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Thread: NOX Composites?

  1. #801
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    No worries, thanks for the reply.
    I will weigh them in a couple of weeks when i receive them.
    Looking to run 2.3 to 2.5 tires on them but save the weight over the farlow.

  2. #802
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    Not exactly the same build (Kitsuma, Boost and center-lock i9 Torch, and Lazer spokes) but my actually weights (with tape) are:

    F: 769g
    R: 906g

    After about a year on them (my second set), I have zero complaints. Fit/finish, durability, performance, etc. are all awesome - esp. considering the price.

  3. #803
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    I wanted to give a shoutout to Nox and their awesome warranty and customer service. I built up a new bike in late March and decided to upgrade from my regular Chinese carbon wheels to some Nox Farlows to support a local company. I was stoked on the final product, and gutted when on my third ride on the wheels I completely destroyed the rear with a sharp edged rock hit. I called Nox the next day (Monday) to ask about a crash replacement and told them I would be in their area that weekend to ride. They told me to send them the wheel for warranty evaluation. They had it built up for me that Friday morning and covered all parts under their rim strike warranty, only charging me for the labor for the rebuild. Hands down some of the best customer service I've experienced in a while.

  4. #804
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    industry nine and nox.

    These were built for my new foes trail mixer.
    Front hub i9 torch boost CL with i9 spokes laced to 29" Nox teocali rim.
    Rear hub i9 torch boost CL with i9 spokes laced to Nox teocali 27.5 rim.

    Valves installed but no rim tape.
    Couldn't find these weights listed anywhere so thought i would post them.
    740 front.
    810 rear

    NOX Composites?-img_1456.jpgNOX Composites?-img_1458.jpg

  5. #805
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    NOX has the best overall product imo.

    There is a set of NOX Kitsuma 29ers on Boost I9s for sale here:

    Set of NOX Kitsuma 29er (carbon fiber 35 mm) w/ I9 boost hubs ID - Buy and Sell Mountain Bikes and Accessories

  6. #806
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    NOX has the best overall product imo.

    There is a set of NOX Kitsuma 29ers on Boost I9s for sale here:

    Set of NOX Kitsuma 29er (carbon fiber 35 mm) w/ I9 boost hubs ID - Buy and Sell Mountain Bikes and Accessories
    Not biased at all considering you're trying sell a set
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  7. #807
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    Yes they are mine. They are great wheels and the lifetime warranty really shows the confidence NOX has in them.

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  8. #808
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Yes they are mine. They are great wheels and the lifetime warranty really shows the confidence NOX has in them.

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    Lifetime crash replacement, 2 year warranty.
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  9. #809
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    Hey guys, I'm bringing back a few-month older thread with some questions:

    The current weights on the Nox website show the Teocalli 29 wheels at 1479 grams with the I9 hubs. But a September 2017 review on MTBR and shows the wheelset with the same hubs at 1600 grams:

    Nox Teocalli carbon wheels review - Mtbr.com

    Are the weights on the Nox website exaggerated, or have they refined the design recently to make them lighter? There is always a little variation, but advertising 1489 and actually weighing out at 1600 is quite a jump, even if different spokes were used...

    I'm looking at the Skyline 29 and the Teocalli 29 for my Niner RKT 9 RDO. My bike has 90mm of travel in the rear, and a 120mm fork. As a cross-country guy, I like to keep my wheels on the ground, I'm not jumping anything or doing anything crazy. But in Utah there can be some single track that dips through rock gardens of shale and its nice to have confidence that your wheels will hold up. I'd also like to run a 2.35" tire up front, and that might be pushing it with the 23mm Skyline. Any recommendations? The Teo might give the option of running an even wider tire like a 2.4 or maybe a 2.5, which probably wouldn't happen often for me, but might be a good option for the rare Moab trip. I mainly ride cross country and do a few races a year, climbing is my the focus on the steeps around these parts, but the shale-ridden trails of Park City also give me pause.

    I'm also looking at the Enve ($$$$) and Reynolds ($$$). The Enve is advertising that their wide bead really helps prevent pinch flats and thus comfortably allows lower tire pressures and lighter tires without sidewall protection. How much truth is in that marketing pitch? The Enve M525s are 33.5mm external, 25mm internal, so doing the math that means 8.5mm total of bead width, so each bead is 4.25mm. The Nox Teo and Skylines have a total 6mm of bead width, so each bead is 3mm. They Reynolds have even thinner beads with their XC259 measuring 30 external and 25mm internal width. Any thoughts appreciated.

  10. #810
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    Well I just had a set of teo's built for my foes trailmixer. The front is 29" teo and a i9 torch 110 boost hub with 32 i9 spokes and weighs in at 810 grams with rim tape and valve stem. The rear is a 27.5 teo on boost hub and 32 i9 spokes and weighed in at 740 grams. Love these wheels.

  11. #811
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Boz View Post
    Hey guys, I'm bringing back a few-month older thread with some questions:

    The current weights on the Nox website show the Teocalli 29 wheels at 1479 grams with the I9 hubs. But a September 2017 review on MTBR and shows the wheelset with the same hubs at 1600 grams:

    Nox Teocalli carbon wheels review - Mtbr.com

    Are the weights on the Nox website exaggerated, or have they refined the design recently to make them lighter? There is always a little variation, but advertising 1489 and actually weighing out at 1600 is quite a jump, even if different spokes were used...

    I'm looking at the Skyline 29 and the Teocalli 29 for my Niner RKT 9 RDO. My bike has 90mm of travel in the rear, and a 120mm fork. As a cross-country guy, I like to keep my wheels on the ground, I'm not jumping anything or doing anything crazy. But in Utah there can be some single track that dips through rock gardens of shale and its nice to have confidence that your wheels will hold up. I'd also like to run a 2.35" tire up front, and that might be pushing it with the 23mm Skyline. Any recommendations? The Teo might give the option of running an even wider tire like a 2.4 or maybe a 2.5, which probably wouldn't happen often for me, but might be a good option for the rare Moab trip. I mainly ride cross country and do a few races a year, climbing is my the focus on the steeps around these parts, but the shale-ridden trails of Park City also give me pause.

    I'm also looking at the Enve ($$$$) and Reynolds ($$$). The Enve is advertising that their wide bead really helps prevent pinch flats and thus comfortably allows lower tire pressures and lighter tires without sidewall protection. How much truth is in that marketing pitch? The Enve M525s are 33.5mm external, 25mm internal, so doing the math that means 8.5mm total of bead width, so each bead is 4.25mm. The Nox Teo and Skylines have a total 6mm of bead width, so each bead is 3mm. They Reynolds have even thinner beads with their XC259 measuring 30 external and 25mm internal width. Any thoughts appreciated.
    I'd call NOX directly and ask. As far as ENVE's, long story but I cracked (2) of their rims at the bead. It was the older design but more importantly, they refused to honor their warranty. That is when I switched to NOX and in my opinion, they are the best carbon wheels out there.
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  12. #812
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Boz View Post
    Hey guys, I'm bringing back a few-month older thread with some questions:

    The current weights on the Nox website show the Teocalli 29 wheels at 1479 grams with the I9 hubs. But a September 2017 review on MTBR and shows the wheelset with the same hubs at 1600 grams:

    Nox Teocalli carbon wheels review - Mtbr.com

    Are the weights on the Nox website exaggerated, or have they refined the design recently to make them lighter? There is always a little variation, but advertising 1489 and actually weighing out at 1600 is quite a jump, even if different spokes were used...

    I'm looking at the Skyline 29 and the Teocalli 29 for my Niner RKT 9 RDO. My bike has 90mm of travel in the rear, and a 120mm fork. As a cross-country guy, I like to keep my wheels on the ground, I'm not jumping anything or doing anything crazy. But in Utah there can be some single track that dips through rock gardens of shale and its nice to have confidence that your wheels will hold up. I'd also like to run a 2.35" tire up front, and that might be pushing it with the 23mm Skyline. Any recommendations? The Teo might give the option of running an even wider tire like a 2.4 or maybe a 2.5, which probably wouldn't happen often for me, but might be a good option for the rare Moab trip. I mainly ride cross country and do a few races a year, climbing is my the focus on the steeps around these parts, but the shale-ridden trails of Park City also give me pause.

    I'm also looking at the Enve ($$$$) and Reynolds ($$$). The Enve is advertising that their wide bead really helps prevent pinch flats and thus comfortably allows lower tire pressures and lighter tires without sidewall protection. How much truth is in that marketing pitch? The Enve M525s are 33.5mm external, 25mm internal, so doing the math that means 8.5mm total of bead width, so each bead is 4.25mm. The Nox Teo and Skylines have a total 6mm of bead width, so each bead is 3mm. They Reynolds have even thinner beads with their XC259 measuring 30 external and 25mm internal width. Any thoughts appreciated.
    Have you looked Light Bicycle as well?
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  13. #813
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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    Well I just had a set of teo's built for my foes trailmixer. The front is 29" teo and a i9 torch 110 boost hub with 32 i9 spokes and weighs in at 810 grams with rim tape and valve stem. The rear is a 27.5 teo on boost hub and 32 i9 spokes and weighed in at 740 grams. Love these wheels.
    If you were running both wheels 29, that would definitely be an over 1620 gram set, not close to their advertised 1489 grams for the Teocalli wheels.

    Both Enve and Nox have great crash warranties if and only if you are the original purchaser. But thanks for the testimonial on Nox wheels. Everyone I know that rides them loves them, so that says a LOT.

    I have looked at Light Bicycle, I want to stay with a company that at least has their headquarters/customer service in the U.S.

    What I'm thinking right now is that the Skylines might be just a touch too narrow, and the Teos are a bit heavy. And the Enve and Reynolds are just too damn expensive. I need to decide what is more important...

  14. #814
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    Hi Boz,

    I believe that wheelset used on the review you link was built with doubled-butted Sapim Race spokes, which are significantly heavier than the CX-Ray spokes we use on most of our builds and the spokes used for the weights published on our website. A 32h wheelset is about 100g difference between the two. That, combined with the weight of the valve and tape and there is your difference in weight.

    You may be confused with what bead width means in this context. "Bead width" as used here means the inside to inside width of the rim, not the width bead lip itself. The width of the bead lip has no bearing on tire shape. You are correct that our bead lip is 3mm, which was is a bit wider than most to provide strength and resistance to occasional rock strikes.

    Thanks guys!
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  15. #815
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    Nox Teocalli 29 28H
    DT Swiss 240S Straight Pull Boost 110 / 148
    Sapim D-Light
    Sapim Alu Polyax nipples
    Weight without valves / rim tape : 1469g.

    Impossible to achieve this weight with Industry Nine Torch hubs, worst hubs in the industry. I had a pair laced to Nox Skyline 29's : bearings of the rear hub toasted after 750 miles (water + dirt), replacement bearing after 300 miles. There is so much drag in the rear hub that on my Eagle cassette with the chain on the 10 - 16T sprocket, the crank just turns when pushing the bike. Same when the bike is in the bikestand for a wash : pedal backwards and the rear wheel just spins up.

    I really love those wheels, best set so far. I do have to say that I just ordered a pair of Carbon-Ti X-Hubs SP 32H, Sapim CX-Ray and Duke Lucky Jack SLS rims, which would be +/- 1230g at 25.6 internal width. Rims are from what I heard from my wheel builder made at the same factory.

    NOX Composites?-igbnalphegeolfcd.jpg

    NOX Composites?-blpacebnmhehembg.jpg

  16. #816
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    All else equal, a Teocalli wheel is only 40g heavier than a Skyline wheel. You could always do a 28h Teocalli build and that brings you quite close to the 32h Skyline build.

    The Teocalli outsells the Skyline by a significant margin. 26mm is a great width for the majority of riders riding the majority of popular 2.25-2.35 tires.
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  17. #817
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    All the wheel sets I've had made by Nox are pretty much dead-on what their advertised weights were. Don't remember all the numbers but I've had 2 Kitsuma 27.5 sets, a Skyline 29 set, a Teo 29 set and a Teo/Skyline combo made and all sets were within 30 grams grams of what was stated. Great wheels, too.
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  18. #818
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Boz View Post
    I have looked at Light Bicycle, I want to stay with a company that at least has their headquarters/customer service in the U.S.
    They do:
    https://us.lightbicycle.com/
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  19. #819
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    My experience with the i9 hubs are very different then what you have had. This is my second set and I have just under 1500 miles on them and they are still perfect and I also run the eagle cassette and do not seem to have the drag issues you stated. That being said YMMV.
    I'm very happy with my second set as my first set I sold to friend who is still running them trouble free. I weigh 190 and ride semi aggressive on a 6" trail bike for what it's worth. Also I had my weights backwards, if you look back a few post you can see the pics I posted on the scale.

  20. #820
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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    My experience with the i9 hubs are very different then what you have had. This is my second set and I have just under 1500 miles on them and they are still perfect and I also run the eagle cassette and do not seem to have the drag issues you stated. That being said YMMV.
    I'm very happy with my second set as my first set I sold to friend who is still running them trouble free. I weigh 190 and ride semi aggressive on a 6" trail bike for what it's worth. Also I had my weights backwards, if you look back a few post you can see the pics I posted on the scale.
    I had the same experience as madcow above with Industry 9 bearings which is especially surprising since I live in the dry climate of SoCal. The good news of that equation is the shop just had to make a call and I9 sent new bearing for free. A friend of mine also had the same repeated issues, I think you're the lucky one.
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  21. #821
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    Do you think it's i9's bearings and could another brand of bearings work better and last longer..?
    If mine start to fail I'd rather replace them with something better.

  22. #822
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    Quote Originally Posted by fxr man View Post
    Do you think it's i9's bearings and could another brand of bearings work better and last longer..?
    If mine start to fail I'd rather replace them with something better.
    3 guys had a problem, I wouldn't worry about. First I9 doesn't make the bearings, they get them from Enduro which are very well known in the industry and have a rep that goes with it. In any manufacturing there are going to be Lemons.

    If this was an issue, there'd be a 1000 post thread about it, just look at the Sram Guide/heat debacle.
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  23. #823
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoxComposites View Post
    All else equal, a Teocalli wheel is only 40g heavier than a Skyline wheel. You could always do a 28h Teocalli build and that brings you quite close to the 32h Skyline build.

    The Teocalli outsells the Skyline by a significant margin. 26mm is a great width for the majority of riders riding the majority of popular 2.25-2.35 tires.

    Well I pulled the trigger on a pair of 32 hole Teocallis. I'll report back in a few weeks! I like the idea of a wider rim that is stronger to handle the occasional spill or bad line throug a rock garden, the 26mm Teos seem just right for XC use and the occasional race. I also looked at the Light Bicycle wheels, they make a 24mm and a 28mm, I didnít see anything in between, but I just really liked Noxís warranty and lifetime crash replacement program so that won me over.
    Last edited by The Boz; 02-13-2018 at 06:03 AM.

  24. #824
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    3 guys had a problem, I wouldn't worry about. First I9 doesn't make the bearings, they get them from Enduro which are very well known in the industry and have a rep that goes with it. In any manufacturing there are going to be Lemons.

    If this was an issue, there'd be a 1000 post thread about it, just look at the Sram Guide/heat debacle.
    Do some research... I9 hubs are notorious for poor bearings (and yes, I have first hand experience) and they point the finger at Enduro while Enduro points the finger back at I9 (I've had discussions with both about the problem). Either way the tolerances are getting out of whack and it has been a long-standing issue with their hubs. As others have stated, I9's customer service is excellent so they will fix the issue. It is interesting to note that Chris King went thru this little game until they finally had enough and now have ALL of their bearings made IN HOUSE. You just don't hear about any bearing related issues with their hubs. Coincidence??? I think not. But, hey... believe what you want!

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  25. #825
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    It's funny, after having a couple sets of NOX rims that are 30mm internal width, I could never imagine going with anything less. Traction, extra comfort, more rigidity, etc. Just love the wider rims. But the main reason for my visit is that after reading all these recent posts, I realized that I am going on 3 years with my Farlow/Chris King 29er wheels! I ride a minimum of 50 miles per week on very aggressive single track with lots of rocks and jumps. My rims only have a few knicks and scratches, and have never needed re-truing. Wheel set was 800g front/950g rear. +/- 50g for additional tape and sealant. I always run 32 spokes since I'm well over 200#. I recently built up a new set of Nextie 40mm (external) wheels on Hopes but in 27.5 size. I love the way the 40s give my Ardent 2.4s a wider (but still round) profile. I will say however, they were not as easy to build up as the NOX. The NOX were easier to true and came into roundness easier. The finish was a lot nicer on the NOX, and the angles of the spokes going into the nipples was much less drastic as compared to the Nextie. The assymetric drilling of the NOX rims is a beautiful thing! Both wheels have been doing great, but there's just something about my NOX set that makes them my favorite. I'd easily put these up against an ENVE set.
    It was love at first sight.... she had alloy nipples after all!

  26. #826
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    Chris King went thru this little game until they finally had enough and now have ALL of their bearings made IN HOUSE. You just don't hear about any bearing related issues with their hubs. Coincidence??? I think not. But, hey... believe what you want!
    Do you even need to service King components?! Just kidding, but seriously, I never have to service my King hubs. I've taken them apart to inspect them and the grease still looks new and everything is smooth as a baby's bottom.
    It was love at first sight.... she had alloy nipples after all!

  27. #827
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    Enduro bearings are middle of the road. I've gone down that road before, and have moved on.

    If you want something truly set and forget, get actual, authentic NTN or NSK bearings.

    If anyone wants some cheap Enduro 6802s, holler at me. I've got 6 of them I'd sell for $20 total, shipped.

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  28. #828
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    NOX Farlow

    LOVING my NOX Farlow's builit up with Project 321 hubs. Not overly harsh and absolutely rail!

  29. #829
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Enduro bearings are middle of the road. I've gone down that road before, and have moved on.

    If you want something truly set and forget, get actual, authentic NTN or NSK bearings.

    If anyone wants some cheap Enduro 6802s, holler at me. I've got 6 of them I'd sell for $20 total, shipped.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Totally agree with you about the Enduro bearings!! Middle of the road if that! I use all Phil Wood bearings. NTN bearings With Phil Wood grease inside and Phil Wood designed outer seals. They definitely are little pricey
    But worth it in my book. Another good Bearing is the Bearing that project 321 now uses and Hadley black seal Japanese bearing. Enduro is the reason project 321 switched to the black seal Japanese brand. I like my Nox Teocalli rims but Definitely the most Flexey of all my six sets of carbon rims. My light bicycle rims that I was using for cross country 28 mm wide with straight pull DT Swiss hubs weighing in at 1378g was my favorite light set of wheels, Sold them to a friend who is still using them with not a problem. I use the Nox Teo now for cross country with Project 321 hubs. My derby rims Are the most stiff with onyx hubs. I now have three sets of Light Bicycle rims and will only use them in the future. Itís a no-brainer for me !!

  30. #830
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    Hi all, just making sure you are all aware that we are giving away a custom-built wheelset on March 31. Be sure and sign up for your virtual raffle tickets here: https://goo.gl/forms/1WPFmdHk5lKwXNUY2

    Bonus tickets can be obtained by participating in our #noxonehitwonder challenge. Check out our facebook or Instragram feeds for more info. facebook.com/NoxComposites
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  31. #831
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    Update: I ended up going with Knight Composites and really like those. I did use NOX on my Cross bike and they clearly told me over two calls and a follow-up call after I was having issues the rims were for tubeless. That is why I was looking at NOX again. Well, it turns out that the A36D rims I used on my Cross bike, are clearly not a good tubeless design. Any tire from 25-40, simply falls away from the bead if deflated enough. That was annoying enough for me to get the Knight rims this time. So now I need to get new rims for my Cross bike that are TRULY tubeless...maybe 19-21 internal width. I'm still annoyed I got suckered in by those dumb A36Ds.

    So I got the Knights for my SB4.5 (26 internal width) and they works superbly for my 2.35 tires. I would not go any wider for that tire size.

  32. #832
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    Hey Flyer, When using a tire width somewhat close to the rim width (25mm on a 20mm) it's no surprise a deflated tire would have a tendency to fall away from the bead. This is because the majority of 25mm tires have a natural bead width less than 20mm. If we changed the drop channel width/shape to compensate for this effect, you'd have a really hard time mounting the tires. The solution is simple, just add a layer of tape to achieve the tightness you prefer. We designed the road/cx rims to keep the BSD on the lower edge of the ISO spec and have a drop channel width such that you can mount tires by hand (on the side of the road for example). Also, remember than unlike mountain tubeless, most road/cx users need to run 2+ layers of tape anyway to deal with higher air pressures. So if you want (or need) a tighter fit with the particular tire you are running, just add a layer of tape (each layer adds about 10mils to the BSD and weighs only about 2g). On the other hand, if you are racing cross and want a wide rim platform and ultra lightweight, tubulars really are the way to go (check out the Zolder rim).
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  33. #833
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    Sadly, I had mentioned that this was for a Tarmac road build when I called, and I'd be using 25 Schwalbe Pro Ones. Now they are on my Cross bike with 40 Gravelkings...they will still fall away but I'm meticulous about replacing sealant, checking my tires, carrying tubes, and carrying a frame pump on my gravel rides. I guess that rim was not designed with a ridge or shelf, like most tubeless rims now are. I have used two layers of tape before giving up on the road bike. They now have 40 Gravekings on. Just need to eventually replace them with a rim/wheelset that has a shelf or ridge profile. Thanks for the tips.

  34. #834
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoxComposites View Post
    Hi all, just making sure you are all aware that we are giving away a custom-built wheelset on March 31. Be sure and sign up for your virtual raffle tickets here: https://goo.gl/forms/1WPFmdHk5lKwXNUY2

    Bonus tickets can be obtained by participating in our #noxonehitwonder challenge. Check out our facebook or Instragram feeds for more info. facebook.com/NoxComposites
    Do you know how hard it is for a 58 year old Dude to try and make up Rap lines? I did it but it made me cringe just a bit.

  35. #835
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    Last edited by SpeedyChix; 4 Weeks Ago at 06:36 PM.

  36. #836
    mtbr member
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    Dec 2014
    Posts
    145
    I've owned some Teocallis in the past.. They were priced decent and were a solid set of wheels. Fast forward about 3 years, I went to buy a 2nd set for my new bike and they increased their pricing by quite a bit. There's nothing that special about NOX wheels and their decals are cheap/ugly. I felt like it was a budget friendly asian made carbon wheel with a NOX decal on it. Not sure why they increased pricing so much.. Went with NOBL this time, their pricing was much more reasonable and the baked on water line decals give it a much higher quality look.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails NOX Composites?-sb52.6.jpg  

    NOX Composites?-yeti0.jpg  


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