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  1. #1
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    New On One "Smorgasbord" tyre...

    Bought one the other day from Brant of On One at the Wiggle Mountain Mayhem. This is a brand new tyre design, just launched by On One, made for them by Maxxis.



    This is a pic of it on a Mavic EN521 rim (21mm internal width), it's got quite a round profile, certainly more than some tyres I'm used to, probably wise to run it on a wide rim... Comparing it to a 2.25" Crossmark I also have, the carcass seems identical, but the centre knobs on the Smorgasbord are more pronounced, and the side knobs of lower height.

    Put it on the front of my full sus tonight, will give it a ride out soon. Will see how it goes, but suspect it might be a better rear tyre than front due to the profile.

    It's definitely well made though (as you would expect from Maxxis), I've got the 60a version rather than the dual compound version but then again I've never had a problem with a 60a Maxxis before (only the hard 70a versions), and the tread looks well designed so it should both roll well and hook up nicely in varied conditions hopefully. Their pricing is keen too, they are (or will be) charging 19.99 for the single compound version, or 29.99 for the dual compound.

    Weight is 800g bang on the nose on my scales, not light but then it's more of alternative to say a 2.35" Minion DHF than say a 2.25" Nobby Nic. Should convert tubeless quite well too I reckon being a Maxxis.

    Will report after I've ridden it...

  2. #2
    Mountain Man Dan
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    Grip on the rear looks great, but doesn't look to good for cornering. There are big gaps that aren't filled in with some type of tread. Might work well for something loamy?....but then again, seems a little too round for that and the side knobs aren't pronounced enough.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProjectDan35 View Post
    Grip on the rear looks great, but doesn't look to good for cornering. There are big gaps that aren't filled in with some type of tread. Might work well for something loamy?....but then again, seems a little too round for that and the side knobs aren't pronounced enough.
    Here's what @shiggy says.

    Created with UK and Pacific Northwest riding in mind the Smorgasbord offers performance in a wide range of conditions world wide.

    Unique tread elements for drive and braking grip, directional stability, control, and cornering, and positioned for optimal negative space, work together to create a tire that can take you almost anywhere.

    Drive/braking: A central paddle block gives superior straight line grip for forward drive and braking. More stable over roots and square edged rocks.

    Directional stability: Three tread element form an arrow pointing in the direction of rotation. A "point" block keeps the tire on center and rolling well, followed by a pair of offset blocks forming a middle channel and stable footprint. Leading and trailing edges and generous spacing keep the drive/braking grip high and latch onto square edges.

    Cornering: Large well supported edge blocks form a squirm free cornering platform. Spaced far enough apart to clear mud and close enough for dry conditions. Small transition blocks provide feedback to the rider when leaning into the turns.

    Negative space: This is where the grip happens on soft and loose surfaces. The tread needs to penetrate the surface, then trap and control the ground between the blocks. Great care was given to how the Smorgasbord tread flows between the knobs to hold the ground.

    Working edges: The outer edges of the knobs do the work on soft surfaces. On harder surfaces the face of the blocks come into play. Broad blocks are more stable but can slide on roots and loose over hardpack. Adding sipes and raised curbs add working edges for better traction. The deeper sipes make the block more flexible, adding to its ability to grip in various conditions. Also allows the use of a longer wearing 60a rubber compound in the center with little compromise in traction on the Enduro model, whilst those well supported edge blocks allow a soft 42a compound, for the Trail Extreme version, without squirm of chunking.

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by ProjectDan35 View Post
    Grip on the rear looks great, but doesn't look to good for cornering. There are big gaps that aren't filled in with some type of tread. Might work well for something loamy?....but then again, seems a little too round for that and the side knobs aren't pronounced enough.
    The gaps are what gives the tire cornering grip, and they are not as huge as they seem in the OP's pic. Captures the loose stuff, and the broad well supported edge blocks hold on firmer surfaces.

    Transition to the edge blocks and feedback is good. I have been riding the 29" is wet to slightly loose dry conditions with roots, ruts, berms and off cambers. Mounted on a 28mm rim front and a 24mm rear.
    Slight adjustment period and then I railed the twisty singletrack, with better than most climbing grip and great braking.
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  5. #5
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    What's the actual size?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shapirus View Post
    What's the actual size?
    See full works drawing here:-
    Smorgasbord - what does it take to make a tyre? - shedfire's dumping ground

    (55/58)

  7. #7
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    Here's my first impressions...

    Just got back from my first ride using this tyre.



    (photo for proof! )

    Haven't ridden it that far yet, just one ride of a couple of hours, but the Malverns is covered in pretty steep and varied surfaces. It's a good testing ground to find a tyres weakspots.

    Before I go into further detail, I have to say that the tyre is definitely tall and quite "pinched" for its size, on my 521 rim which isn't exactly narrow it comes up narrower than a 2.25" Maxxis Crossmark but also noticably taller. It's not as tall and round as an old WTB 2.4" Motoraptor for instance (if you remember those), but I usually prefer a slightly squarer tyre... That said, here's some observations...

    Pro's

    -Maxxis 60a rubber compound is grippy and predictable
    -Only run on the front so far, but seems pretty quick rolling, will report back again when it's been on the back
    -Braking grip is very good, you'll rip the valves off your inner tubes or boil your brakes before this lets go
    -Very good on firm/hardpack/rocky off camber sections. There's a section on a trail I ride that I've only ever cleared once before (Black Chili Rubber Queen up front), this stuck to it like a fly to fly paper, and I've only got the single compound 60a tyre

    Cons

    -There is no edge bite in softer ground. And I mean none. The side knobbles are too shallow for any meaningful grip when run on the front if the terrain you ride requires any decent edge bite. Not an issue on hard/rocky terrain (where the tyre seems to excel), but for me I found whenever I was on softer dirt or even in some mud, the front end of the bike just pushed on badly.
    -It's tall and round compared to most 2.25" tyres. I would recommend running these on very wide rims. My Mavic 521's would probably be a minimum, but I'm betting these things would be very good on something like a Velocity P35. You won't want to run them on a Mavic 717!!!
    -It squirms a bit, partly cos it's tall. It feels like adding half an inch or so extra to your suspension (so it might well make a very good rear tyre on a hardtail), but along with the fact it doesn't bite well in softer terrain, I found it hard to have any confidence in it unless on rock or hardpack (where it really does bite).

    I don't know what the brief was when designing this tyre, and I'd be interested to know what rims the test riders were riding them on (I expect they were wide), but it seems to me the tyre has been designed for all out grip on very firm surfaces and as such has lost out quite a bit on softer surfaces. I think if you ride mainly trail centres, or places like the Peaks, or basically anywhere where you don't really need edge bite from a tyre (or where tall edge knobbles are a disadvantage not an advantage), you'll love these tyres. It's definitely not as good as many for softer terrain though.

    Will probably try it on the back of my hardtail rather than my full sus bike, I suspect it would suit quite well there given it seems to grip very well in a straight line (traction and braking), and the lack of edge bite will be less of a disadvantage there, but the tall round profile will also add a bit of comfort.

    I know I've only done one ride but purposefully took it on a whole selection of different terrain, and down some very steep technical sections. I'm notoriously fussy about tyres, and have ridden so many of the bloody things over the years trying to find the perfect ones. All the above said, they're cracking value for the quality compared to other makes, and if you ride mainly hardpacked and rocky places and have wide rims on your bike, you will swear by them!

    For reference, my default front tyre these days is normally a 2.2" Black Chili Rubber Queen which just seems to grip on everything I throw at it, though often run a 2.25" Michelin WildRock'r (HUGE for a 2.25, and Big edge knobs) up front on my full sus bike which doesn't grip as well on the hardpack and rocks, but bites much better in the softer conditions.

  8. #8
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    An update

    This tyre is definitely a whole lot better on the rear than on the front. On the front the lack of edge bite is off putting, on the rear I find it less so. There's definitely good traction though, and braking grip is right up there. The tyre is also pretty fast rolling, not quite as fast as a Racing Ralph or a Crossmark, but noticably quicker than most tyres. Ran it up around 40psi and it squirmed noticably less, and it didn't lack grip other than still not biting that well on the edges (like I say, less of an issue for me on the rear). So different, seemed like a different tyre on the back than on the front!

  9. #9
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    Anyone using this in the 29er variety? If so, let's hear what you think.

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