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  1. #1
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    Sealant that doesn't dry out

    Saw Finish Line's new sealant in the news. Anyone buying this?



    https://www.bikerumor.com/2018/02/12...-tire-sealant/

    Sounds similar to Slime. Hoping someone does some comparos, personally.
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  2. #2
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    Glad to see he pumped the tire back up to see if it held. Would've been better to ride on it after though.

    A slow leak can be deadly to a rim if you hit a rock with low pressure. Sometimes just throwing in a tube is the safer course of action.

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    If that continental sidewall holds up as well as they traditionally do, the test will be done next week and the sealant will last as long as the tire.


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    I'll try a small bottle but if it never makes a skin around the inside of the puncture I see this getting frustrating.

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    Curious to see how it works out. I've been using the new Slime (STR?) and so far, so good. The more competition in this market the better!

  6. #6
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    well, if Finish Line cannot figure out their own product, I'll pass on it.

    this is what they said:

    Our testing shows that tires treated with our sealant lose less air over time than do latex treated tires. We are not sure if this is due to tighter seals around the beads, or less loss of air through the rubber.

    WTF --you aren't sure-- ? ever hear of gas permeability testing ? yeah OK I'll stick to latex, as I am sure about how it acts
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    WTF --you aren't sure-- ? ever hear of gas permeability testing ?
    I've seen way more science in the "Best Tubeless Brew" thread than I've ever seen in the ad copy for a commercial product

  8. #8
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    Depends on the price.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Depends on the price.
    Less than you'd imagine, though. With the Slime STR i've been just transferring it from tire to tire... You lose a little bit here and there, but overall I would say I'm coming out ahead over a product like Stan's where you just have to straight up refill every 6 months or if you buy a new tire.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cary View Post
    If that continental sidewall holds up as well as they traditionally do, the test will be done next week and the sealant will last as long as the tire.


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    To be fair, nobody ever rode an X-King long enough for the sidewall strength to matter.

  11. #11
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    I use Orange mixed with the new slime. Gives a bunch of different partial sizes to clog a hole, last about 6 months

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Porch View Post
    To be fair, nobody ever rode an X-King long enough for the sidewall strength to matter.
    I was thinking the same thing lol. Cant think of a better tire to waste though.

  13. #13
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    This makes me think of having a disease where your blood won't coagulate (clot).
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    I think I’ll wait for long term reviews, seems like there is always a compromise between sealing power and longevity. Latex dries up, but that also means it dries in the puncture and permanently seals.

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    so how does a non latex sealant seal the bead?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    This makes me think of having a disease where your blood won't coagulate (clot).
    Aww, give it a chance.
    Slime doesn't dry, we all know how awesome that stuff is.

  17. #17
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    Makes me think of having a disease where the blood clots in a short amount of time without provocation... oh wait... xD

    There's numerous sources, including this one, that states that rubber compounds are porous. If you compared latex tubes to butyl tubes, you'll know latex ones are much less airtight. The rubber used is tires is even less air tight. Expecting the tire to hold in air pressure much greater than that of atmospheric pressure is like expecting oriented strand board to make your home air tight--it's quite hit or miss, unless it's specifically designed with this in mind.

    Think of bag valve air masks, the kind they use to help patients breathe with a cup seal around their nose and mouth. How do they get it to seal on someone with a beard? They "grease" their beards. Similar kind of concept here. I'd ask the opposite, how does liquid latex seal a bead? Does it need the additives, or does the liquid latex do it?

    If you know air is leaking more out of a latex sealed tire, how do you know where exactly it's leaking? How do you know the tires themselves aren't the reason? Tires aren't made to a very precisely controlled science. It's more honest to say I don't know, than to jump to some conclusion or say something unproven, as people will likely treat those non-truths with some value. The results should be what you are after, not marketing wank to make you feel good about buying.

    People jumping to conclusions, making prejudgments based on skepticism... I guess that's all you can do without actual empirical data. At least can find value in Porch's prediction based off of several months of Slime STR use.

    I looked up Multi Seal's reviews for their sportsman formula and it looks like it's not as high performance (immediate short term sealing, and air loss prevention) as latex based sealants, but I'm just curious if the trade-off is worth it. I got multiple bikes and some of them sit for weeks at a time. I don't race, so I can pump tires up and carry tire plugs when needed, but then again the inconveniences might be terrible. Kind of like saving money to get an offbrand narrow-wide 1x ring and dealing with a rare chain drop here and there, up from almost no occurrences with a premium brand; might last just as long, but is this inconvenience worth it for the other benefits? One way to find out...

    Using a similar analogy:
    A) Bleeding to death without a patch (tubes, no sealant)
    B) having blood that clots as quickly as Wolverine but needs regular medical attention every few months (perhaps every surgery to remove heavy clots (tubeless ready with latex based sealant or Orange)
    C) blood thinned a bit with aspirin that is slow to clot (Slime STR and this)
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  18. #18
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    I have been using this lately and it is BY FAR THE BEST stuff I have ever used and its cheap!
    https://www.goodguytiresealant.com/

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    I'm trying to find some berrymans sealant to try but can't find a cheap Canadian place yet. My worry is long term sealant capabilities. Latex does a good job of sealing beads ect (this is my main use for it as I don't deal with thorns and the like. Ive had dry tires for months at a time and they are fine once initially sealed. I'm not sure how these finer based sealants will work but I'm willing to try. Most of my race flats would have been preventable if I had topped off the tires

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    I have been using this lately and it is BY FAR THE BEST stuff I have ever used and its cheap!
    https://www.goodguytiresealant.com/
    Wow! I like the prices of their stuff. Going to order up some valvestems and sealant and give their stuff a shot. I'm currently running Truckerco. Excellent stuff. The sealant prices aren't bad but their stems are pricey.
    I like turtles

  21. #21
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    I have had some issues with Berymans not sealing around the bead.

  22. #22
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    Aspirin was debunked years ago
    All barks have been rendered into english...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    I have been using this lately and it is BY FAR THE BEST stuff I have ever used and its cheap!
    https://www.goodguytiresealant.com/
    ~$30 a liter is pretty much the standard pricing for the popular sealants isn't it?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deerhill View Post
    Aspirin was debunked years ago
    Which one has aspirin?

    Quote Originally Posted by literally View Post
    ~$30 a liter is pretty much the standard pricing for the popular sealants isn't it?
    Yeah, I noticed that too. $23 + $5 shipping isn't really a steal for 32oz. Stans is $25 on Amazon for the same amount.

  25. #25
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    I pick it up in a shop in town so I dont pay the 5 in shipping. But i do know it works way better than normal stans. I was running stans race all last year so this was $20 a bottle cheaper and work just as well or better. I never had and luck with normal stans other than just doing the "please seal" shake like the guy on the video. Lubes, sealants, fluids, tires I normally just buy from LBS in town so I can admit I do not know what you can get stans on Amazon for, but I do know that it cost me a whole bunch less than the other options.

  26. #26
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    Sealant that doesn't dry out-uploadfromtaptalk1518716867981.jpg

    Not to sound like a shrill but I took this picture of the inside of a set of tires when I swapped to winter tires. Left is good guy right is stans race. I spun both before I took off and took off it the exact same time just to see coating effect. I will let you decide on which you think might seal better.

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  27. #27
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    well technically left=bottom and right=top....

  28. #28
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    not doubting its effectiveness just that that price isn't out of the ordinary.
    i've been using truckerco for $22 for a full actual liter without any issues for years but like a lot of people, sealing the bead is what i look for, not necessarily tread punctures.
    probably going to give e13 a shot next since it's even cheaper for 32 oz.
    i'll wait for reviews on finish line and peaty's once they are in use.

  29. #29
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    As if people have the sharp senses and knowledge to make a judgement based on a pic. Speculation is worthless compared to actual results. I'm not going to judge by marketing wank trying to glorify differences that might not even matter. I want to know which results in more worry-free performance and lower maintenance. Which sprays less crud when punctured? Doubt many like their clothes and gear splattered by latex sealant.

    Interesting start to a comparo test though.
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  30. #30
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    Sealant that doesn't dry out

    This looks like good stuff and Finish Line puts out quality products. I'm tired of latex sealants that dry up. I'm going to try this stuff when I run out of Orange Seal, unless I read negative reports otherwise. I'd also like to see a head to head test against Orange Seal.

  31. #31
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    I dont know if tire coating is related to sealing.

    I was using truckerco for a while, and it coats the tire like paint. It would pool for a while, then something happened and it turned into paint. At that point, it was incapable of sealing even tiny punctures, and rolling resistance increased. I think sealant needs to pool to actively seal up punctures.

    If sealant is painting the tire for 360 degrees, thats a whole ton of sealant not available to slosh over a puncture and help seal.

    From that picture, it looks like stans is doing a better job. I had the goodguy site pulled up to order (I like to try new sealants), but I closed it after I saw that coated tire.

  32. #32
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    Agree. No point in coating the tire, just seal the leaks.

    LBS got a sample of this stuff in. It's grey with black flecks and no odor. It reminds me of a sealant I used on moto tires like 30 years ago. That stuff looked the same but it had clumps of fibrous stuff in it. I didn't see any clumps in the bottle of Finish Line stuff.

    I'm in no hurry to switch from Stan's. I'll wait until I see/hear more reviews...and maybe try it when I'm out of Stan's and put new tires on.
    Do the math.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I dont know if tire coating is related to sealing.

    I was using truckerco for a while, and it coats the tire like paint. It would pool for a while, then something happened and it turned into paint. At that point, it was incapable of sealing even tiny punctures, and rolling resistance increased. I think sealant needs to pool to actively seal up punctures.

    If sealant is painting the tire for 360 degrees, thats a whole ton of sealant not available to slosh over a puncture and help seal.

    From that picture, it looks like stans is doing a better job. I had the goodguy site pulled up to order (I like to try new sealants), but I closed it after I saw that coated tire.
    I thought tubeless ready tires required a paint like seal as the casing is porous? They won't hold air for long without sealant, unlike UST tires.

  34. #34
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    I crunched some numbers. I know the great majority of you hate numbers and math, preferring anecdote and superstitious hear-say, but some of you might get something out of it.

    For mountain bikes, My home-brew latex sealant is $1.50/tire which is 6oz and lasts a year if necessary.

    Since they recommend 4oz for 2.4" tires, that is 2 tires per 8oz bottle. It would need to be $3 or less to make a sale to me.

    For road tubeless or latex tube, I would pay more for it, perhaps $5 per tire. With less sealant necessary per tire, a $20 bottle would make a sale.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Doubt many like their clothes and gear splattered by latex sealant.
    The last thing I'm worried about when riding is getting stuff on my clothes. This isn't the roadie forum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    I crunched some numbers. I know the great majority of you hate numbers and math, preferring anecdote and superstitious hear-say, but some of you might get something out of it.

    For mountain bikes, My home-brew latex sealant is $1.50/tire which is 6oz and lasts a year if necessary.

    Since they recommend 4oz for 2.4" tires, that is 2 tires per 8oz bottle. It would need to be $3 or less to make a sale to me.

    For road tubeless or latex tube, I would pay more for it, perhaps $5 per tire. With less sealant necessary per tire, a $20 bottle would make a sale.
    your home brew once in your tires never dries out, never needs replenishing and that initial 3oz lasts the life of your tire?

  37. #37
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    6oz per tire, literally.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    6oz per tire, literally.
    your home brew once in your tires never dries out, never needs replenishing and that initial 6oz lasts the life of your tire?
    if so i'm curious what your recipe is as i've never had a latex based sealant of any kind last that long regardless of initial application amount. 6oz is a lot compared to most recommended amounts.

  39. #39
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    Mud washes off. Latex doesn't. Might need something with ammonia, but I haven't tried it.

    Is that 6 oz by volume or weight? Sounds heavier than a standard tube. 1 year to dry out by virtue of having lots in it (3x the suggested stan's dose of 2oz)?
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    1 year to dry out by virtue of having lots in it (3x the suggested stan's dose of 2oz)?
    yea that's a different story when comparing to other sealants recommended amount and lifespan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by literally View Post
    your home brew once in your tires never dries out, never needs replenishing and that initial 6oz lasts the life of your tire?
    if so i'm curious what your recipe is as i've never had a latex based sealant of any kind last that long regardless of initial application amount. 6oz is a lot compared to most recommended amounts.
    Yeah, I put a lot in because I don't want to mess with it for a while. It's 1/3 1/3 1/3 latex, water, antifreeze. Nothing fancy.

    Varaxis - by volume. I fill up a 12oz gatorade bottle, shake, and split it between 2 tires. I really don't care about a little extra weight.

  42. #42
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    Antifreeze, eh? Makes me appreciate the eco friendly stance of commercial bicycle tire sealant. I guess that's one way to keep it from drying out, yet transport the solids to plug leaks. Makes me consider just adding water periodically... xD
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  43. #43
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    I use orange seal and sub zero in the fall / winter.

    Anyone try this supposedly it lasts one year which is longer than a pair of tires will last if you ride a bit:

    Flat Stopper is the most advanced industrial, commercial, heavy duty tire sealant available

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Antifreeze, eh? Makes me appreciate the eco friendly stance of commercial bicycle tire sealant. I guess that's one way to keep it from drying out, yet transport the solids to plug leaks. Makes me consider just adding water periodically... xD
    Stans MSDS lists ethylene glycol. I do not know its specific purpose.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Stans MSDS lists ethylene glycol. I do not know its specific purpose.
    Not sure what it's used for either, besides doing what it says on the bottle (anti-freeze). Less likely to evaporate too? Just know the ethylene glycol is seriously toxic if ingested by humans and animals, and stunts the growth of plants in very little doses and does something to groundwater. The propylene glycol that replaces it in modern anti-freeze is less toxic. Glycerol is another used for anti-freeze.

    Tried to verify your findings, as that'd be pretty bad considering it says non-toxic right on the bottle, and see that Stan's has propylene glycol. As I said above, this is the non-toxic replacement of ethylene glycol. Looks like they commonly dye it pink instead of flo yellow/green.
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by newking View Post
    I use orange seal and sub zero in the fall / winter.

    Anyone try this supposedly it lasts one year which is longer than a pair of tires will last if you ride a bit:

    Flat Stopper is the most advanced industrial, commercial, heavy duty tire sealant available
    i forgot about that stuff after reading about it last year. wasn't it also supposed to be available in powder form to be mixed as needed?

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Agree. No point in coating the tire, just seal the leaks.

    LBS got a sample of this stuff in. It's grey with black flecks and no odor. It reminds me of a sealant I used on moto tires like 30 years ago. That stuff looked the same but it had clumps of fibrous stuff in it. I didn't see any clumps in the bottle of Finish Line stuff.

    I'm in no hurry to switch from Stan's. I'll wait until I see/hear more reviews...and maybe try it when I'm out of Stan's and put new tires on.
    It looks like country gravy... Delicious. Gravy also doesn't dry out (it's bacon fat based, it just congeals). Gravy is filled with chunks of different sizes that would plug punctures of many sizes...flour, black pepper, sausage.

    I think we can conclude that the finish line sealant is either country gravy, or at least that country gravy would be a good sealant.

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    Yes, you're right. I have the pink stuff, propylene glycol. For RV use.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    This looks like good stuff and Finish Line puts out quality products. I'm tired of latex sealants that dry up. I'm going to try this stuff when I run out of Orange Seal, unless I read negative reports otherwise. I'd also like to see a head to head test against Orange Seal.
    Same here on both counts, though I'll willingly toss the jug of Orange Seal if the Finish Line cleans up easy. My use is not very demanding, as I have practically no risk of punctures where I ride, just need something to keep the tire sealed. 2oz of Orange Seal is all I ever use, and there's plenty left over whenever I switch tires. It's that coating over the whole inside of the tire that's a PITA to get rid of, and I'm now wanting to swap tires more often, or at least seasonally. If this stuff works as advertised, it'll definitely be a worthwhile "upgrade" for me.

  50. #50
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    What was disconcerting was that in the video, the punctures never fully sealed. I wonder if it takes more time to do so, or is the product not as good as latex based sealant, which seals quickly.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    What was disconcerting was that in the video, the punctures never fully sealed. I wonder if it takes more time to do so, or is the product not as good as latex based sealant, which seals quickly.
    they also didn't test it in the best way to mimic riding. at a minimum they should have kept the wheel on the bike and spun it after the punctures. but really these sealant tests should involve riding over something to cause the puncture and continue riding as you normally would.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Stans MSDS lists ethylene glycol. I do not know its specific purpose.
    Besides the obvious, either variety of glycol will lower the vapor pressure of the mix.

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    Retail price is out, $40/liter.

  54. #54
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    copy/paste

    in general:

    The base substance of a tyre sealant is either glycol or latex. Glycol is a water based substance that can be either ethylene or propylene, Propylene is non-toxic and Ethylene is toxic. Latex on the other-hand is a non-water based substance commonly found in bicycle tyre sealants. Latex has a lower production cost and doesn’t require additives such as fibres to function as a sealant. It has proven to be very effective, but has a limited life span and dries in the tyre after about 15 000km. Once dried, it has shown to adhere to the tyre and rim. Removal and repairing of the tyre is often impossible. The high concentration of ammonia in latex sealants can corrode metals and degrade the rubber of the tyre.

    There are many benefits to using Propylene Glycol sealants due to its water soluble properties. It has an indefinite shelf life and can be reused. It is easily washed out with water, is non-toxic and non-flammable. It acts as a corrosion retardant and inhibits tyre degradation, thereby promoting higher rates of success for retarding and re-treading. Prevents standard air loss, bead leaks and reduces running temperatures. Coupled with its superior sealing capability, glycol tyre sealants prove to be an efficient tyre maintenance and cost effective solution for commercial and private industries.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    copy/paste

    in general:

    The base substance of a tyre sealant is either glycol or latex. Glycol is a water based substance that can be either ethylene or propylene, Propylene is non-toxic and Ethylene is toxic. Latex on the other-hand is a non-water based substance commonly found in bicycle tyre sealants. Latex has a lower production cost and doesn’t require additives such as fibres to function as a sealant. It has proven to be very effective, but has a limited life span and dries in the tyre after about 15 000km. Once dried, it has shown to adhere to the tyre and rim. Removal and repairing of the tyre is often impossible. The high concentration of ammonia in latex sealants can corrode metals and degrade the rubber of the tyre.

    There are many benefits to using Propylene Glycol sealants due to its water soluble properties. It has an indefinite shelf life and can be reused. It is easily washed out with water, is non-toxic and non-flammable. It acts as a corrosion retardant and inhibits tyre degradation, thereby promoting higher rates of success for retarding and re-treading. Prevents standard air loss, bead leaks and reduces running temperatures. Coupled with its superior sealing capability, glycol tyre sealants prove to be an efficient tyre maintenance and cost effective solution for commercial and private industries.
    Does glycol in and of itself seal a tire, or does it depend on the fibers? If the latter, how can it sealant a porous tire? On a new tire, I had tiny bubbles coming out of the sidewall.

  56. #56
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    I would think its the fibers. The only way I can see the glycol itself sealing a porous tire is if it were able to create a chemical reaction with the rubber to collapse/seal up the micro holes. Latex based sealants do this by creating an air tight layer/barrier of latex.

  57. #57
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    I know a guy that uses slime exclusively in his tires. Granted it might not work in all tires. Given the porosity of some light weight tires.
    The thought of thinning slime with propylene glycol has crossed my mind

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    Does glycol in and of itself seal a tire, or does it depend on the fibers? If the latter, how can it sealant a porous tire? On a new tire, I had tiny bubbles coming out of the sidewall.
    This is my biggest concern. That's pretty much the main reason I use sealant.

  59. #59
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    I see the liquid latex as just an "adhesive". It'd just gush out of holes without clotting substances, before it could manage to dry around the hole (maybe catching outside dust/dirt to help clot). The 50/50 water/anti-freeze mix carries the latex and clotting substance (e.g. black pepper, cornmeal, fibers such as "static grass", "Stans crystals", and glitter) to the leak. Commercial options include anti-corrosive additives to counter the impurities in the water and the ammonia in liquid latex (which off-gasses and allows the latex to solidify). Ammonia corrodes aluminum, more so on aluminum with a thinner oxidation layer (anodizing is a thickened oxidation layer). Stronger ammonia concentrations will work through the oxidation layer. The off-gassed ammonia is known to eat unfinished brass and aluminum nipples.

    Finish Line/Multi-Seal ditched the stuff that could dry out and simply rely on a specific clotting agent that can work decently without an adhesive to bind the clot.

    Adding more clotting agent (e.g. glitter, Stan's crystals in their Race formula) reportedly improves the performance of sealants. Not sure why people look to thin out sealants. I know I rather not have sealant being sprayed/flung out of my spinning tires.

    Brands that use liquid latex in their formula can claim it's ammonia free, because it has less than 1% in the concentration. It's marketing loophole, like sugar-free Tic Tacs or fat-free non-stick spray. Ammonia helps the latex in its liquid state, and liquid latex typically has 1% or less in its concentration already.

    I personally see the latex+clotting sealants being for high performance-oriented people that demand instant sealing, especially those running low/precise pressures who are sensitive to pressure drops. I see these non-latex offerings for those that just want "acceptable" performance in exchange for less upkeep, including the ability to leave the bike parked for a long time in between rides (e.g. back-up bikes, quivers, and maybe rentals).
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  60. #60
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    All of this stuff is really easy to try out for yourself.

    For a while I ran just RVAF and latex and it would seal thorn holes, but not as quickly.
    More clotting stuff is great, until it isn't. Just like everything.

  61. #61
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    Just saw a video on GMBN Tech (youtube). Apparently Specialized is also working on a similar product and nearing the end of the development stage. Not much more info than that, but competition is good.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by noapathy View Post
    Just saw a video on GMBN Tech (youtube). Apparently Specialized is also working on a similar product and nearing the end of the development stage. Not much more info than that, but competition is good.
    got a link to the video and timestamp where they discuss it?

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by literally View Post
    so how does a non latex sealant seal the bead?
    so i heard back from finish line regarding this :

    "We use a proprietary blend of fibers and solids. Some of which are plenty small to deal with the porosity and bead seals that latex is generally needed for. We’ve also worked a lot with the viscosity of the carrier liquid to ensure it seals beads well."

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by literally View Post
    got a link to the video and timestamp where they discuss it?
    Skip to 4:30.


  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Retail price is out, $40/liter.
    Which means about $60 here in Australia.


    No thanks.
    Less isn't MOAR

  66. #66
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    Haha! I Do NOT like that tire!

  67. #67
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    So, the best sealant is ..?
    OK

  68. #68
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    I just put some of this locally designed stuff in to try. We'll see.

    DG'S NEW - Tubeless Sealant | DG's Preventaflat
    Less isn't MOAR

  69. #69
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    So I went online and took a look at the developing company:

    Multiseal
    https://www.multiseal.us/

    They have several products listed. I asked the question:
    I am researching your product and am intrigued and would like to investigate further. Can you tell me what the differences are in formulation between your RV&Trailer, Sportsman and Outdoor Power formulas? Why the different formulations?

    The person's answer from there was:
    Thank you for your question about the different retail formulas that we offer. The three different sealants that you have seen, RV & Trailer, Sportsman and Outdoor Power are all the same as far as the sealant that is contained within the bottle. The different labels are apart of our marketing. We do a lot of business in a lot of different industries/retail markets so we had to make a label that could fit into those different industries.

    I hope this answers your question. If you would like to talk more about this, I am more than happy to talk in more detail about our retail products and our industrial products.

    Thank you,

    J.D. Webb

    Vice President - Sales


    So going online, say Amazon,

    Finish Line sealant is about $15/8 oz.

    https://www.amazon.com/Finish-Line-T...h+line+sealant

    Or the regular stuff from "Multi Seal" is about $18/32 oz.

    https://www.amazon.com/MULTI-SEAL-Ti...h+line+sealant

    I wonder what the real differences there are if any?

    If you watch the videos on their website, the sealant does seal some pretty serious holes. Then again, most other tires are pretty thick compared to bicycle tires.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=widA_Q25Ywc

  70. #70
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    FINISH LINE sealant impressions:

    So I bought this sealant for my new bike in March 2018. Sealant installed without issues, but it was heavier installed than the sealant I usually use (OrangeSeal Endurance).

    I just switched up tires for race season last week and had to remove the Finish Line sealant, what a mess that was! There was little liquid sealant in the tire and the tire was coated with a slimy goop. Not sure how well it would seal with little sealant sloshing around. I cleaned it all out and installed OrangeSeal. Weighed my bike again and sure enough it was lighter with OrangeSeal using the same amount of sealant (4 oz) per tire. Looks like Finish line, at least installed, was about 2 oz heavier per tire, so 4 oz total. That's not a big deal, but it is heavier in the worst spot on the bike.
    2018 Scott Spark RC 900 World Cup | “If you’re not first you’re last”

  71. #71
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    I've put a bottle of this Finish Line sealant in all my wheelsets recently (even my tubeless road bike) and it has sealed up and held up really well so far. I'll even go so far as to say I'm getting less air seepage than I used to with Stan's. I seem to be losing less air pressure between rides than I used to. I've also seen a couple of "wet spots" indicating a puncture that have sealed no problem without losing any or very little air. So far so good. Taking a tire off that was sealed with this stuff revealed a blue color to the stuff when it's been in a tire for a bit but cleans up and rinses off so easily compared to Stan's. That stuff is nasty.
    You can't buy happiness. But you can buy a bike. And that's pretty close.

  72. #72
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    OK

  73. #73
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    mtbr just did an official review of it's own of finishline. it couldn't seal anything

    garbage

    Finish Line Sealant review - Mtbr.com


    I'll stick with something that has liquid rubber and clogging particles
    such as glitter, like orange seal...thanks
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  74. #74
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    Crap. I just bought a big bottle of this stuff.
    I like turtles

  75. #75
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    Won’t clog valve cores but seals holes is a red flag
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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