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  1. #1
    hold my beer & watch this
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    Spoke Tension Adjustments

    Noticed on the last ride that I was getting some spoke noise (plinking), that I think indicates loose spokes. Being totally ignorant on wheels, I bought a Park TM-1 to see where I stood on tension, info below.
    Let me also say that the wheels are true and appear to be centered correctly, the bike has disc brakes, and I am about 160 lbs.

    Front wheel:
    Brake side - Avg tension 128.7 kgf / min 117 kgf / max 134.5 kgf
    Right side - Avg tension 73.9 kgf / min 65.4 kgf / max 82.8 kgf
    Rear wheel
    Brake side - Avg tension 70.4 kgf / min 57.2 kgf / max 78.8 kgf
    Right side - Avg tension 120.8 kgf / min 112.2 kgf / max 131.5 kgf

    Now my question(s)
    If I am hearing spoke noise, and considering the wheels are true, should I tighten all the spokes 1/8 turn and recheck? Or 1/4 turn? Or?
    (flat spokes, .042" x .130")
    The spread from average is within the +/-20%; with the largest spread being the low value on the brake side on the rear due to one spoke out of the batch being looser than the rest.
    I know that spokes on one side will have more tension due to wheel design; are these relative values (right vs left) typical?
    Am I on the correct path to correcting the spoke noise or am I all wet?
    Any other source of noise I might be overlooking?
    Thanks
    Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.
    -- Robert Heinlein --

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
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    47,290
    Quote Originally Posted by willworkforbeer View Post
    Noticed on the last ride that I was getting some spoke noise (plinking), that I think indicates loose spokes. Being totally ignorant on wheels, I bought a Park TM-1 to see where I stood on tension, info below.
    Let me also say that the wheels are true and appear to be centered correctly, the bike has disc brakes, and I am about 160 lbs.

    Front wheel:
    Brake side - Avg tension 128.7 kgf / min 117 kgf / max 134.5 kgf
    Right side - Avg tension 73.9 kgf / min 65.4 kgf / max 82.8 kgf
    Rear wheel
    Brake side - Avg tension 70.4 kgf / min 57.2 kgf / max 78.8 kgf
    Right side - Avg tension 120.8 kgf / min 112.2 kgf / max 131.5 kgf

    Now my question(s)
    If I am hearing spoke noise, and considering the wheels are true, should I tighten all the spokes 1/8 turn and recheck? Or 1/4 turn? Or?
    (flat spokes, .042" x .130")
    The spread from average is within the +/-20%; with the largest spread being the low value on the brake side on the rear due to one spoke out of the batch being looser than the rest.
    I know that spokes on one side will have more tension due to wheel design; are these relative values (right vs left) typical?
    Am I on the correct path to correcting the spoke noise or am I all wet?
    Any other source of noise I might be overlooking?
    Thanks
    Spoke noise alone is not an indication of too low tension.

    Spokes can wear slightly at the crosses and make noise in normal use.

    You have a way wider tension range than I want in my wheels.
    Depending on the locations of the high/low tensions the wheel can be true without being properly built and a good builder may be able to balance the tension and keep it true.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  3. #3
    hold my beer & watch this
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    When you say "wider tension range than you want in your wheels", are you talking about the spokes on one side, or the right to left side relationship?
    I will put the info in a graph and see if anything jumps out.
    Not anxious to start adjusting on spokes, just wanting to make sure I have everything properly maintained and ready to go for summer.
    Wheels are something I have never fooled with, but I figure if I am going to be riding, I should know something about what to do on them. I looked at the wheel links on the sticky; they deal with building a new wheel from scratch (not interested at all in that), but don't really address wheel maintenance.
    Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.
    -- Robert Heinlein --

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
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    Spoke Tension Adjustments

    Quote Originally Posted by willworkforbeer View Post
    When you say "wider tension range than you want in your wheels", are you talking about the spokes on one side, or the right to left side relationship?
    I will put the info in a graph and see if anything jumps out.
    Not anxious to start adjusting on spokes, just wanting to make sure I have everything properly maintained and ready to go for summer.
    Wheels are something I have never fooled with, but I figure if I am going to be riding, I should know something about what to do on them. I looked at the wheel links on the sticky; they deal with building a new wheel from scratch (not interested at all in that), but don't really address wheel maintenance.
    On a side.
    Side to side tension differences are always what they need to be to dish the wheel.

    I do not want to see a tension chart.

    The skills needed to maintain wheel are the same as building it. And a well build wheel needs little work...ever.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  5. #5
    hold my beer & watch this
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    Thank you for your time and assistance.
    Don't worry, I won't be posting a tension chart, I am doing that for my information.
    Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.
    -- Robert Heinlein --

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