak will stop for a moment, but as soon as the pressure increases over about 20... Psssssssss UGH! Any suggestions? I thought I had a wrinkle in my tape but that looks ok.
    One tip is when you "tape" your rim, put a tube in at least overnight at relatively high pressure. That will help "press" the tape to the rim far better than you can do manually. Even better is to go do a ride with the tube in. This also helps you set the tire for tubeless, because then you break the bead on one side, fish the tube out, soap up the rim, and you can usually set the tire pretty easily with a floor pump at this point. As was pointed out, when the air is leaking out of the valve hole like that, it's often due to air getting through the tape and into the rim, which also means sealant is getting in there.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    OS doesn't booger for me, but it does make a full elastic coating inside the tire that's a bit of a pain to peel off. When someone comes up with something that works and never dries out they'll make a billion bucks.
    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Why bother to remove the coating?

    Usually by the time I get enough OS (or my new favorite sealant the Bontrager TLR stuff) accumulated in my tire to matter, the outside is so trashed it all goes in the garbage.
    Donít modify the trail to match your skills, modify your skills to match the trails.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    One tip is when you "tape" your rim, put a tube in at least overnight at relatively high pressure. That will help "press" the tape to the rim far better than you can do manually. Even better is to go do a ride with the tube in. This also helps you set the tire for tubeless, because then you break the bead on one side, fish the tube out, soap up the rim, and you can usually set the tire pretty easily with a floor pump at this point. As was pointed out, when the air is leaking out of the valve hole like that, it's often due to air getting through the tape and into the rim, which also means sealant is getting in there.
    Thanks Jayem, yea it has to be the tape. Your idea with the tube is a good one. Thanks!

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