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  1. #1
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    Repair sidewall cut on tire - your experience..

    Scenario:
    Almost new tire (only 200 miles on it) with most tread left and decent sidewalls (Maxxis Ikon 3C EXC) got a clean sidewall cut about 15-17mm (about 5/8 inch). The cut is not too close to the bead so it can be patched...

    The tire was used without a tube, with Stan's latex on Stan's rim. After the repair it should be used in the same way.

    1) What is your experience with fixing such tire and longevity/reliability after repair? Will the patch hold in place? Will Stan's latex disrupt the bond?
    2) What would you use? ... Standard Rubber Cement for tube repairs and patches or something else?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    You're looking at buying a new tire.

  3. #3
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    Use aqua seal outside with a patch inside and you'll be surprised at how long it holds up

  4. #4
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    I cut the side wall once. I patched it up but it did not hold air too well. I could not get the patch to bond well enough for it to hold air.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorkild View Post
    Use aqua seal outside with a patch inside and you'll be surprised at how long it holds up
    Thanks for the tip on Aquaseal; I checked it out and it seems like excellent product for rubber/ flexible things repair generally, wet suits repair; Just a good product to have around the house.

  6. #6
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    I'm not sure how well this will work tubeless, but my old shop would take a patch of heavy fabric from work pants and load it up with shoe goo. Slap it over the cut and press it with a vice for a few hours. I did that with a road tire and it held up perfectly for over a year before the rest of the tire wore out. I bet it would work with Stan's, but I can't promise you that.

  7. #7
    mountain biker
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    try this: Tech Tuesday - Repairing A Torn Tire - Pinkbike.com

    I repaired a tire this way over the weekend, but haven't been on it yet to test it out. It's a Michelin Wild Gripp'r Advanced on a NoTubes Arch rim. I don't know if the Stans will affect the rubber cement I used (it's re-soling cement for shoes).
    continuous growth is the strategy of a cancer cell.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by snellvilleGAbiker View Post
    I cut the side wall once. I patched it up but it did not hold air too well. I could not get the patch to bond well enough for it to hold air.
    I patched it too on the inside; first cleaned thoroughly- took really a lot of time to rub it with paper towel and some brake cleaner (for a long time it seemed to be soiled /greasy) and used regular Rubber Cement and extra large patch.
    .... I will see, will try to inflate the tire with sealant (my guess is it will hold just fine initially) but will have to check after week or two to see if the patch is still holding strong.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by slyfink View Post
    try this: Tech Tuesday - Repairing A Torn Tire - Pinkbike.com

    I repaired a tire this way over the weekend, but haven't been on it yet to test it out. It's a Michelin Wild Gripp'r Advanced on a NoTubes Arch rim. I don't know if the Stans will affect the rubber cement I used (it's re-soling cement for shoes).
    Thanks very interesting movie...
    What is the name of glue you are using? ( I have heard people using Shoe goo ..)
    Also do you know what glue is the guy in movie using? I can only read Extreme Repair...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ride_2_Fast View Post
    Thanks very interesting movie...
    What is the name of glue you are using? ( I have heard people using Shoe goo ..)
    Also do you know what glue is the guy in movie using? I can only read Extreme Repair...
    Found the qlue from the movie:
    LePage / LePage® Carded Adhesives / LePage® Extreme Repair™ Adhesive Sealant

  11. #11
    mountain biker
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    I think this is it:

    Five Ten Resole Barge Cement - Mountain Equipment Co-op

    but I just bought the first rubber cement I could find. I tried shoe goo, but it didn't work for me. oddly, it didn't stick on the rubber inside the tire. I could be that I clamped it too tight and pushed too much of the glue out from under the patch...
    continuous growth is the strategy of a cancer cell.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by slyfink View Post
    I think this is it:

    Five Ten Resole Barge Cement - Mountain Equipment Co-op

    but I just bought the first rubber cement I could find. I tried shoe goo, but it didn't work for me. oddly, it didn't stick on the rubber inside the tire. I could be that I clamped it too tight and pushed too much of the glue out from under the patch...
    Barge is just a brand if contact cement.

    If you attempt to repair a casing cut you must use a non-stretch material to reinforce the tire. Even then, I will not trust a repaired cut longer than ~10mm.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Barge is just a brand if contact cement.

    If you attempt to repair a casing cut you must use a non-stretch material to reinforce the tire. Even then, I will not trust a repaired cut longer than ~10mm.
    that's why I used a piece of sidewall casing I cut from an old tire. the cut in the tire I was trying to repair is only 3 or 4 mm long, if that. but still too big for Stans to seal.

    Though I have a question about that for which I've not found an answer, despite doing a search... slight thread-drift ahead... Stans sealed up the aforementionned hole quite well for about a month. But it was dry for all fo July here, and during my first ride back in the wet, about an hour and a half in and the stans "plug" blew out. I was able to get sealant in the hole again, but it only held for about 300 yards. So my question, or my hunch, is that Stans doesn't quite work as well in wet situations. Essentially, if there's enough moisture on the tire and/or in the air, the Stans doesn't dry or dissolves... Anyone else experience this? or am I dreaming it?
    continuous growth is the strategy of a cancer cell.

  14. #14
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    I’ve patched a few tires.
    1. Stitch it up with upholstery thread – help keep it from bulging.
    2. Put a normal tire patch over the cut (on the inside). Clamp and dry for a day.
    3. Next I put a tuff 2x2” patch from a generic patch kit that I think I got from Wally World over the whole thing with lots of contact cement. This patch is real tuff and didn’t bulge out the cut. The last tire (currently running) I ran out of the 2x2” patches so I used a side wall from a old tire (mostly 26" ). Clamp and let dry a few days.
    4. Mounted tire on the rear and used some black RTV to cover the Frankenstein stitches on the outside. I put the tire on the back rim because I don’t like the idea of flatting on the front on a fast decent.

  15. #15
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    I repaired a tear in a racing Ralph evo. They have wicked thin sidewalls... It was about 1/2" or so. I used a piece of an automotive patch/plug combo thing... The company that make the plug/patch is called Black Jack. Check 'em out. You can buy the patches and the "vulcanizing" glue online. I completely wore the tire out and it held just fine, did several races and bunches of trail time. Hasnt had an issue, no stitching of the tear, though I thought about it for sure. I wouldn't hesitate to do it again.

  16. #16
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I put a cut in one layer of the sidewall of a Maxxis Crossmark the other day. The other layer looks to be fine, and I can't tell if the little give I feel over that spot is a bulge, or just the torn part of the layer that's bad.

    I rode it the other day, and the tear didn't appear to have gotten any bigger.

    So - is it a problem? Would gluing an appropriate patch to the back side make a difference?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zstrange View Post
    I repaired a tear in a racing Ralph evo. They have wicked thin sidewalls... It was about 1/2" or so. I used a piece of an automotive patch/plug combo thing... The company that make the plug/patch is called Black Jack. Check 'em out. You can buy the patches and the "vulcanizing" glue online. I completely wore the tire out and it held just fine, did several races and bunches of trail time. Hasnt had an issue, no stitching of the tear, though I thought about it for sure. I wouldn't hesitate to do it again.
    How did you use the tires before the repair and after the repair? ... meaning with tube or without?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    So - is it a problem? Would gluing an appropriate patch to the back side make a difference?
    Depending on the condition of the tire and how much you value it (tread left) I would take extra step to support the cut and put a patch on the outside, possibly in the inside. Why wait till it bulges out.....?

  19. #19
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    Wasn't waiting per se. But I think I'll pull it off the bike and ride my spare. Just what I need - another minor "when I get to it" task. That's the problem with getting two of the same tire for $10 and finding I only like them on the back...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  20. #20
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    Some will fix it. I don't trust repairs on holes that big... I hate trashing a $50 tire, but that's what I'd do.

    Damn, this hobby can be expensive.

  21. #21
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    i'd use a tubeless tire patch kit like the Fast'air from Hutchinson and be extremely thorough with your preparation. For a cut that big on the side wall i'd also put three or four stitches of tough nylon thread through the casing and the patch.
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  22. #22
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    I've repaired an ~10mm cut on the sidewall of a WTB WW 2.5 front tire by using a standard automotive patch/cement on the inside & also applied a thin coating of Shoe Goo on the outside over the cut. So far it's held for over two months. And that's with psi's as low as 10-12. Given up on tubeless though so I I'm using it tubed.

  23. #23
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ride_2_Fast View Post
    Scenario:
    Almost new tire (only 200 miles on it) with most tread left and decent sidewalls (Maxxis Ikon 3C EXC) got a clean sidewall cut about 15-17mm (about 5/8 inch). The cut is not too close to the bead so it can be patched...

    The tire was used without a tube, with Stan's latex on Stan's rim. After the repair it should be used in the same way.

    1) What is your experience with fixing such tire and longevity/reliability after repair? Will the patch hold in place? Will Stan's latex disrupt the bond?
    2) What would you use? ... Standard Rubber Cement for tube repairs and patches or something else?

    Thanks
    I cut a brand new, non-tubeless Racing Ralph 2.4 in a race a few years ago (April of 2008) on some metal shard sticking out of the ground. My sidewall cut was a bit shorter than yours (more like 3/8th's of an inch), but I wasn't willing to retire the tire since it was brand new. So I stitched it with fishing line and a needle, put some sort of flexible rubber glue in the tear itself on the inside and outside and patched the inside of the tire with a thick tube patch after stitching. I used a shop clamp to hold the patch in place for an overnight dry to make sure it was set nice and tight.

    Fast forward to 2011. Same tire with the same repair is still holding up well (I use it tubeless on the front of my SS Karate Monkey now). It appears the NoTubes sealant has not degraded the interior patch as I had the tire off this week while giving my Karate Monkey a service and full maintenance check. The patch still looked good on the inside and was adhering to the tire just fine. The fishing line has not torn through any of the sidewall and things still seem to be fine to continue using it as is.

    But again, my tear was shorter than the one you experienced. It's probably a judgement call based on the length of the tear, where the tires is on the sidewall and if one thinks it is worth repairing.

    BB

  24. #24
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    A little late but my experience nonetheless.

    Got a pretty good cut in a well used S-Works Captain.
    Started about 3/8" long slice to rubber casing but not through all the threads - rode it a couple of times and got to point where a very few strings holding it together and about 1/2" circle of daylight clearly visible through casing. Realistically new tire time but just for kicks I tried a repair.

    Cleaned inside pretty well with alcohol and stuck on one on these:
    Park Tool Co. » TB-2 : Emergency Tire Boot : Tube & Tire - $4.00 for 3 at amazon
    Dab of shoo goo contact cement on outside to hold frayed threads and she was good to go.

    No assurance of long term durability and I'm happily riding it tubed on the rear and its held up pretty good for at least a couple of pretty hard rides.
    Right now looking like $1.33 and 10 mins will get me through until winter without buying a new tire.

  25. #25
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    Cut near the bead

    What about a 3/8" long cut right near the brad about 1/8" frtom where the tire and rim meet? I'm running tubes on this WTB Weirwolf 2.3 in the front.

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