Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,750

    Recommendation for front specific square-ish 2.3-2.4 aggressive XC / trail tires

    Hi,
    I am looking for some suggestions for 27.5 x 2.3 to 2.4 width tires with more square-ish profile for front tire use. I am on Velocity Blunt SS 27.5 rims with 26.5 inner width.

    I am 140lbs on a 140mm/140mm trail bike in central NY with lots of grinding pedaling and very short downhills and primitive trails with lots of roots, trail chatter. Rolling resistance is an important factor for me too.

    We have very variable weather and rain transforms the trials from one day to the next with all the roots. I find that a rounder profile with shorter softer knobs works best on the front for wet days, like Hans Dampf, Chunky Monkey, Gato, Beaver.

    However, when it is dry, I find that I really like tires with more square profile. I like to feel the sharper edges at lean angles. I've had some luck with HRII, Tomahawk, Morsa. These all suffer a little bit a low lean angles and have dead spaces in the middle tread that are problematic in the wet roots. I tried an HRII on a 30mm internal width rim and didn't like it, as it felt too squared off and hard to transition into turns.

    I have tried DHF, DHRII, SE4 and they didn't really click with me.

    Any suggestions for other tires that have a slightly squared profile for front for agro XC, fast trail use?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ColinL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    3,476
    No. What you need is a tire with intermediate knobs, and to start practicing and consciously working on leaning your bike.

    The 3 tires you mentioned all lack intermediate knobs and need a lot of lean angle to corner.

    Bikes and motorcycles are meant to lean.

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,497
    e*thirteen TRS. I like the TRS/Wild Rock'r 2 and the Vittoria Morsa/Goma side knobs for aggressive dry riding. I agree when things get hard and loose the Morsa suffers a bit; the Goma is better in those conditions, but it's a round-ish tire.

    I don't understand this statement: "However, when it is dry, I find that I really like tires with more square profile. I like to feel the sharper edges at lean angles. I've had some luck with HRII, Tomahawk, Morsa. These all suffer a little bit a low lean angles and have dead spaces in the middle tread that are problematic in the wet roots."

    Dry or wet bro?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,750
    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    e*thirteen TRS. I like the TRS/Wild Rock'r 2 and the Vittoria Morsa/Goma side knobs for aggressive dry riding. I agree when things get hard and loose the Morsa suffers a bit; the Goma is better in those conditions, but it's a round-ish tire.

    I don't understand this statement: "However, when it is dry, I find that I really like tires with more square profile. I like to feel the sharper edges at lean angles. I've had some luck with HRII, Tomahawk, Morsa. These all suffer a little bit a low lean angles and have dead spaces in the middle tread that are problematic in the wet roots."

    Dry or wet bro?
    I would say dry primarily. My goal is to have two wheelsets and go back and forth depending on weather. If there is a tire or tires that can exceed at both, I'm all ears.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,750
    Quote Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    No. What you need is a tire with intermediate knobs, and to start practicing and consciously working on leaning your bike.

    The 3 tires you mentioned all lack intermediate knobs and need a lot of lean angle to corner.

    Bikes and motorcycles are meant to lean.

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
    Can you give some suggestions for drills for working on my lean? I do figure 8 drills with cones and aggressive position, twisting hips, and countersteering to get an aggressive lean.

    Is there another approach to build the skill set for a more moderate lean to use with tires with intermediate knobs that don't require as much lean to corner.

    If anything my problem seems that I lean too much

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12,071
    Since you're experimenting a lot how about making your second wheelset or an extra front wheel wider with lower pressures and some of the high volume rounded profile XR tires with more flexible 120tpi sidewalls. XR4 2.6 could take a 35-40mm rim and less than 14psi front. XR2 comes in 2.8 Terene McFly 2.8 on a 40. Bigger footprint. Slower slide out with time to recover and change your line.
    If you go wide enough the sidewall crinkles down and you feel the grip with low pressure. Not wide enough and you'll need more pressure or it's mushy feeling.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bob-o's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    624
    Quote Originally Posted by ashwinearl View Post
    If anything my problem seems that I lean too much
    Lean the bike, not your body. You can find many how-to vids.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,494
    Maxxis forekaster may work.

    I don't really get most of what you're saying, but it fits the aggressive XC/ light trail category.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ColinL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    3,476
    The xr4 is a good suggestion. I am using one now. It has substantial intermediate knobs and is supposed to excel in all conditions but I won't see any loam ever, and rarely wet conditions until this Fall.

    Here's what the 2.4 looks like on a 30mm inner width rim (bontrager line 30). The pic was after a ride on a gravel rail trail with my family and you can see that the shoulder knobs weren't touching the ground at all. This makes it roll a lot faster, as well as cornering properly when the bike is leaned over.

    Totally agree on leaning the bike more than your body. Going fast your body will not be upright but you should never look like a moto gp rider - I mean, you could, but you'll probably end up on the ground more often than if you lean the bike more than your body. Your body weight is a very high percentage of the total being supported by tires.

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-25-2018, 07:05 AM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 02-22-2018, 08:02 PM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-01-2016, 10:05 AM
  4. mid-weight-ish winter-ish gloves
    By Jwind in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-06-2012, 02:14 PM
  5. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-08-2011, 04:06 AM

Members who have read this thread: 45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.