Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Looking for Adventure
    Reputation: Ricksom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,023

    Mounting Direction of Kenda Nevegal in Rear

    Tires say direction should be the same for the front and rear. However, I wonder if this is ideal for the rear. Wouldn't the climbing traction be better with the tire reversed, the sharp side of the centre blocks biting into the ground rather than the sloped side of the centre blocks?
    Perhaps the sloped side biting in would be better for shedding mud...

    What's your experience? I have the new Tomac series 2.1 Stick E.

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    47,871
    When reversed the braking suffers. I prefer better braking.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  3. #3
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,709
    You've both got the reasoning backwards I think??? but Shig is still correct when he says to run it the same way as the front.

    The sharp edges of the knobs DO contact the dirt first if you mount it forward. So reversing it would increase braking but decrease forward traction.

    JMH


    JMH

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    When reversed the braking suffers. I prefer better braking.

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    47,871
    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    You've both got the reasoning backwards I think??? but Shig is still correct when he says to run it the same way as the front.

    The sharp edges of the knobs DO contact the dirt first if you mount it forward. So reversing it would increase braking but decrease forward traction.

    JMH


    JMH
    Sorry, no. You have it wrong.

    Rotation is to the right/down

    The leading edge of the center blocks are ramped. Square edge is in the braking direction.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •