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  1. #401
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    The two bearings closest to the sprag clutch do not touch the axle. They separate hub shell from the driver body.
    Really? Why use bearings then? I must be missing something...

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  2. #402
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    Quote Originally Posted by compengr View Post
    Really? Why use bearings then? I must be missing something...

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    They provide for the rotation of hub shell and driver body around the same axis. They transfer rider weight from hub shell to axle bearings while keeping the clutch isolated from it.

  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    They provide for the rotation of hub shell and driver body around the same axis. They transfer rider weight from hub shell to axle bearings while keeping the clutch isolated from it.
    Had to watch the service videos on their site to see how it works . Because of the sprag, the drive shell extends deeper into the hub, much more than a typical ratchet design, leaving less (possible) support for the axle. I get it now.

  4. #404
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    Quote Originally Posted by compengr View Post
    Had to watch the service videos on their site to see how it works . Because of the sprag, the drive shell extends deeper into the hub, much more than a typical ratchet design, leaving less (possible) support for the axle. I get it now.
    Why, the support for the axle is *better* when the two axle bearings are closer to its ends. See the formula for the deflection of a beam with supported ends (dropouts) and two loads (bearings). It benefits (results in smaller values) from multiplying the squared beam length by as small a dimension as possible, and that dimension is the distance between support and nearest load.

  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Why, the support for the axle is *better* when the two axle bearings are closer to its ends. See the formula for the deflection of a beam with supported ends (dropouts) and two loads (bearings). It benefits (results in smaller values) from multiplying the squared beam length by as small a dimension as possible, and that dimension is the distance between support and nearest load.
    When folks start talking formulas, all most people hear is " bla bla bla".

    Not saying you are not intelligent, just saying if you are trying to make a point it's probably going to be missed.



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  6. #406
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. Random Psycho View Post
    Why, the support for the axle is *better* when the two axle bearings are closer to its ends. See the formula for the deflection of a beam with supported ends (dropouts) and two loads (bearings). It benefits (results in smaller values) from multiplying the squared beam length by as small a dimension as possible, and that dimension is the distance between support and nearest load.
    What about the loads from the drive shell?

  7. #407
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    Quote Originally Posted by compengr View Post
    What about the loads from the drive shell?
    The way the axle sees rider's weight, hub shell and drive shell are one part that applies two loads to the axle, in the same direction, and very close to its ends.

  8. #408
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    Mmmmm, Subways...

  9. #409
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I will eventually, will take a while to get back, remember, these are the fat versions.
    I'm in another state right now, so it'll take me some time to get back and get the full story. I was speaking to the prelim information I discussed, so no details, but this sounds similar to what we talked about.
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  10. #410
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    Onyx needs to get a BOOST 20 front hub out to market soon.

  11. #411
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    Onyx needs to get a BOOST 20 front hub out to market soon.
    What's wrong with their 20mm hubs?

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  12. #412
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    Onyx needs to get a BOOST 20 front hub out to market soon.
    We have the 20mm BOOST setup completed in October, for both Centerlock and ISO 6-bolt! Both are available now.

  13. #413
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Gerhardt View Post
    We have the 20mm BOOST setup completed in October, for both Centerlock and ISO 6-bolt! Both are available now.
    Jim, is the "low weight" version of the rear hub still on hold till next year?
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  14. #414
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Gerhardt View Post
    We have the 20mm BOOST setup completed in October, for both Centerlock and ISO 6-bolt! Both are available now.
    Jim, any updates on the new lightweight hubs?

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  15. #415
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    We are very confident that we will release these in the next few months. They have passed our mechanical testing and are currently in the field for some real-world abuse. So far they are performing flawlessly. We will make sure to do an announcement when we have a firm date. Thanks for the question!

  16. #416
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Gerhardt View Post
    We are very confident that we will release these in the next few months. They have passed our mechanical testing and are currently in the field for some real-world abuse. So far they are performing flawlessly. We will make sure to do an announcement when we have a firm date. Thanks for the question!
    Looking forward to seeing more on these! Weight wasn't really an issue (for me), but I wont say no to a lighter component as long as the functionality and reliability don't take a hit


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  17. #417
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    The weight is a large issue for me. I've ridden Onyx hubs and frankly love the way they work, but I'm not willing to add weight to my bicycle when other components essentially do the same job for less weight. I hope they are successfully able to get the weight competitive. Only problem is I already bought some new Wheels and went with 321 hubs.

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  18. #418
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    The weight is a large issue for me.

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    I'm curious what tires you will be running? Hopefully not Minions.
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  19. #419
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    321 hubs are nice. Pricey and no centerlock boost hub for their new G2 model.

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  20. #420
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplemind View Post
    I'm curious what tires you will be running? Hopefully not Minions.
    You are welcome to your opinion.

    I've tried SO many tires, for me, Minions just offer the best compromise between traction. weight, rolling resistance, cost, and wear. They actually make me go faster. IMO, and I've searched, any other tires have me riding slower.

    Hubs, I like the silence, engagement, heck I even really like the sprag wind up that is obvious in an Onyx hub, to me it's like traction control, etc. But faster they will not make me, nor will I clear anything that I couldn't clear before.

    So the Onyx, while very cool, has obvious equivalents that offer great engagement and low rolling resistance, but much lower weight. That's why I currently have 321s.

    If the weight was about the same, I'd prefer the Onyx however.

  21. #421
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    Have you tried dt swiss with the 54poe upgrade and made a comparison? Ive always wondered if the extra poe offered better performance on techy climbs. The dt 350 is such bang for the buck in terms of price and weight. The 322, torch, onyx are sp bling, its tough to resist. Makes my dt swiss very mundane.

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  22. #422
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    Hey Jim, any "projected" target rear hub weight in ISO and CL?

    My inner weight weenie wants to know!

  23. #423
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    Quote Originally Posted by verrocchio100 View Post
    Hey Jim, any "projected" target rear hub weight in ISO and CL?

    My inner weight weenie wants to know!
    I do have some photos I took a while back, these are the Boost versions. We are still trimming here and there, but these weights will probably be pretty close. The updated front hubs will approximately 160g for the ISO 6-bolt boost version.

    Onyx Racing Hubs - Sprag Clutch vs other types of Engagement-img_0870.jpgOnyx Racing Hubs - Sprag Clutch vs other types of Engagement-img_4537.jpgOnyx Racing Hubs - Sprag Clutch vs other types of Engagement-img_7657.jpgOnyx Racing Hubs - Sprag Clutch vs other types of Engagement-img_8797.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Onyx Racing Hubs - Sprag Clutch vs other types of Engagement-img_6127.jpg  

    Last edited by Jim Gerhardt; 5 Days Ago at 01:19 PM.

  24. #424
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    I like the silver color!

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  25. #425
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    Careful, you may start "as machined" trend...

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  26. #426
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    OMG!

    Jim, those look delicious!!

    Any idea if these will roll out (pun intended) before or after SOC?

    And will there be a lighter weight front hub for SuperMax Lefty?

    Thx!

  27. #427
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    We are close, but probably won't happen. The clutch mechanism requires certain design criteria that other hubs don't need. It is a trade off for the benefits it provides. However, we did get the front down to about 160g, so that's a bit lighter than some of our competition and will bring the total set weight a little closer. I don't ever expect to be the lightest, not in the cards, just trying to get it as best as possible while still keeping the reliability up.

  28. #428
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    We just shipped out some pre-production test wheels this week to our best riders. We'll see what they come back with. Trying to get all the little details wrapped up before we start making them in our production runs. Nothing worse then building a bunch and then having to change something later because you got ahead of yourself. We want and need to produce the best we are capable of, lots of great competition out there ya know!

    Nothing has changed on the Lefty hubs, there is not a lot of demand for them and we have to keep to a certain design due to the fork mount, so this really limits the options to reduce weight without looking like a replica.

  29. #429
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    Awesome Jim, thanks to you and your team for pushing the limits!

  30. #430
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I have an engineer friend testing various fat hubs in the cold, including onyx. While they have a great drive mech, according to him, there is little support for the axle by the bearings, other more traditional designs like hope and DT do a much better job here, not sure if this applies outside of the fat hubs, but it was interesting and could be a source of this cracking problem. He was indicating the heavier/more aggressive the rider, the worse this would be.

    I cannot disagree more. To speak about Hope, that I was using on my fatbikes, that was exactly the issue, to much load on the axle, and free wheel hub. Hope has to small bearings and have not enough strenght to hold my my weight (265). After replacing all bearings in the Hope hub, the bearings was more or less grinding after 3-4 rides. The bearings in the free wheel hub get so much load that it after a while blows up. The balls are grinding all metal and then tears it apart. Especially the one bearing closest to hub shell.

    With the Onyx, I have experienced a few years with trouble free riding. Almost without servicing these hubs either. I think it has to do with the exactly that the axle is having big and solid bearings, and three in total, one at each side and one in the middle. The axle is from steel, and the the sprag cluthing are also taking up the energy like it should, locking around the axle. Not like a pawl/rachet system placed on one side of the hub getting twisted on a small surface on the axle.

    The issue with the cracked hub shells comes from aluminum design that have had some issues, I suppose. I have not heard about any fawlt on the steel versions?

  31. #431
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    We have had a few of these axles crack. He is referring to the drive side end of the axle where the drive side nut is tightened on the end of the axle. We haven't had many and we have linked that problem to the nut being or becoming loose. A drop of blue Loctite on the threads has fixes this problem. When that nut wiggles loose or isn't tighten properly, it rocks ever so slightly back and forth, fatiguing the metal and eventually will crack it. Now remember the through bolt is still there supporting and this really doesn't cause anything noticeable unless you take off the wheel, then you see theres a loose piece. We use a 6902 bearing on all our drivers, 28mm od and 15mm id. Others use either a 28mm od x 17mm id or a 6802 which is 24mm x 15mm, or some sort of variant of this. What does this mean? From our testing the load on the bearings is significantly higher with these smaller bearings, causing them to either fail sooner and/or roll less efficiently. The larger balls in the 6902 seem to solve this, however there is a trade-off, they are a little heavier and we have to thread the portion just on the outside (15mm od portion of axle) in order to get our drive cap nut on. Our new lighter hubs address this differently by using press-on end caps like others while still using the 6902 bearing, so no threads in this area, but this too comes with a trade-off, the new hubs will not have the bearing side-load adjustability.

  32. #432
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    I, for one, have little to no issues with my hubs that do not have preload adjustment (i9).

    Agreed, more support with larger bearings is a sound trade off for a little increase in unsprung weight.

    With regards to the weight pix, what are the hub profiles to the according weight?

    Are the flange spacings, flange diameter and flange thickness the same as the current production hubs?

    Or are the flanges beefed up in thickness for spoke support then the edges scalloped for weight reduction?

    Are the spoke holes angled and champfered to relieve spoke contact to flange. I do dislike having the flanges marred by the spokes when I get them rebuilt.

    Thx Jim!

  33. #433
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    The preload adjustment is just a fine tuning feature to gain the smallest advantage out of your hubs.

    They are all boost spacing 148/12 hubs in the photos. Just the Centerlock/ISO/HG/XD combinations of each.

    Flanges are changed a bit to accommodate the weight reducing scalping. We do this for 1. weight and 2. reduction in flange height while still allowing the spokes to be installed easily.
    The flange angle did change a little on this design as well to help deal with the reduction in material, however the spoke hole diameters and such are all the same or very close to current models, so close I don't anticipate spoke length changes to/from same models. We do have hub-specific spoke calculators built into our website (which is about to be updated again). The flanges are angled to reduce spoke contact as well. Thanks for the questions.

  34. #434
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    Will the current design continue to be sold alongside the new design, or will the current design eventually be phased out?

  35. #435
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    Thanks Jim, interesting to see on the Centerlock hubs the non drive flange is smaller in diameter and weigh a bit less than the ISO models, why so?

    Thx!

  36. #436
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    The current design will stay as is and still be offered with all the extras as standard. The new hub design will be a complete model line in itself. We are still deciding on a few things to reduce price on this new line as well. 1. Steel bearings 2. No upgrade program on this line 3. limit colors on end-caps etc. 4. no custom engraving

    These are things we'll have to iron out before production launch, but this hub line will be targeted more towards the mainstream with concerns over weight and cost.

  37. #437
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    The flanges on the iso 6-bolt design need to be taller in order to get the spokes in. On the drive side we are limited to how small this height can be due to the clutch drive system. The disc side on the center lock design has a much smaller diameter so we can reduce the flange height quite a bit. This make all our center lock hubs lighter. In addition, the XD version are lighter then their HG counterparts due to the SRAM design vs the Shimano.

    On the center lock DS flange we reduce the height to save weight and can do so because the NDS flange is smaller yet. On the ISO flanges this is not the case. If we used the same DS flange height as the center lock design we'd have a case where the DS flange is smaller diameter than the NDS, this would amplify the spoke tension imbalance already on wheels, so we keep them the same height to minimize it.

  38. #438
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    Really enjoying the detailed answers you're giving everyone Jim. 👍

  39. #439
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    Awesome info Jim, thanks!

  40. #440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Gerhardt View Post
    We have the 20mm BOOST setup completed in October, for both Centerlock and ISO 6-bolt! Both are available now.
    Good to hear. I emailed you guys late 2017 to get a BOOST 20 CL front hub to match my rear hub and was told they werenít going to be making them anytime soon.

  41. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Gerhardt View Post
    The current design will stay as is and still be offered with all the extras as standard.
    This is great news! I've been worrying the WW, non-adjustable design was going to take over.
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  42. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    You are welcome to your opinion.

    I've tried SO many tires, for me, Minions just offer the best compromise between traction. weight, rolling resistance, cost, and wear. They actually make me go faster. IMO, and I've searched, any other tires have me riding slower.

    If the weight was about the same, I'd prefer the Onyx however.
    I just find it interesting that so many people focus on weight with little regard to where that weight is located. As you know rolling weight, especially weight with the largest moment arm, think centrifugal force, is by far the most critical. If you're swinging that 1000-1200 gm hunk of rubber at the end of that 350mm spoke, that's a whole lot more penalty than 200gms of weight that is essentially not rolling weight located at the center of rotation. The only place I see that extra 200gms of weight causing an issue is possibly with the suspension.
    I run an I9 Torch on another wheelset and I do not detect a difference in weight. What I do notice is the noise and the engagement, both in favor of the Onyx.
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  43. #443
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    Speaking for myself Jim, I pricing isn't the issue for me; I will gladly pay for the performance! Top end offerings are well within the current range that is offered, IMO.

    One vote from me, leave option for ceramic bearing upgrade available.

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    "Good to hear. I emailed you guys late 2017 to get a BOOST 20 CL front hub to match my rear hub and was told they werenít going to be making them anytime soon."


    Things change quickly around here!

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    Quote Originally Posted by verrocchio100 View Post
    Speaking for myself Jim, I pricing isn't the issue for me; I will gladly pay for the performance! Top end offerings are well within the current range that is offered, IMO.

    One vote from me, leave option for ceramic bearing upgrade available.
    Thanks for the input!

  46. #446
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    Quote Originally Posted by verrocchio100 View Post
    Speaking for myself Jim, I pricing isn't the issue for me; I will gladly pay for the performance! Top end offerings are well within the current range that is offered, IMO.

    One vote from me, leave option for ceramic bearing upgrade available.
    Same here.

  47. #447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Gerhardt View Post
    The current design will stay as is and still be offered with all the extras as standard. The new hub design will be a complete model line in itself. We are still deciding on a few things to reduce price on this new line as well. 1. Steel bearings 2. No upgrade program on this line 3. limit colors on end-caps etc. 4. no custom engraving

    These are things we'll have to iron out before production launch, but this hub line will be targeted more towards the mainstream with concerns over weight and cost.
    Jim, thank you for the detailed answers and the insight into your new design! Sounds like you are trying to streamline the process and/or reduce inventory to come up with a more competitive price point for this new hub. I'm all for that! My personal interest is mostly in the silent drive mechanism (sprag clutch). Everything else is less of a priority. My thoughts on the four items you mentioned:
    1. As long as they are reliable, the material makes little difference to me. Having said that, I can see how this could be a desirable feature, especially if the upcharge is minimal.
    2. While I liked the idea at first, realistically, this will probably not be useful to me. Almost without exception, the only time I look for a wheelset is when I'm putting together a new bike...which means the old set of wheels is being sold with the old bike.
    3. By limited do you mean one color? Not really an issue for me if it's something like anodized black or clear.
    4. Wasn't aware this was an option. Kind of a cool way to do something special, but it would be low on the priority list for me.

  48. #448
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simplemind View Post
    I just find it interesting that so many people focus on weight with little regard to where that weight is located.
    Sure, where the weight is located matters, but overall weight does too. Think about this for a while, it's not just your wheels that are accelerating forwards and backwards, you are turning, you are going up and down. Lifting your bike several thousand feet requires lots of upwards accelerations, in addition to forward accelerations, pretty much constantly. Every pedal stroke is an acceleration because you can't maintain constant output. Wrenching the bike left and right is acceleration. With all of these, the mass is important. In some conditions/trails, I can go ride a very lightweight bike and just keep clicking out the miles because the entire system of the bike is lightweight and doesn't affect me nearly as much as the alternative. When you start adding heavier parts, heavier carnks, hubs, rims, bars, add some more suspension or less efficiency, it starts to bog down and it takes a toll. When you are building a lightweight bike for racing purposes, you simply can not compromise or you are at least severely limited in your ability to do so, as far as component selection. If I want to run a dropper, it adds weight and I have to look for somewhere else to drop some off. I totally get that people may be willing to make these sacrifices in some areas, like people that go with CK or Onyx hubs, but think about the flipside too, if you are building a go-fast bike and trying to do so to improve results, you try to line up as many things in your favor as possible, from the bike weight and performance to your hydration to your clothing (and yes, reliability is one of those things too!). Again, you are extremely limited in the compromises you can make in this pursuit. Some of us consider it to be fun because we put in a lot of effort and time riding and we get to see these results and we make little tweaks here and there. A good product will sell, especially if it fills a niche like heavyweight/extreme torque applications, a significantly heavier hub won't be for everyone either though and it's also fun to ride a light bike in my experience.
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  49. #449
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    The "racing" part in Onyx Racing is meant for the gated start events, I think.


    FWIW, with more time dedicated to riding, I found myself increasing weight of some components (frame, fork, crankset, stem, rear hub, going back to steel bolts everywhere) and decreasing rotating weight (tubes, tires). This way I spend less time working on bike, and the onset of fatigue cracking in critical parts is delayed or even prevented.
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  50. #450
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Gerhardt View Post
    The current design will stay as is and still be offered with all the extras as standard. The new hub design will be a complete model line in itself. We are still deciding on a few things to reduce price on this new line as well. 1. Steel bearings 2. No upgrade program on this line 3. limit colors on end-caps etc. 4. no custom engraving

    These are things we'll have to iron out before production launch, but this hub line will be targeted more towards the mainstream with concerns over weight and cost.
    Any upgrade to the sealing on the newer (and old) hubs?"Freehub" labyrinth seal is VERY good but feel the end bearings could be sealed better. My Hope Pro II outer bearings are sealed very well and lasted 4+ years.

  51. #451
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    Streamlining our production is a constant moving target, so we are always trying to improve on that. When I stated limited, it was referring to the end cap color choices (probably just do black as they are not seen that much anyway) and other value added services like free laser etching (will be hard to do on the new design), etc.
    I'm sure we will make ceramic bearings an upgrade charge.


    Quote Originally Posted by compengr View Post
    Jim, thank you for the detailed answers and the insight into your new design! Sounds like you are trying to streamline the process and/or reduce inventory to come up with a more competitive price point for this new hub. I'm all for that! My personal interest is mostly in the silent drive mechanism (sprag clutch). Everything else is less of a priority. My thoughts on the four items you mentioned:
    1. As long as they are reliable, the material makes little difference to me. Having said that, I can see how this could be a desirable feature, especially if the upcharge is minimal.
    2. While I liked the idea at first, realistically, this will probably not be useful to me. Almost without exception, the only time I look for a wheelset is when I'm putting together a new bike...which means the old set of wheels is being sold with the old bike.
    3. By limited do you mean one color? Not really an issue for me if it's something like anodized black or clear.
    4. Wasn't aware this was an option. Kind of a cool way to do something special, but it would be low on the priority list for me.

  52. #452
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    As you stated there are many factors to be considered when building a bike, weight is defiantly one of them. However based on test that have been done by reputable third parties, performance seems to be the most heavily weighted (no pun intended). So lighter doesn't mean more efficient or faster. See attached study provided by Duke University. https://www.dropbox.com/s/cs2g251nz9...ndown.pdf?dl=0

    Now if you're talking feel of a bike due to weight that is entirely user preference and I'd agree 100% with you.

    As a rider I too appreciate the many different options of products available to tweak my bikes. I personally can't tell the difference in the weight of the rear hub from another but other many notice the grams. It's all good input for us though and appreciate your comments!


    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Sure, where the weight is located matters, but overall weight does too. Think about this for a while, it's not just your wheels that are accelerating forwards and backwards, you are turning, you are going up and down. Lifting your bike several thousand feet requires lots of upwards accelerations, in addition to forward accelerations, pretty much constantly. Every pedal stroke is an acceleration because you can't maintain constant output. Wrenching the bike left and right is acceleration. With all of these, the mass is important. In some conditions/trails, I can go ride a very lightweight bike and just keep clicking out the miles because the entire system of the bike is lightweight and doesn't affect me nearly as much as the alternative. When you start adding heavier parts, heavier carnks, hubs, rims, bars, add some more suspension or less efficiency, it starts to bog down and it takes a toll. When you are building a lightweight bike for racing purposes, you simply can not compromise or you are at least severely limited in your ability to do so, as far as component selection. If I want to run a dropper, it adds weight and I have to look for somewhere else to drop some off. I totally get that people may be willing to make these sacrifices in some areas, like people that go with CK or Onyx hubs, but think about the flipside too, if you are building a go-fast bike and trying to do so to improve results, you try to line up as many things in your favor as possible, from the bike weight and performance to your hydration to your clothing (and yes, reliability is one of those things too!). Again, you are extremely limited in the compromises you can make in this pursuit. Some of us consider it to be fun because we put in a lot of effort and time riding and we get to see these results and we make little tweaks here and there. A good product will sell, especially if it fills a niche like heavyweight/extreme torque applications, a significantly heavier hub won't be for everyone either though and it's also fun to ride a light bike in my experience.

  53. #453
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    Sure thing, we modified the cinch nut on the non-drive side to have a flat o-ring seal, this can be easily adapted to your current hub. The drive side is a little more difficult to seal without adding a lot of resistance (heavy seal/grease on driver bearing). We are working on a better sealing bearing that will allow similar performance to the current mid-seal we use now.

    It is always an option to clean and repack the bearings with a thicker grease (not the clutches, just the bearings). This will provide a longer maintenance period, but will reduce the efficiency. See our youtube channel for details on how to perform this.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzn...tXT7ZGuGFujPnA

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron1017 View Post
    Any upgrade to the sealing on the newer (and old) hubs?"Freehub" labyrinth seal is VERY good but feel the end bearings could be sealed better. My Hope Pro II outer bearings are sealed very well and lasted 4+ years.

  54. #454
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    Hey Jim, just a thought from an end user with no background in design how about o-ring seals sandwiched between mating surfaces to prevent water/debris intrusion?

    Since the hub surfaces are CNC or EDM, would there need to be a vast change in line code to make a channel for an o-ring seal like on the end caps and not on the edge?

    Or another avenue would be to allow better draining so when cleaing the bike, the water can carry the debris away rather than letting the crap accrue.

    I see a lot more sealing structures within fishing reels than ever before and even more areas to allow drainage, so thats where me comments come from.

    However, I could be talking just a bunch of nonsense.

  55. #455
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    Thanks for the input, we'll have to turn up a test piece and see. I think we all agree the labyrinth seal is best when it can be used as it provides little to no friction and has excellent sealing properties. Your first idea is something we discussed before and is doable, just haven't tried it yet. It would require a custom o-ring. I'm not so sure on your second comment about easier draining, this seems like a design like this would also lend itself to easier debris access as well, since most of the time a bike hub is subject to small sand and other dirt particles as well as the liquids. We will take a look at some of those fishing reels! Thanks!

  56. #456
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    The draining is a double edge sword Jim. Good to keep the water/debris out but still need to keep things clean. The best sealed reels I have worked on are made by Shimano/Daiwa/Okuma; as a tangent.

    As for bearings, I know the much preferred Enduro Bearings; however, here's another option and my 2 cents worth:

    https://www.bocabearings.com/product...&ProductType=2

    Mod's strike the post if inappropriate to link to another site.

    BTW, the blue ano'd CL hub is svelte!

  57. #457
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    Jim is right about hard particles being always introduced with water. These are a *much* bigger concern than water. Modern general purpose greases can absorb some water and still perform, but grit is the scourge.
    26" rigid SS 4130 BB7 nylon-flats ESI latex-tubes non-lubricated-8spd

  58. #458
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    As a trade-off between increased friction and a practical contaminant seal, I subscribe to a modest light grease on the seal and hub contact points. Slick Honey or freehub grease work well in my personal experience.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  59. #459
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    Jim, will there be a Boost Single Speed specific version of the new lightened hub? Fingers crossed.

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