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  1. #1
    Back of the pack fat guy
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    New question here. Repair for a tubeless tire?

    I've managed to puncture two tubeless-ready tires this summer. Both times, I think I must have hit a sharp, square-edged rock on the middle of the tread (not the sidewalls.) I run Stans, but on both occasions, the Stans failed to seal the puncture, even though I'd swear that the puncture size was well below the 1/4th inch size that Stan's claims to seal. (Well, the Stan's would seal at first, but upon either pumping the tire back up or trying to ride the tire, the Stan's seal would blow out and the tire would start spraying Stans and air again.)

    The first time, I wasn't really concerned and just bought a new tire. However, this last time, it happened on a relatively new Specialized The Captain Control that has a LOT of tread life left in it. Are there any products out there that will permanently repair punctures in tubeless-ready tires? I really don't want to go have to drop another $45 - $50 on a tire!!

  2. #2
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    I've had to repair a Specialized Purgatory 2 times. I repaired it like patching a tube. Repair the inside of the tire.

  3. #3
    Back of the pack fat guy
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockymtnrider
    Repair the inside of the tire.
    With what product? I'm assuming a regular patch kit type patch isn't going to be strong enough and likely would detach once the sealant is re-added to the tire. I've seen the Velox patch kit for tubular (road) tires, but not much else or anything specifically made for tubeless moutain bike tires.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig
    I've managed to puncture two tubeless-ready tires this summer. Both times, I think I must have hit a sharp, square-edged rock on the middle of the tread (not the sidewalls.) I run Stans, but on both occasions, the Stans failed to seal the puncture, even though I'd swear that the puncture size was well below the 1/4th inch size that Stan's claims to seal. (Well, the Stan's would seal at first, but upon either pumping the tire back up or trying to ride the tire, the Stan's seal would blow out and the tire would start spraying Stans and air again.)

    The first time, I wasn't really concerned and just bought a new tire. However, this last time, it happened on a relatively new Specialized The Captain Control that has a LOT of tread life left in it. Are there any products out there that will permanently repair punctures in tubeless-ready tires? I really don't want to go have to drop another $45 - $50 on a tire!!
    The best I have used was a Rema Tip-Top bicycle tire patch kit, but I have not seen it offered for a few years.

    It had thin fiber reinforced patches (look almost like their tube patches), and a special high strength glue.

    Was not cheap with a wholesale price around $6 for 3 patches and glue.
    mtbtires.com
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  5. #5
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    Park Tools has a good general how to for tubeless tires here:
    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=154

    Easy to follow with clear pictures.

  6. #6
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    Why not patch it like a regular car tire?
    Rule number 2: Stay in the middle of the trail.

  7. #7
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    You can use a glueless patch for a temp fix. I have one that has been holding for a couple of months, but they aren't permanent and the stan's will eventually get under it to open back up the leak.

    Next best is a rema tube patch kit, the glue and patch kind.

    Hutchinson also had a tire patch kit IIRC. Never have seen one in person.

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    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  8. #8
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    Couple of drops of super-glue on hole on the inside of the tire.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadKarma145
    Why not patch it like a regular car tire?
    Because it is not a car tire.
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  10. #10
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    A guy on ebay sells an automotive type plug kit for ust tires. I bought one and it works pretty well.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucifer
    A guy on ebay sells an automotive type plug kit for ust tires. I bought one and it works pretty well.
    Works fine for a puncture. Earthpig has a cut, compromised casing structure. A plug doe not fix that.
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  12. #12
    Back of the pack fat guy
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    Found this tire repair link too. http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm

    I'll try the Rema route. The key seems to be to really clean and dry the tire first, add the patch, and then let the patch dry for a couple of days.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earthpig
    Found this tire repair link too. http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm

    I'll try the Rema route. The key seems to be to really clean and dry the tire first, add the patch, and then let the patch dry for a couple of days.
    That is still instructions for a puncture repair using a standard tube patch. For most of the patches to bond permanently--or at all--the sealant (if any) must be removed completely from the area to be patched.
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  14. #14
    dwt
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    The guy who mentioned superglue has a point. I always carry superglue in my pack for trailside emergencies to seal holes that sealant won't.

    That said, I haven't tested superglue on something as big as a tread or sidewall cut. I had similar cut to the OP's, and for a permanent fix used an inside out plug/patch combo. The plug fills the hole, the patch seals the tire. Better than a patch only fix.

    http://www.jpcycles.com/product/217-...utm_medium=cse

    http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/web...i_sku=16910018

    http://www.allbatterysalesandservice...fm/4,1957.html
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  15. #15
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    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.
    Too many bikes, and just enough time to ride them.

  16. #16
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    I've used the Rema tubeless patch kit, and it works pretty good...

    the patches are kinda thick so they won't blow out.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Because it is not a car tire.
    Thanx for your in depth explanation.

    Earthpigs link (http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm) shows what is basically the same thing as auto tire patching except that no rubber is removed from the inside of the tire. I've seen car tire patch kits which would probably work a little better because the patches are thick enuff, and the glue should bond perfectly. not sure how long the bonding process would take tho.
    Rule number 2: Stay in the middle of the trail.

  18. #18
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.
    If you unseat your bead after flatting, you better have a tube in your pack. Same if you puncture so bad neither sealant nor superglue will seal the hole. And in my case, also carry tire levers, because despite what other people say, I can never get my UST tires on or off the rims without levers. Plus, you won't have any soapy water on the trail either.

    Tube up, insert boot if necessary, pump up, ride home, repair the tire in your shop.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.



    It is often much easier to seat the beads after the tire has been mounted for awhile . It is probably best to test this in your driveway rather than waiting to find out you cannot re seat the beads in the field . A CO2 inflater may also help in the field .

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by proto2000
    So how the F do you pump it back up with your pocket sized pump? Sealing after a flat is a breeze, setting the bead is a day long process in the field and many walk home.

    Pop in a tube

  21. #21
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadKarma145
    Thanx for your in depth explanation.

    Earthpigs link (http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/fix/tubeless-fix.htm) shows what is basically the same thing as auto tire patching except that no rubber is removed from the inside of the tire. I've seen car tire patch kits which would probably work a little better because the patches are thick enuff, and the glue should bond perfectly. not sure how long the bonding process would take tho.
    You did not specify which car tire repair method. This is the one I usually see: http://autorepair.about.com/od/fixit.../tire_plug.htm
    mtbtires.com
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  22. #22
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt
    If you unseat your bead after flatting, you better have a tube in your pack. Same if you puncture so bad neither sealant nor superglue will seal the hole. And in my case, also carry tire levers, because despite what other people say, I can never get my UST tires on or off the rims without levers. Plus, you won't have any soapy water on the trail either.

    Tube up, insert boot if necessary, pump up, ride home, repair the tire in your shop.
    You need to work on your technique. No tools are needed to mount or remove tubeless tires:
    http://mtbtires.com/site2/tech/77-ho...-removal-video
    http://mtbtires.com/site2/tech/38-ge...o-mount-a-tire

    Hutchinson makes a tire lever with a soap reservoir and sponge for trailside bead lubing. work well.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    You did not specify which car tire repair method. This is the one I usually see: http://autorepair.about.com/od/fixit.../tire_plug.htm
    I said patch it, not plug it. I asked because I haven't gone tubeless yet, though I have the tires, strips & sealant to do so.
    Rule number 2: Stay in the middle of the trail.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadKarma145
    I said patch it, not plug it. I asked because I haven't gone tubeless yet, though I have the tires, strips & sealant to do so.
    You still do not want to use a car tire patch as they are thicker than a bicycle tire casing. Car tires are MUCH tougher, thicker, heavier than bike tires, if you have not noticed.

    The utah... method is fine for a puncture (though you should remove the sealant, not just dry it), but not for a cut, as the OP has.
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  25. #25
    LMN
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    I have sewed sliced tires back together.

    1st: I sew the slice using dental tape.
    2nd: I throw on a large patch.
    3rd: I cover the patch with duct tape.
    4th: I cross my fingers and hope that it work.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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