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  1. #26
    bike rider
    Reputation: Lelandjt's Avatar
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    Kenda SB8 2.35" is a great balance of grip/cushion and rolling resistance/weight but if you ride in loose dirt its knobs may be too small for use in front. My XC/trail bike is on the "big" side with 5.5" travel and dropper post so I like these tires as anything less can't keep up with the rest of the bike but on most courses they can still be competitive in a Pro XC race.

    I see similar large volume, small knob tires from other companies that are probably also a nice balance. In the rear you can switch to one of these with little noticeable loss of grip in most conditions. In the front you'll notice less grip almost everywhere and in loose dirt it might be too much loss to be worth the rolling speed.

    With on-the-fly adjustable suspension, geometry, and seatposts and carbon's ability to get a very capable bike under 25lb tires are really the only compromise that remains between efficiency and handling and I don't see anything coming down the pipe that will change that.
    Keep the Country country.

  2. #27
    Gumnut Peddler
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    Need to figure out if you want a grippy slow roller or a faster less agressive roller
    Last edited by Grinderz; 01-26-2013 at 02:40 AM.
    Burning fat, not oil.

  3. #28
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    I agree with others that mentioned about compromise. What you had before would be considered by many to be a semi-slick. Ignitors are an out and out XC/Trail tire with grip to back that classification. There's no magic tire that does it all unfortunately.

    Currently running on a pair of Kenda SB8 2.1" and although fast rolling, is a compromise on ultimate grip. Have since upgraded to Continentals X-king 2.4 and 2.2 UST and felt it to be considerably slower rolling (weight being the main contributing factor). It's all about managing your expectation. You've got a great set of tires, go out and enjoy them!

  4. #29
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    Reputation: mattnmtns's Avatar
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    It all depends on what you want. Grip or fast rolling? I switched to a Ignitor on the rear and a Panaracer Rampage on the front from a crossmark on the rear an older style WTB Weirwolf 2.5 lt on the front. First couple of rides, same thing. I was getting smoked by friends I was usually in front of. At first I said to the hell with it, put the crossmark on the rear, ignitor on front. A fair amount better but I like something wider on the front.

    The the leaves fell and winter slop etc. I put the Ignitor/Rampage combo back on. I'm pretty happy with it. I might be a little slower climbing, but I'm getting used to it. Definitely slower, but the traction and grip is great for this time of the year. FWIW I am running them with tubes. I have also found they roll much better with more PSI probably run the Ignitor around 35, and the rampage around 38 unless its real sloppy then drop it around 32. Doesn't roll as well but grip is unbelievable.

    Once it dries out I'll probably put a crossmark back on the rear, and switch between that weirwolf and an ardent or the new minion depending on the trail.
    Sent via my heady vibes from the heart of Pisgahstan

  5. #30
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    If your trails do not contain much rock, give the Schwalbe Rocket Ron a go, at at least a 2.25" width. Amazingly grippy, allround but still fast and light tire. One of the best compromises in my book if puncture resistance is not top priority. The compound does well on wet stuff and it's true to size.

    Get some pre-2013 versions. The 2013 edition has lower knobs, which has made it a bit less allround. A good chance to get the older ones a lot cheaper too.

  6. #31
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    I think he's looking for a ust tire.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill-E-BoB View Post
    Yeah, with the old tires keeping up was no concern at all. When I was slipping on turns & roots, I was catching & passing 'em on fast sections. Only time I couldn't keep up then was on a long wet uphill because I just couldn't get enough traction to make good time.

    Not to be a smartass, but if I were enjoying the slow rolling grip machine, I wouldn't have started this thread in the first place...I'd have started one that said "Wow I love this new set of tires I got and the peace & quiet I get from not keeping up with the group anymore." I'm not going to buy every tire on the market to decide which is right for me when there are hundreds of members here with knowledge to share & help me narrow it down, that's crazy. That Aspen tire sounds great & now that I've had so much input from everybody, I even understand why I want it.

    I may still not understand how an 835g UST tire would be heavier than a 600g tire and 250g tube...but I do understand enough about tires now & the various rolling resistance factors and trade offs of more aggressive treads. And I know that if you think "get stronger" is the solution to run as fast on Ignitors as Dry 2s, we should all be on your exercise program because that's a hell of a feat!
    Aspen may or may not be a good tire for you depending on your capabilities and trails. Similar to the Ardent (which I've used and like) you have to really lay the bike over in the corners. The Aspen won't give you the climbing traction your looking for IMO. The tire will not be very durable, it doesn't come with the exo casing and has thin side walls. It's a lite X/C race tire so it will roll fast.

  8. #33
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    Aspen would be a good choice I think. Ardent still is quite heavy and has large knobs so a lot more resistance. Maxxis ADvantage might be a good idea as well. I cycled quite a lot on the Advantage, really fast tire. The only problem it couldn't take the rocky punishment I gave it so the knobs started to tear of (Aspen will have the same problem I guess). Changed the Advantage for a set of Fat Alberts Ust, but they were to bulky and a lot of rolling resistance, but an awfull amount of grip. Now back on the Ardents, hope that that one is a good compromise for my riding.

  9. #34
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    Thanks to all you guys for all the input, It's been a huge help. I spent this weekend on the Ignitor 2.35 up front & a 2.10 Crossmark in the rear & it felt MUCH more like what I was looking for. Rolls nearly as fast as I was on the Michelin's, but I've got a ton more control than before. This is a good start toward exactly the compromise I was looking for & exactly why I started this thread.

    Jeff & Jeroen, I appreciate your input, I think somehow you just wound up on a tangent that makes this seem like a much more complicated question than it was ever meant to be. I started this thread for the exact opposite purpose of over-thinking it. Debating if conditioning or skill level or type of trail or anything else had anything to do with it is a moot point...none of those variables have changed. Tires are all that changed. Sorry if my reference points confused the question. I only mentioned past experiences to give you reference to "it used to be x but now its y". One day, I do a 6 minute mile, the next day, I do a 6:30 mile. Same legs, same bike, same group, same trail, same weather, different tires. Wasn't over thinking anything, just wanted some tire advice.

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