Results 1 to 77 of 77
  1. #1
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,958

    New question here. Repair for a tubeless tire?

    I've managed to puncture two tubeless-ready tires this summer. Both times, I think I must have hit a sharp, square-edged rock on the middle of the tread (not the sidewalls.) I run Stans, but on both occasions, the Stans failed to seal the puncture, even though I'd swear that the puncture size was well below the 1/4th inch size that Stan's claims to seal. (Well, the Stan's would seal at first, but upon either pumping the tire back up or trying to ride the tire, the Stan's seal would blow out and the tire would start spraying Stans and air again.)

    The first time, I wasn't really concerned and just bought a new tire. However, this last time, it happened on a relatively new Specialized The Captain Control that has a LOT of tread life left in it. Are there any products out there that will permanently repair punctures in tubeless-ready tires? I really don't want to go have to drop another $45 - $50 on a tire!!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rockymtnrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    291
    I've had to repair a Specialized Purgatory 2 times. I repaired it like patching a tube. Repair the inside of the tire.

  3. #3
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,958
    Quote Originally Posted by rockymtnrider
    Repair the inside of the tire.
    With what product? I'm assuming a regular patch kit type patch isn't going to be strong enough and likely would detach once the sealant is re-added to the tire. I've seen the Velox patch kit for tubular (road) tires, but not much else or anything specifically made for tubeless moutain bike tires.

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig
    I've managed to puncture two tubeless-ready tires this summer. Both times, I think I must have hit a sharp, square-edged rock on the middle of the tread (not the sidewalls.) I run Stans, but on both occasions, the Stans failed to seal the puncture, even though I'd swear that the puncture size was well below the 1/4th inch size that Stan's claims to seal. (Well, the Stan's would seal at first, but upon either pumping the tire back up or trying to ride the tire, the Stan's seal would blow out and the tire would start spraying Stans and air again.)

    The first time, I wasn't really concerned and just bought a new tire. However, this last time, it happened on a relatively new Specialized The Captain Control that has a LOT of tread life left in it. Are there any products out there that will permanently repair punctures in tubeless-ready tires? I really don't want to go have to drop another $45 - $50 on a tire!!
    The best I have used was a Rema Tip-Top bicycle tire patch kit, but I have not seen it offered for a few years.

    It had thin fiber reinforced patches (look almost like their tube patches), and a special high strength glue.

    Was not cheap with a wholesale price around $6 for 3 patches and glue.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    40
    Park Tools has a good general how to for tubeless tires here:
    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=154

    Easy to follow with clear pictures.

  6. #6
    Weekend Warrior
    Reputation: BadKarma145's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    66
    Why not patch it like a regular car tire?
    Rule number 2: Stay in the middle of the trail.

  7. #7
    err, 27.5+
    Reputation: AL29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,944
    You can use a glueless patch for a temp fix. I have one that has been holding for a couple of months, but they aren't permanent and the stan's will eventually get under it to open back up the leak.

    Next best is a rema tube patch kit, the glue and patch kind.

    Hutchinson also had a tire patch kit IIRC. Never have seen one in person.

    MBA Article
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    589
    Couple of drops of super-glue on hole on the inside of the tire.

  9. #9
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by BadKarma145
    Why not patch it like a regular car tire?
    Because it is not a car tire.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,540
    A guy on ebay sells an automotive type plug kit for ust tires. I bought one and it works pretty well.

  11. #11
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by lucifer
    A guy on ebay sells an automotive type plug kit for ust tires. I bought one and it works pretty well.
    Works fine for a puncture. Earthpig has a cut, compromised casing structure. A plug doe not fix that.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  12. #12
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,958
    Found this tire repair link too. http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm

    I'll try the Rema route. The key seems to be to really clean and dry the tire first, add the patch, and then let the patch dry for a couple of days.

  13. #13
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig
    Found this tire repair link too. http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm

    I'll try the Rema route. The key seems to be to really clean and dry the tire first, add the patch, and then let the patch dry for a couple of days.
    That is still instructions for a puncture repair using a standard tube patch. For most of the patches to bond permanently--or at all--the sealant (if any) must be removed completely from the area to be patched.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  14. #14
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169
    The guy who mentioned superglue has a point. I always carry superglue in my pack for trailside emergencies to seal holes that sealant won't.

    That said, I haven't tested superglue on something as big as a tread or sidewall cut. I had similar cut to the OP's, and for a permanent fix used an inside out plug/patch combo. The plug fills the hole, the patch seals the tire. Better than a patch only fix.

    http://www.jpcycles.com/product/217-...utm_medium=cse

    http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/web...i_sku=16910018

    http://www.allbatterysalesandservice...fm/4,1957.html
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: proto2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    695
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.
    Too many bikes, and just enough time to ride them.

  16. #16
    beer is good
    Reputation: Nels's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    497
    I've used the Rema tubeless patch kit, and it works pretty good...

    the patches are kinda thick so they won't blow out.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Steve
    "looking California, feeling Minnesota"

  17. #17
    Weekend Warrior
    Reputation: BadKarma145's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Because it is not a car tire.
    Thanx for your in depth explanation.

    Earthpigs link (http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm) shows what is basically the same thing as auto tire patching except that no rubber is removed from the inside of the tire. I've seen car tire patch kits which would probably work a little better because the patches are thick enuff, and the glue should bond perfectly. not sure how long the bonding process would take tho.
    Rule number 2: Stay in the middle of the trail.

  18. #18
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169
    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.
    If you unseat your bead after flatting, you better have a tube in your pack. Same if you puncture so bad neither sealant nor superglue will seal the hole. And in my case, also carry tire levers, because despite what other people say, I can never get my UST tires on or off the rims without levers. Plus, you won't have any soapy water on the trail either.

    Tube up, insert boot if necessary, pump up, ride home, repair the tire in your shop.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  19. #19
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,201
    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.



    It is often much easier to seat the beads after the tire has been mounted for awhile . It is probably best to test this in your driveway rather than waiting to find out you cannot re seat the beads in the field . A CO2 inflater may also help in the field .

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,072
    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.

    Pop in a tube

  21. #21
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by BadKarma145
    Thanx for your in depth explanation.

    Earthpigs link (http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm) shows what is basically the same thing as auto tire patching except that no rubber is removed from the inside of the tire. I've seen car tire patch kits which would probably work a little better because the patches are thick enuff, and the glue should bond perfectly. not sure how long the bonding process would take tho.
    You did not specify which car tire repair method. This is the one I usually see: http://autorepair.about.com/od/fixit.../tire_plug.htm
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  22. #22
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by dwt
    If you unseat your bead after flatting, you better have a tube in your pack. Same if you puncture so bad neither sealant nor superglue will seal the hole. And in my case, also carry tire levers, because despite what other people say, I can never get my UST tires on or off the rims without levers. Plus, you won't have any soapy water on the trail either.

    Tube up, insert boot if necessary, pump up, ride home, repair the tire in your shop.
    You need to work on your technique. No tools are needed to mount or remove tubeless tires:
    http://mtbtires.com/site2/tech/77-ho...-removal-video
    http://mtbtires.com/site2/tech/38-ge...o-mount-a-tire

    Hutchinson makes a tire lever with a soap reservoir and sponge for trailside bead lubing. work well.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  23. #23
    Weekend Warrior
    Reputation: BadKarma145's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    You did not specify which car tire repair method. This is the one I usually see: http://autorepair.about.com/od/fixit.../tire_plug.htm
    I said patch it, not plug it. I asked because I haven't gone tubeless yet, though I have the tires, strips & sealant to do so.
    Rule number 2: Stay in the middle of the trail.

  24. #24
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by BadKarma145
    I said patch it, not plug it. I asked because I haven't gone tubeless yet, though I have the tires, strips & sealant to do so.
    You still do not want to use a car tire patch as they are thicker than a bicycle tire casing. Car tires are MUCH tougher, thicker, heavier than bike tires, if you have not noticed.

    The utah... method is fine for a puncture (though you should remove the sealant, not just dry it), but not for a cut, as the OP has.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  25. #25
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,694
    I have sewed sliced tires back together.

    1st: I sew the slice using dental tape.
    2nd: I throw on a large patch.
    3rd: I cover the patch with duct tape.
    4th: I cross my fingers and hope that it work.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    971
    The two times that I have needed it I used the Hutchinson kit:



    my last cut was a 1/4th inch in a Notubes Raven. Holds up nicely (from what I can tell from the outside).
    Last edited by quax; 08-14-2010 at 02:46 AM.

  27. #27
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,958
    Quote Originally Posted by quax
    The two times that I have needed it I used the Hutchinson kit:



    my last cut was a 1/4th inch in a Notubes Raven. Holds up nicely (from what I can tell from the outside).
    This is the kit I was directed to at the LBS when I went in to buy the Rema kit. Basically, it's 4 thick patches and some superglue. For $15. WTF?

    Last Friday, I dried out and cleaned out all the Stans from the inside of the tire. I found the cut/puncture (about 1/4th of an inch or less in size, so the Stan's SHOULD have sealed it, per the Stan's claims) and applied the superglue. Waited about 30 seconds and put on the patch. Apparently, either I used too much glue or didn't wait long enough for the glue to cure sufficiently, because the patch refused to stick initially and I ruined the patch. I dried the tire off again, added a smaller amount of glue, waited longer (maybe closer to a minute) for the glue to cure, added the patch and held it together for another minute or two. Then I placed a heavy object on the tire for another 15 minutes. At that point, the patch seemed to be sticking.

    I let it dry until Sunday afternoon, and I remounted the tire on the wheel, added my normal 2 doses of Stans, and started airing it up. I got to about 70 psi with my compressor (obviously to get the bead to seal) and I noticed a little bit of Stans coming out of the puncture. I spun the wheel and the Stans stopped leaking. Unfortunately, the bead had not sealed all the way so I added a bit more air. About the time when the bead finally popped fully onto the rim (round about 90 psi), the Stans started leaking again, but a bigger leak this time. I spun and rotated the tire a few times and then let the pressure out to about 30 psi and the Stans leak stopped. I rode the tire later in the afternoon and there was no leaking. I checked the tire today and it's still holding the same pressure.

    So - does the Hutchinson kit work? Yes. Is it compatible with or designed to be used with sealant like Stan's? Unsure. Am I confident that it will hold? Not necessarily. Is it a value? No. Does it cost less than a new tire? Yes.
    Last edited by Earthpig; 08-17-2010 at 10:10 AM.

  28. #28
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig
    This is the kit I was directed to at the LBS when I went in to buy the Rema kit. Basically, it's 4 thick patches and some superglue. For $15. WTF?

    Last Friday, I dried out and cleaned out all the Stans from the inside of the tire. I found the cut/puncture (about 1/4th of an inch or less in size, so the Stan's SHOULD have sealed it, per the Stan's claims) and applied the superglue. Waited about 30 seconds and put on the patch. Apparently, either I used too much glue or didn't wait long enough for the glue to cure sufficiently, because the patch refused to stick initially and I ruined the patch. I dried the tire off again, added a smaller amount of glue, waited longer (maybe closer to a minute) for the glue to cure, added the patch and held it together for another minute or two. Then I placed a heavy object on the tire for another 15 minutes. At that point, the patch seemed to be sticking.

    I let it dry until Sunday afternoon, and I remounted the tire on the wheel, added my normal 2 doses of Stans, and started airing it up. I got to about 70 psi with my compressor (obviously to get the bead to seal) and I noticed a little bit of Stans coming out of the puncture. I spun the wheel and the Stans stopped leaking. Unfortunately, the bead had not sealed all the way so I added a bit more air. About the time when the bead finally popped fully onto the rim (round about 90 psi), the Stans started leaking again, but a bigger leak this time. I spun and rotated the tire a few times and then let the pressure out to about 30 psi and the Stans leak stopped. I rode the tire later in the afternoon and there was no leaking. I checked the tire today and it's still holding the same pressure.

    So - does the Hutchinson kit work? Yes. Is it compatible with or designed to be used with sealant like Stan's? Unsure. Am I confident that it will hold? Not necessarily. Is it a value? No. Does it cost less than a new tire? Yes.
    I have had ZERO success with the Hutchinson repair kit. Could not get the patches to stick at all. And this was on a Hutchinson tubeless tire used with Hutchinson tubeless sealant.

    I should have tried a normal patch cement but used up the patches before I thought of that.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    12
    IMO the best and easiest tubeless repair kit is this one from Weldtite:

    http://www.weldtite.co.uk/productdet...epair-kit.aspx

    very easy to use: all you have to do is to plug the repair rope into the tire hole!

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,072
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    I have had ZERO success with the Hutchinson repair kit. Could not get the patches to stick at all. And this was on a Hutchinson tubeless tire used with Hutchinson tubeless sealant.

    I should have tried a normal patch cement but used up the patches before I thought of that.

    Huh I used the Hutchison system...worked fine....

    Well no better than the Generic MEC patch kit, that also works fine...

    The Hutchison Superglue works about the same as any other superglue...All superglue requires water to cure...normally 30 % relative humidity is enough, but if you clean the surface with say acetone then you should really put some water back down.

    I wish someone made a little syringe full of superglue with a tiny needle...like a diabetic needle...

    BTW I ran across a different kind of superglue (Gorilla Glue)...it expands 3 to 4 times its volume on curing...(you need to make sure one of the surfaces is wet with water).

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    971
    I really had zero problems with the Hutchinson kit. The patches would stick without a problem. As instucted in the manual I cleaned it, degreased it, applied some glue and pressed the patch on the glue for a minute. That was all. Held firmly without a problem. No leaking of Stans visible. Seems to be working for some weeks now.

    In the past I've also used standard patches, would work just as well. The Hutchinsons were just a few Euros over here. $15 is quite hefty

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    15
    I've used this on a Bonty XR4 on 4-5mm rip in between threads Panaracer Tubeless Patch Kit - seems similar to auto type kit.
    Typically punctured on 1st outing, 1/2 hour into ride - glass or v sharp rock, it has held up well though since.

  33. #33
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by taupe
    IMO the best and easiest tubeless repair kit is this one from Weldtite:

    http://www.weldtite.co.uk/productdet...epair-kit.aspx

    very easy to use: all you have to do is to plug the repair rope into the tire hole!
    Does not work on a cut.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  34. #34
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by quax
    I really had zero problems with the Hutchinson kit. The patches would stick without a problem. As instucted in the manual I cleaned it, degreased it, applied some glue and pressed the patch on the glue for a minute. That was all. Held firmly without a problem. No leaking of Stans visible. Seems to be working for some weeks now.

    In the past I've also used standard patches, would work just as well. The Hutchinsons were just a few Euros over here. $15 is quite hefty
    I followed the instructions, too. The patches never came close to sticking to the tire.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,072
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Does not work on a cut.

    Your post #28 implies you could not get it to stick glue problem.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,072
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    I followed the instructions, too. The patches never came close to sticking to the tire.

    Interesting you must be doing something different than the others here....

    Or you got a bad patch kit???

  37. #37
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Your post #28 implies you could not get it to stick glue problem.
    Ummm...the Weldtite repair kit is nothing like the Hutchinson kit.

    THE best bicycle tire repair kit is the Rema one I mentioned early on.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rockymtnrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    291
    I just repaired a tire on Saturday using a Rema patch kit. It worked fine. It was just a regular patch for a tube. I think the rubber cement that it uses works best. Just wait the 5 minutes before adding the patch.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    561

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    12,072
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Ummm...the Weldtite repair kit is nothing like the Hutchinson kit.Post 28 you refer only to the hutchison kit

    THE best bicycle tire repair kit is the Rema one I mentioned early on.

    Well that is based partly on the fact that you can't seem to figure out how to get the hutchison kit to work....

    That alot of other people seem to be able to do....

    But whatever....in most things there is no one best thing....just a bunch of pluses and minuses.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    520

    Weldtite

    I have used the Weldtite kit a number of times(even found aftermarket spare plugs from another company at my lbs)
    The application was usually where the tread surface (NOT sidewall) sustained a cut near the base of a side knob.
    Stans/my own solution mix will only seal this until the knob moves during riding... and the tire goes flat agin. The Weldtite plugs are a lasting solution even if it doesn't look that great.
    I have also used thick patches and vulcanizing glue to fix cuts. After throrough prepping and cleaning of the area I heat it up with a hairdryer to make sure it is completely dry and do the patching while the tire is still warm.
    Goatman
    - It's not the destination that counts but how you get there -

  42. #42
    Back of the pack fat guy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,958
    I think my primary problem was not waiting enough time to let the glue dry, in addition to using too much glue. (Made it easier to sniff, though....)

    Still holding air, but (1) I mounted the stupid thing backwards (done that more than once - I should sniff the glue AFTER mounting the tire) and (2) am going to move it to the front anyway. We'll see how the remount and airing up the second time works.

  43. #43
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    am I the only one here who thinks 90PSI is way too much pressure?
    40 is usually fine 50 tops

  44. #44
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by quax
    I really had zero problems with the Hutchinson kit. The patches would stick without a problem. As instucted in the manual I cleaned it, degreased it, applied some glue and pressed the patch on the glue for a minute. That was all. Held firmly without a problem. No leaking of Stans visible. Seems to be working for some weeks now.

    In the past I've also used standard patches, would work just as well. The Hutchinsons were just a few Euros over here. $15 is quite hefty
    I also had no problems with the Hutchinson kit, clean ,Dry ,light sand , apply glue and patch, wait a couple of hours and added stans, no issues.
    yesterday I noticed my rear tire had 2 knobs hanging and a big patch of tread about the size of a quarter all hanging loose, right before a ride. I glued them all down with the Hutchinson glue and 5 mins later was on the trail. 9 miles of rocks a roots later and mostly still holding. I wouldnt ride it except for an emergency but I was pretty impressed

  45. #45
    Rod
    Rod is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5,017
    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    am I the only one here who thinks 90PSI is way too much pressure?
    40 is usually fine 50 tops
    I thought that was a red flag as well.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  46. #46
    LCW
    LCW is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LCW's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    4,286
    Anyone used this kit? (Novara from REI):

    http://www.rei.com/product/747197


    Santa Cruz Hightower LT
    EVIL Following


  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    Hey guys, I'm bringing up this old thread to help others if they're in this situation.

    Right before the start of the 'cross season, I ran over a large piece of glass, literally one day after I bought my Hutchinson Piranah tire. I was PISSED.

    After reading this thread, I went to the Park website, followed the instructions and the patch job has held through 5 races and a ton of training rides, including some mountain bike trail riding on rocks.

    If you following the directions EXACTLY how Park tells you (no rushing), you should be fine.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,529
    I used an auto radial tire patch and it held fine. Cheaper than most of those other bike patch kits too.

    BTW, some nicer shops will allow returns on Specialized tires even if punctured on the sidewalls.
    We Ride In God's Country!

  49. #49
    I dig trails!
    Reputation: Mr.P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,444
    I used the park method but with superglue on a small casing cuts:
    - Get very clean
    - scuff
    - superglue tube patch

    I've done it both inside and outside (24 hour race) and it held up for months of racing & training.

    P

  50. #50
    Trail Junkie
    Reputation: dubdryver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    2,186
    I always just carry a spare tube and a small amount of duct tape re-wrapped around a part of a pen that I cut down. Duct Tape, well thats a no brainer..a million and one uses, but in this application. I will clean the stans off the inside of the tire...usually w/ my shirt and some water, and tape the inside with duct tape if its big enough to warrant needing it, and just install the tube. It will get me out of the trail, it will get me through many rides more or until I actually have time to repair the tire.

    As for that fix, I've sewed, I've glued, and I've taped..somehow it always ends up working until I am due to replace the tire..and then sometimes even after that.

    A company called Gamma makes a kevlar tape that is very plyable, and very strong. Its used for the top of the heads on tennis racquets from getting scuffed. That actually works decent too..probably better than duct tape, and I also use it on my chainstays to protect from chain slaps.
    Ibis Ripley LS
    Intense Spider 29 C
    Cervelo S2
    Trek Boone 5 Disc
    Spech Tricross Expert
    Raleigh RX 1.0

  51. #51
    Never trust a fart
    Reputation: frdfandc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,049
    Quote Originally Posted by myitch
    BTW, some nicer shops will allow returns on Specialized tires even if punctured on the sidewalls.

    I don't get this. The fact that someone would return a tire that was damaged while riding should have a tatoo on their forehead that says "DUOCHE CANOE"

    Nothing but a jerk off move.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3
    Ummm, wouldn't it be easier to carry a couple of spare tubes - in addition to puncture repair kits, levers etc, in a back pack - particularly on very long rides and just revert to the tube in the event of a puncture?

    I guess it depends on the time and place - how far away from home one might be...

    I had my first flat in a Hutchinson Chameleon after 10 years of riding [tyres are now on their last sidewall threads!] - walked the bike back home for an hour close to dusk - figured I may as well take my time with the repair the next day as light was fading and a repair was not guaranteed.

    Glad I did - it was a ***** to find two minute punctures 10mm apart and repair with patches.

  53. #53
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by B-52 Bomber
    Ummm, wouldn't it be easier to carry a couple of spare tubes - in addition to puncture repair kits, levers etc, in a back pack - particularly on very long rides and just revert to the tube in the event of a puncture?

    I guess it depends on the time and place - how far away from home one might be...

    I had my first flat in a Hutchinson Chameleon after 10 years of riding [tyres are now on their last sidewall threads!] - walked the bike back home for an hour close to dusk - figured I may as well take my time with the repair the next day as light was fading and a repair was not guaranteed.

    Glad I did - it was a ***** to find two minute punctures 10mm apart and repair with patches.
    most people do , re read the original post, he's looking for a permanent solution to be done after hes back safely home

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chas_martel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,476
    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000
    setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.
    Not if you are using UST rims and UST tires.

    PS: Superglue for the win!
    Nobody cares...........

  55. #55
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    520
    This is what I did last time and so far it has been working after about 50 miles or so. I had a slice in the tread of my rear tire probably only an 1/8" to 1/4" long and orange seal wouldn't seal it. I called them up and orange said that in the tread they can seal punctures and they can seal slices in the sidewall because their are fibers there but in the tread there are no threads to bond to.

    I peeled open the slice on the outside and superglued it on the outside. I then cleaned out and dried the inside of the tire really well and put on a 1"x1" patch of gorilla tape and made sure all edges and corners were secured down. It seemed to feel as good as any rubber cement patch I have put on. Put sealant in an aired up.

    Repair for a tubeless tire?-img_20130714_211320_941.jpg

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ColinL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    3,075
    I believe this may not have existed when this thread was started, but it's a must-have for tubed or tubeless to seal cuts.

    Amazon.com: Park Tool TB-2 Emergency Tire Boot (Pack of 3): Sports & Outdoors

    They're so cheap and light, throw one in your hydration pack and carry on. I use UST wheels and 'tubeless ready' tires with a UST bead. I could reseat the bead on the trail. However, I might just throw in a tube instead and I do carry one of those as well.

    This is on a long trail. A short one, say less than 5 mile loop, I just keep that stuff in the car and ride lighter.

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    327
    interesting patch for the Park tools

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    292
    good thread.. I always carry marine goop for a quickie on the trail for an outside patch for a puncture like thorns..etc, or a nob tear

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Strongbrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    153
    Thanks for all the tips guys! I need to repair a tire from a thorn puncture this morning.
    Yeah, well, the Dude abides.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    335
    Quote Originally Posted by Strongbrown View Post
    Thanks for all the tips guys! I need to repair a tire from a thorn puncture this morning.
    Sealant will handle a thorn puncture. If you're not using sealant, you should be. It will save you a lot of aggravation in thorny areas.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    335

    Don't over-inflate tires to seat them

    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig View Post
    I remounted the tire on the wheel, added my normal 2 doses of Stans, and started airing it up. I got to about 70 psi with my compressor (obviously to get the bead to seal) and I noticed a little bit of Stans coming out of the puncture. I spun the wheel and the Stans stopped leaking. Unfortunately, the bead had not sealed all the way so I added a bit more air. About the time when the bead finally popped fully onto the rim (round about 90 psi), the Stans started leaking again, but a bigger leak this time.
    I realize that this was written a long time ago, but I wanted to point out that doing this is ridiculous and completely unnecessary. If a tire doesn't seat fully by the time you get to the max pressure listed on the sidewall, all you have to do is grab the area that's not seated and pull on it to get the bead to pop into place. It's easy and a lot safer than over-inflating the tire, especially when the casing is already compromised.
    Last edited by Bnystrom; 11-30-2013 at 07:18 PM. Reason: Added more content

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,531
    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000 View Post
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.
    ALWAYS ride with a spare tube. Whether you're tubeless or not.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    335
    Yup, it doesn't get much simpler than that.

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,053

    Repair for a tubeless tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by jethN View Post
    Many times people think that they should go to the shop with the lowest rates. You can save just as much as you require for an auto fix and still end up paying more than that. It is completely legal for a fix shop to charge more for the service after it is completed if it took extra supplies or hours than anticipated. A payday loan can help you pay to get your vehicle back when you do not have the extra cash.
    Thanks for the tip. Maybe next time I get a flat and can't afford a patch I can get a payday loan. Are these posts put up by robots or is some a-hole actually writing them?

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    520
    Hey, tires are expensive. My set of Racing Ralphs SS were $120 shipped and I thought that was a bargain. Payday loans here I come!

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    ALWAYS ride with a spare tube. Whether you're tubeless or not.
    Word of caution putting a tube in any tire that has been used tubeless with sealant.

    Make sure there aren't a half-dozen sealed-up thorns, wires, and shards already in the tire casing in addition to whatever necessitated the repair.

    Or, be like me and put six holes in a new tube upon inflation.
    The above statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    You need to work on your technique. No tools are needed to mount or remove tubeless tires:
    How-To: No Tools Tire Removal Video
    Cool video but I haven't met many riders who are in the habit of carrying a trash can with them. It seems like tire levers would be much more convenient.

  68. #68
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Re: Repair for a tubeless tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by spaaarky21 View Post
    Cool video but I haven't met many riders who are in the habit of carrying a trash can with them. It seems like tire levers would be much more convenient.
    The point is if you do not use proper techniques, the tire levers are still mostly useless.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    292
    cant repeat this advise enough... its tried and true and withstands time.


    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    You need to work on your technique. No tools are needed to mount or remove tubeless tires:
    How-To: No Tools Tire Removal Video
    How to Mount a Tire

    Hutchinson makes a tire lever with a soap reservoir and sponge for trailside bead lubing. work well.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    520
    I have removed quite a few tires without tire levers. I have also had TR wheels and TR tires (not UST) and the combination together can be extremely tight and have definitely needed tire levers. I have heard of others having this same problem.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    4,531
    I don't know how people are taking tires off wheels that are anything modern and not cheap (I.e. tubeless) without levers

  72. #72
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    The point is if you do not use proper techniques, the tire levers are still mostly useless.
    "Mostly" being the key word. I see what you are saying but even with the bead resting in the center, where it belongs, there's no shame in having tire levers at hand, no matter how awesome you are at changing tires without them. Even if you're just using them to pull that loose side of the tire over the rim, they come in handy, especially when you're wrestling with a flat on the trails.

    Maybe everyone should stay home and practice their technique instead of riding. I on the other hand just keep some levers in my bag and they work just fine. As a matter of fact, I needed to throw a tube in my tire just last week and the levers (along with the proper technique) helped me make quick work of it.

  73. #73
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Re: Repair for a tubeless tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    I don't know how people are taking tires off wheels that are anything modern and not cheap (I.e. tubeless) without levers
    Easy, especially if you pay attention and look at the links to the proper techniques. works with EVERY tire and rim type.
    There are a few current rims that intentionally use a larger BSD and shallower center drop which do not follow industry standards and can be a PITA, but the same methods apply.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  74. #74
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Re: Repair for a tubeless tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by spaaarky21 View Post
    "Mostly" being the key word. I see what you are saying but even with the bead resting in the center, where it belongs, there's no shame in having tire levers at hand, no matter how awesome you are at changing tires without them. Even if you're just using them to pull that loose side of the tire over the rim, they come in handy, especially when you're wrestling with a flat on the trails.

    Maybe everyone should stay home and practice their technique instead of riding. I on the other hand just keep some levers in my bag and they work just fine. As a matter of fact, I needed to throw a tube in my tire just last week and the levers (along with the proper technique) helped me make quick work of it.
    I see way, WAY too many people trying to use tire levers without first breaking the bead loose and centering the tire. they cannot even get the lever under the tire bead in the first place.
    That is like trying to open a door without first turning the knob. Brute force could still open it, but there is an easier way.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  75. #75
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    Repair for a tubeless tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Easy, especially if you pay attention and look at the links to the proper techniques. works with EVERY tire and rim type.
    There are a few current rims that intentionally use a larger BSD and shallower center drop which do not follow industry standards and can be a PITA, but the same methods apply.
    I'm talking to you, ZTR. The larger ERD makes mounting certain tires more than PITA if not impossible, without levers.. Or even with levers. I bought a rim rinch from the late Paul Morningstar, with which to smooth out the damage caused by trying to muscle a geax saguaro onto a 29" ZTR Crest with levers. I can just picture Shiggy wincing and shaking his head hearing this.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  76. #76
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Re: Repair for a tubeless tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    I'm talking to you, ZTR. The larger ERD makes mounting certain tires more than PITA if not impossible, without levers.. Or even with levers. I bought a rim rinch from the late Paul Morningstar, with which to smooth out the damage caused by trying to muscle a geax saguaro onto a 29" ZTR Crest with levers. I can just picture Shiggy wincing and shaking his head hearing this.
    BSD (bead seat diameter), not ERD (effective rim diameter).
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  77. #77
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,169

    Repair for a tubeless tire?

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    BSD (bead seat diameter), not ERD (effective rim diameter).
    Okay, didn't know the difference. But ZTR and licensees are the culprits, eh?
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

Members who have read this thread: 22

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •