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  1. #1
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Replaced my Nevegal with a Spec. Enduro D2 Pro and LOVE it!

    I have been looking for a new front tire to replace my Kenda Nevegal Stick-E 2.35. It seemed OK when I lived in CA and rode in Tahoe and the Auburn area (though I liked the BG better), but when I moved back east this summer, (Blue Ridge Mt's, VA), I found it to be pretty bad for the conditions here. I now understand what people are talking about when they say it lets go suddenly and dramatically in corners. I had some really close calls, and found I was really holding back in my riding.

    I thought is was just a matter of getting used to the conditions here again, but when I took the ss out with a Conti Survival Pro 2.3 on the front I seemed to re-discover my confidence as the tire held the terrain very well. So I started looking for a new front tire.

    At first I was looking for a bigger version of the Survival, but it's not really out there. I wanted large meaty knobs, but most tires sporting this in my size were over 900g. I decided on the Specialized Enduro D2 Pro. It is pretty much the same weight as the Nevegal, and from the pictures it looked like a tread pattern I would like. Plus it had a HUGE volume for it's weight.

    Anyway, I have taken it out in late fall conditions (lots of leaves, soft, a little wet, and some mud, and the typical east coast roots/rocks) and it rocks! Run at the same pressure as the Nevegal (30 psi) it feels more supple and complient than the Nevegal. The volume really is massive, meaning I can try running it even lower if I want, but I don't even think that will be neccesary. The knobs are very soft. In fact, when I first picked up the tire, I was a little concerned that they went too far with the softness. I have never felt a tire material this soft. I was afraid the side knobs would just roll over instead of grip. The sales guy told me they grip corners like nothing he's tried before, but there some squirm that could take getting used to. Well, they do grip like nothing I have tried. I found myself pushing corners like I have not done since moving back here. When cornering too hard in loose stuff, it slips just enough to let me know what's up, and then the side knobs catch and are like glue. I did not notice much squirm, only a little bit as the bike was really leaned over, but I never felt like it lessened my control. These are the same trails I've been riding all season, and I was hitting everything harder and faster than before.

    I don't think this would make a very good rear tire, because the knobs are so soft. Even though it is a dual compound tread, the center knobs are still really soft. Much softer than the Kenda Stick-E compound. I think it would feel very slow, not to mention wear out fast. Also, I'm not sure how it would do out west where things are much harder and drier, at least in the area I spent a lot of time riding.

    So, anyone looking for a respectably light, supple, large volume tire with great traction for the front of your bike for east coast conditions, I would seriously consider this one. I am considering going rigid with my ss, and if I do this is what's going on the front.

  2. #2
    29er wannabe
    Reputation: yagimax's Avatar
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    I agree with Kapusta. These tires have superb traction and grip here in British Columbia.
    Considering the soft compound, the tread wear is quite good and no knobs have torn off
    after 4 months.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    Good job! Go for it.....

    "I don't think this would make a very good rear tire, because the knobs are so soft. Even though it is a dual compound tread, the center knobs are still really soft. Much softer than the Kenda Stick-E compound. I think it would feel very slow, not to mention wear out fast. Also, I'm not sure how it would do out west where things are much harder and drier, at least in the area I spent a lot of time riding." - Kapusta

    - Give it a try as a rear, really.
    I rode the Reso F & R in Tahoe and Downieville this past Summer and it pulled through with minor wear & tear plus it worked well climbing to boot! It's also a relatively cheap tire too compared to Kendas and Conti's.

    - Dave

  4. #4
    Slow Patrol
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    The Stick-E rubber is a 50 durometer compoud. The DTC Kenda stuff is 60 center and 50 side. The Enduro D2 uses 60 in the center and 50 on the sides. The resolution D2 is 65/55. Higher numbers are harder rubber.

  5. #5
    eBiker
    Reputation: Mr.P's Avatar
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    Thanks for the write up.

    I get to try some in Downieville tomorrow. Later I think they will be my winter tires this year on the wet conditions SS for Auburn & environs.

    I ran the Resolution for 6 months which did really well in Tahoe and Auburn, but it just rolled too slow on hardpack. Light, grippy, no pinchies... almost there!

    P

  6. #6
    I throw poo
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    Where in Va are you? I'm also in Va and I'm getting ready to build up a 5X5 trail bike, and I'm trying to decide weather to stay with my Resolution D2/ Roll-X D2 F/R combo or go to something like the Enduro.
    Dang it, now I'm running a coolness deficit for sure.

  7. #7
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NormanPCN
    The Stick-E rubber is a 50 durometer compoud. The DTC Kenda stuff is 60 center and 50 side. The Enduro D2 uses 60 in the center and 50 on the sides. The resolution D2 is 65/55. Higher numbers are harder rubber.
    How do they come up with the durometer number? I'm not disagreeing with the numbers, but when I give the side knobs up each a pinch, the Enduro feels softer.

    Is the durometer a measure of softness or wear life? Maybe the enduro is softer but wears the same as the kenda? Chalk is harder than rubber, but easier to wear down.

  8. #8
    Bicyclochondriac.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovemonkey
    Where in Va are you? I'm also in Va and I'm getting ready to build up a 5X5 trail bike, and I'm trying to decide weather to stay with my Resolution D2/ Roll-X D2 F/R combo or go to something like the Enduro.
    I'm in Blacksburg, and a ride here and in Roanoke. For what it's worth, I'm on a 5x5 bike as well. I don't know anything about the Roll-X or Resolution, so I really can't compare them. The tires of similar size that I've run in the front are:

    Kenda Nevegal 2.35 Stick-E
    Kenda Blue Groove 2.35 Stick-E
    WTB Weirwolf 2.5
    Conti Diesel 2.5
    Kenda Kinetics 2.35 (actually a little smaller than the rest listed here)

    \I think I like the Enduro more than any of these for the conditions here.

  9. #9
    Slow Patrol
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    Durometer is a measure of how squishy the rubber is. A more technical term would be the rebound rate. A softer rubber will wear faster than a harder rubber. A softer rubber will conform/bend more than a harder rubber and thus normally provides more traction than harder. As for wear that is an entirely different matter that none of us in these forums can definitively address. Even you I/you/we rode the same miles on the same trails with different tires, this is not a good wear test is most cases. Meaning we do not ride the same trail the same way on any occasion.

  10. #10
    Birthday Collector
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    Durometer is a scale that relates to how far a steel rod can be pressed into a sample of a rubber, plastic or other material... The less that it can deform the material, the higher the durometer reading is. There are some different scales that are used, and I think that there are 2 different scales that are used for polymers like rubber and soft plastics. Softer durometer rubber will let a rock or protrusion deform the tire rubber more than a harder durometer rubber will, so the soft tire has a greater mechanical bond with a hard surface like rock or root.

    Durometer does not test for tear or abrasion resistance so it cannot tell you how a tire will wear. While I'm no chemical engineer, I do know that "long chain" molecules tend to make material that is more resistant to being pulled apart. Some tire rubbers using these "long chain" molecule compounds will hold up better. There is a fine line that they acheive through testing to get a soft, grippy tire that still holds up well against knobs tearing off, scuffing down to a smooth surface after a few rides, etc.. Some of the latest Specialized compounds seem to do really well with this. A few years ago their tires worked well for a few rides, then the knobs were gone. Now, they are holding up better and still gripping. I use the Adrenaline/Resolution DTC tires for muddy conditions. They seem to grip well and also hold up pretty good too. A tire that has some wet dirt on it slides on a rock until that wet dirt get rubbed off, then the tire has to start gripping that rock without hopefully getting torn to pieces. Michelin tires seem to do pretty well on compound too - but I have not found a tread pattern in their tires that works for me (yet).

    These "long chain" compounds tend to cost more, so it is either a more expensive tire or made by a larger company that has massive volume discounts and can keep the price more reasonable just because they make a ton of tires and buy more of these compounds. I have found that IRC and Kenda (non-Sick-E) tires seem to both have a sort of medium compound but the IRC tends to tear less. I think that their tires work well, but a lot of that may be tread design and casing material selection as well as compound. There is a lot that goes into tire manufacturing. I'd like to see what they could do with a really great compound.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    after putting around 50 miles on the resolutions on my spec expert, i ripped through the side wall on my rear. I liked the tires much better than my old kenda's, but decided to replace the resos with pana fire xc pros. Haven't ridden the fire xc's very much and only on my buddy's blur. anybody like the fire xc pros? it was tough to decide between those and the cinders. I live in SE oklahoma and ride mostly here and western arkansas/north texas, western louisiana. Mostly hardpack with lots of rocks.
    2007 Specialized Stumperjumper FSR Expert

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