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Thread: Propane anyone?

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    Propane anyone?

    I was set to order some 25-gram CO2 cartridges when I stumbled across the Big Air 40-gram propane cartridges. I'm going to get one canister of it to see for myself.

    Anyone using them, if so are you tubed or tubeless?

    I'm always looking for a better way to get a bigger "bang" out of my buck!

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    Not a very good idea .

  3. #3
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    No idea what the aditives will do to the rubber, even torch hoses require special hose for it. It's not worth it!!
    And I love beer!!

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    *edit*
    changing my tune after schooling myself. i never knew the Big Airs use propane. i've used them and plenty of cyclists i know do regularly.
    Last edited by meltingfeather; 08-26-2010 at 01:16 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
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    Haha! BOOM or actually big flash!
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    probably not so smart. if you do do it at least dont bike through any camp fires!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpartyBiker
    I was set to order some 25-gram CO2 cartridges when I stumbled across the Big Air 40-gram propane cartridges. I'm going to get one canister of it to see for myself.

    Anyone using them, if so are you tubed or tubeless?

    I'm always looking for a better way to get a bigger "bang" out of my buck!
    The Big Air canisters have always been propane (as are/were many car tire inflate and seal cans--or butane). Not fuel grade gas, but still flammable. Have not heard of any issues different than CO2 in bicycle use.
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    I use them for emergency inflation- haven't noticed any ill effects (or combustion ). I like that you can easily inflate 2 large mtb tires using one canister.

    I always deflate the tire afterwards and reinflate using the floor pump.
    Tire Design & Development Engineer. The opinions expressed in this forum are solely my own.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS
    Not a very good idea .
    Could you elaborate please, or is your response based on an opinion or experience?

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    Quote Originally Posted by b-kul
    probably not so smart. if you do do it at least dont bike through any camp fires!
    I like your sense of humor

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    Quote Originally Posted by bholwell
    I use them for emergency inflation- haven't noticed any ill effects (or combustion ). I like that you can easily inflate 2 large mtb tires using one canister.

    I always deflate the tire afterwards and reinflate using the floor pump.
    I like your idea. I have some older Bontrager Race Lite wheels that I'm not afraid of damaging through propane experimentation.

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    There was a problem with instaflate cans for cars, where people would go get their tire fixed and the mechanic would be smoking, unaware that the tire was filled with flammable gas.
    Propane compatability with rubber is a good question. With instaflate, it is made for short term use. If propane has been used for a while for this application, then its probably ok.

    I could see a very slight chance of hitting a rock, causing a spark with the rim, and your tubeless tire to come off the rim at the same time.
    Or maybe even rubbing of spoke nipple with rim causing a spark. In these cases, a tube would be safer than tubeless.
    The spoke nipple thing wouldn't be a problem if the tire was filed with propane only. It needs oxygen to make a flammable mixture. But there probably would be some oxygen in the tire before you started inflating with propane.

    Other than that, awareness of the propane and taking precautions when doing maintenance (proper venting and purging before using tools, no smoking, etc), would be advised.

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    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpartyBiker
    I like your idea. I have some older Bontrager Race Lite wheels that I'm not afraid of damaging through propane experimentation.
    What's to experiment with? The propane cans have been used by racers for many years.

    bholwell's recommendation is good whether you are using propane or CO2
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    As of today I have two 40-gram canisters coming in the mail. I don't smoke or have a lack of self preservation so I don't forsee a propane related incident in my future.

    I'm sure they're the same as using a CO2 when it comes to the amount of skill requirement for useage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpartyBiker
    Could you elaborate please, or is your response based on an opinion or experience?




    As a life long welder I am pretty well versed in the dangers of flammable gases , so I guess you could say that my answer is based on both .

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpartyBiker
    As of today I have two 40-gram canisters coming in the mail. I don't smoke or have a lack of self preservation so I don't forsee a propane related incident in my future.

    I'm sure they're the same as using a CO2 when it comes to the amount of skill requirement for useage.
    isn't shipping compressed flammable gasses by mail illegal?
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    The Big Air canisters have always been propane (as are/were many car tire inflate and seal cans--or butane). Not fuel grade gas, but still flammable. Have not heard of any issues different than CO2 in bicycle use.

    In what way is the propane not "fuel grade"

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    In what way is the propane not "fuel grade"
    No idea of the details. Just what Innovations has said in the past. Less "pure"?
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    In what way is the propane not "fuel grade"
    apparently the processing to create propane can leave a lot of propylene in the mix, which can gum up engines. Higher, more expensive grades have less propylene and more propane. No idea how that really helps or doesn't help with tires or if it has any effect at all here besides price

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    apparently the processing to create propane can leave a lot of propylene in the mix, which can gum up engines. Higher, more expensive grades have less propylene and more propane. No idea how that really helps or doesn't help with tires or if it has any effect at all here besides price

    Propane is fractionated from natural gas, in which case it does not contain propylene.

    Propane may come from refineries in which case it may contain proplyene.

    There is a HD5 spec that limits propylene to 5% to prevent gum formation.

    It would be difficult to buy propane commercially not conforming to the HD5 spec.

    It may be a mixture of butane and propane, to lower the vapour pressure, so that it may be stored in a lighter container. Probably the case.

    It may be a mixture of propane and CO2....although I wouldn't think so.

  21. #21
    LMN
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    For past little while I have been using primarily nitrogen in my tires. There is some other stuff mixed in but 72% nitrogen works great.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Propane is fractionated from natural gas, in which case it does not contain propylene.

    Propane may come from refineries in which case it may contain proplyene.

    There is a HD5 spec that limits propylene to 5% to prevent gum formation.

    It would be difficult to buy propane commercially not conforming to the HD5 spec.

    It may be a mixture of butane and propane, to lower the vapour pressure, so that it may be stored in a lighter container. Probably the case.

    It may be a mixture of propane and CO2....although I wouldn't think so.
    i'm sorry, my google-fu is very weak today.

  23. #23
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    I think you might have to be Scandinavian in order to get this to work, but it's not just about the gas; the trick is in the lighter!

    On heavy rotation: White Lung: Deep Fantasy

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN
    For past little while I have been using primarily nitrogen in my tires. There is some other stuff mixed in but 72% nitrogen works great.
    Now that's funny!
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  25. #25
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    The big problem with propane is that it's 1.5 times heavier than air so you'll find the top of your tire is always flat because it all runs to the bottom of the tire. Luckily having the top of the tire flat isn't usually that noticeable so no one ever complains.

    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

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