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  1. #1
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    New DT Swiss TRICON XM 1550 Wheelset

    There is a new TRICON XM 1550 wheelset at DT Swiss website, but info resumes to some Flash-made spots. Anyone have any extended info on those?

  2. #2
    wuss
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black RONIN
    There is a new TRICON XM 1550 wheelset at DT Swiss website, but info resumes to some Flash-made spots. Anyone have any extended info on those?
    http://www.dtswiss.com/Products/Whee...RICON-MTB.aspx

    A bit more info up...

  3. #3
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    anybody know when these will be released? also will they take a 20mm thru axle in the front and 12mm through in the rear

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver
    anybody know when these will be released? also will they take a 20mm thru axle in the front and 12mm through in the rear
    Seen them in 15QR front, but recently at the Yeti foruns, the new ASR5 is sporting the 12mm axle in the rear, and it's a DT Swiss axle. I'm also interested in these wheels and would love them in 20mm TA.

  5. #5
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    really like dt swiss but i want tubeless and need 20mm thru front 12mm rear. might have to go with crossmax sx

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    does anybody have any experience with new crossmax sx that can provide some insight on what they think of them so far

  7. #7
    wuss
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    There is some more information here: http://reviews.mtbr.com/interbike/dt...nterbike-2009/

    The mountain version of the wheel system is the XM 1550 Tricon, and is 26mm wide. The front is available as either 100mm/15mm or 110mm/9mm, while the rear can be 135mm/10mm or 142mm/12mm. Weights are 700 grams for the front and 850 grams for the rear. It is also available in a road version RR 1450 Tricon.

  8. #8
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    anybody try these wheels yet? Have you seen some magazine tests?

    the new Tricon 1550 UST compatible seems to be really an alternative to Mavic SLR or shimano XTR... let's wait the 1st returns

  9. #9
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    The rear hub comes in 10mm and 12mm flavour, both have the same weight, why would everyone not go with the 12mm?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wpuk
    The rear hub comes in 10mm and 12mm flavour, both have the same weight, why would everyone not go with the 12mm?
    It's a good question, but the wrong one. The correct question is why so few bikes support a 12mm axle.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropadrop
    It's a good question, but the wrong one. The correct question is why so few bikes support a 12mm axle.

    oh, I take it 12mm is just the domain of DH bikes then? and 10mm would be more than enough for a 5 Spot?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wpuk
    oh, I take it 12mm is just the domain of DH bikes then? and 10mm would be more than enough for a 5 Spot?
    12mm axles limit your choice of wheels quite a lot. The manufacturer could make changable dropouts like commencal but very few do outside freeride / dh bikes. I guess the manufacturers don't consider the added expence and complexity is worth it.

    I have to say I'm more surprised 10mm axles are still such a niche with hub manufacturers considering frames support them and DT has shown it does not really need to add weight or make mounting the wheel difficult.

  13. #13
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    Does anyone know what the service ability of these wheels are (not so much the hubs) but wheel truing and spoke replacement, is this something that could be done at a local level or are they like the new Mavic's that would need to be sent back to Mavic for spoke replacement? (different target audience on the wheels but its general info im after not a comparison)

  14. #14
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    wpuk,

    spokes are normal dt swiss spokes, search google about them and you'll find a video from interbike/eurobike with a guy from dt swiss showing how the spokes interface with the nipple/rim

    edit, they might not be 100% like a normal spoke, but at least they use steel and a regular sized nipple for truing.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vortechcoupe
    wpuk,

    spokes are normal dt swiss spokes, search google about them and you'll find a video from interbike/eurobike with a guy from dt swiss showing how the spokes interface with the nipple/rim

    edit, they might not be 100% like a normal spoke, but at least they use steel and a regular sized nipple for truing.
    Cheers found these 2

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SExkrOsbaMQ

    and

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWYEEq661AQ

    second one has more detail but its in german

    He states its 26mm wide but doesn't seem to specify internal/external (germans a bit rusty) looking at it Id have to guess its external? anyone able to confirm the internal diameter please.

  16. #16
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    "The hubs are two pieces. The hub shell is pretty thin, and DT Swiss’ rep said that rather than beef up the shell or risk having the higher spoke tension pull on the shell and potentially affect the bearings, they created a stronger flange that’s bonded to the shell. The flange handles the spoke tension stresses. To keep the flange from spinning, they have screws with tapered, smooth ends that fit flush into the holes on the shell. Above, shown apart, below they’re lined up."



    http://www.bikerumor.com/2009/09/22/...nd-mtb-wheels/ Pictures of the shell and flange are towards the bottom of the link



    Is this an industry first? or has it been used successfully in other hub designs?



    What are peoples views on the likelihood of either the bonding or grub screws failing (i would imagine there is quite a bit of rotational force going through the flange???

  17. #17
    Tribe of one
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    Ditto

    Quote Originally Posted by babar
    anybody try these wheels yet? Have you seen some magazine tests?

    the new Tricon 1550 UST compatible seems to be really an alternative to Mavic SLR or shimano XTR... let's wait the 1st returns
    Did read one blip in Velonews on the Tricon road version.

    Also saw somewhere that DT has a two year warranty for this wheelset. Although they only have a few service centers in the states and repairs would require sending them out.

    Has anyone gotten some miles on the mtb Tricons?

  18. #18
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    I measured mine at 19.8 internal and 25.6 external. I love them, but as I moved from a less suspended bike to a Pivot, I can't say how the rims themselves perform compared to anything else as there are too many overall changes in my bike system to isolate rim performance. Feels great to me!

    While they do use relatively standard spokes, my lbs told me they do have to be sent back to be worked on. That was quite a surprise to me and them (I was trying to order some spokes and nipples before anything went badly so that when something happened they would already be at the shop) and they said they couldn't order any parts for it!

    Beyond that being extremely odd (and my lbs is pretty high-end, I would trust them to rebuild these wheels) they seem great!

    I hope the reviews go well since I'm already riding them.

    Oh - and I can say I weigh a decent amount, with 'adventure camelback' I'm probably at 240 or whatever max and I don't feel like I've come close to hurting the rims. That said, I'm more of a trail/endurance/xcountry than All Mountain, so that doesn't necessarily mean much. I've bottomed out my shock a few times and done a few jumps and hit a few things not-how-I-wanted-to, so they've taken a bit of a hit here and there, and like I said not even close to a problem.

    I will be at 200 miles on them in a few days.

  19. #19
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    How much did you shell out for these wheels?
    My Bike: http://forums.mtbr.com/showpost.php?...3&postcount=49

    On-One Whippet 650b XC machine

  20. #20
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    I bought them for $1190/set.

  21. #21
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    jeez....that's quite a lot of dough.

    They must work pretty good I guess.
    My Bike: http://forums.mtbr.com/showpost.php?...3&postcount=49

    On-One Whippet 650b XC machine

  22. #22
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    Mine were part of the OEM purchase of a Pivot Mach 5, so it was definitely an upgrade charge, but less than pure aftermarket.

    Per above comments still haven't trued them or had an issue yet. I've checked them via 'push credit card 1mm away from rim surface, holding it to fork, spin rim, etc' to see if its even a tiny bit out of true, and they aren't.


    Since I bought them I've learned a lot more about weight and rims. It seems that the durability you get from these at 1550 grams is pretty amazing. They can take quite a beating, quite a beating that seems to normally be reserved for more of an 1800/1900 gram wheel. There are tons of good road wheels that aren't 1550 grams! Most of the road 'aero' wheels are around 1500/1600 (except Zip and Lightweight, which don't seem to follow normal physics).

    So that is good, but I'm still waiting for people who really know their stuff can talk about things like lateral rigidity and whatever that I don't notice the difference between a and b yet. And I don't downhill at all, so no clue about big hits and whatever.

    Oh - one cool small note. They have the low-drag / don't engage quite as fast (15 degree?) hub in back, but for very little $ you can swap something and get a higher drag / engages very fast thingy. So that is cool that you can choose which way you want to go. I'm happy with low drag at this point, but its great to know I can switch later. I'm trying to do more trials stuff, and might get them for that reason. I think it changes engagement from 15 degrees to either 6 or 9, can't remember.

    Oh, I'm only at 500 miles, so not too much yet. Hopefully I'll get in gear now and get moving!! Put some real miles on them.

  23. #23
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    Are the front hubs interchangeable between 9mm and 15mm QR?
    I bike to EAT!

  24. #24
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    Do we know if these are interchangable between 9MM and 15MM?

  25. #25
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    spoke wrench type? park? other?

    hi
    it looks like a torx style
    to true the wheel
    i'd like to get one or two to have
    there seems to be park models (and maybe some knockoffs)
    one is for shimano and the other mavic
    http://www.parktool.com/products/det...=16&item=SW-13
    http://www.parktool.com/products/det...=16&item=SW-14

    as well as some t-handle tool
    http://aebike.com/product/dt-swiss-t...l1900-qc30.htm
    but that doesnt look like to can turn the nipple like a traditional 3 sided or torx style thats required here

    anyone know what it is?
    thanks
    G

  26. #26
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    where online to buy replacement spokes, nipples, etc

    like to be prepared
    thanks
    G

  27. #27
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    There is no place to buy spokes/nipples on line. You have to send them to DT Swiss and have them replace the spoke at this time. They did say they will offer repair kits soon. I broke a spoke after two weeks of use. Pretty ridiculous that you have to send a wheel back just to replace a spoke.

  28. #28
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    plus that rim/spoke interface is just asinine, the "boat" they use requires huge spoke holes and adds considerable weight to the outside of the wheel. easton/shimano have the best tubeless interface with the dual threaded nipple.

  29. #29
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    I kinda dig the interface. The "boat" adds how much weight??? The whole darn wheelset is only 1550g!

  30. #30
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    listing


  31. #31
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    does the 'boat' have a watertight seal against the rim?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riken
    does the 'boat' have a watertight seal against the rim?
    No it does not need it because there are tiny weep holes that would drain any water out.Just in case anyone is interested I have used mine with QR axle set up this summer and loved them.They were much stiffer than my Mavic Crossmax SLR set and I am now running larger tires.The SLRs were a pinging nightmare[ spoke problems] these Tricons are quiet.I just converted my hubs to 142x12 rear,15mm front and it cost less then $100 and took 20min with no special tools except the ones for the centerlock brake rotors.

  33. #33
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    these wheels came on my Giant X Trance and they have been great - strong and light. BUT I just had a wipeout where a small tree lodged between the wheel and the fork putting the wheel out of true by a bit. Now I have trued lots of wheels and built many from scratch. This thing is a JOKE! Not user serviceable at all. Took lots of searching to get the right torx spoke wrench but the bladed spokes turn when you turn the nipple to true it. It must take some very specific tools to do this - I padded a vice grip to hold the bladed spoke as close as possible to the nipple but the one inch of spoke between grip and nipple twisted and the nipple would not release. I read online that DT uses a strong thread lock compound - yes, like welded. So the wheel is useless - local shops cannot fix it - a normal wheel I would have had it trued in and hour easily. Never buying another DT Swiss wheel. Other posters have said their customer service is terrible which is what I found - no reply to my queries. So be it... avoid DT Swiss. Pissed off hugely in Canada - have to borrow a bike for a road trip MTB tomorrow.

  34. #34
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    Same thing happened to me and I bought the tools to fix it for $80 and they do not work. Then I sent it to local service center and they broke it and sent me a brand new rim free. These are very strong but when you do mess them up you are screwed. Even following the directions on heating spokes with heat gun and infra red thermometer they still snapped. I like them and beat the crap out of them but they are a return to DT or throw away item.

  35. #35
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    Same story here, busted a spoke on a tricon m1700 less than 300 miles on the rear wheel !
    Tool Kit: 135 $
    Universal Cycles -- DT-Swiss Tricon Tool Kit
    Rebuilt kit 100$ EACH wheel.
    DT Swiss Tricon M 1700 Wheel Rebuild Kit | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    Shame on you Dt Swiss. Never again.

  36. #36
    VII
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    I have a pair of XM 1550, too. They were great until they got untrue due to a stick in the front spokes and a blow out in the rear that dented the rim. Not the wheels' fault. However, my lbs never was able to get them right again. From then on, spokes began to snap every few weeks. I got tired of wasting time and money at the lbs, so I sent them back to DT Swiss. Lo and behold, they rebuilt them both for me, and replaced the rear rim, all free of charge. It cost me $17 in shipping to get them there, and less than two weeks later I got back perfect wheels. So...I'm not so happy about having to send them in, but DT Swiss did take good care of me, and they are great wheels: crazy stiff, light, bling, and insanely smooth hubs. I also like that I can swap the front from 9mm to 15mm very easily.

    I've put them through nearly 4,000 miles of aggressive all mountain riding on a 5.5-inch bike. Hubs are smooth like on day one with no maintenance so far, and until they got untrue due to trail hazards those wheels performed perfectly. My advice is to send them back to DT Swiss for service once there is a real issue. Would I buy them again? I'm not sure... I think there is a drawback to any wheel with proprietary spokes. In case of failure, there is no quick and easy repair. Since there are few spokes, once you pop one they become basically unrideable.

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