Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 401 to 500 of 570
  1. #401
    RAKC
    Reputation: tigris99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,124
    If the rim is that messed up from shipping I wouldn't ride their rims anyway. Takes some serious weight/force to trash a hoop like that. Was the box crushed, both rims in the same box?

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  2. #402
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by VegasSingleSpeed View Post
    I think it was the 1/8" of foam packing that failed.
    My rims too had that bs foam packing. It was a joke and expected my rims to be messed up too but they were perfect

  3. #403
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    172
    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    Was the box crushed, both rims in the same box?
    Both rims in the same box. The box didn't appear crushed when I picked it up from the post office, but upon inspection this evening, there is a pair of indentations in the bottom of the box the width of one rim, and the top of the box clearly bowed under pressure.

    I have removed the good rim I laced earlier this evening, and am re-lacing the WTB i23 back onto the hub. I'm over it.

  4. #404
    mtbr member
    Reputation: teamx151's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    The new plus rims are available. We have some more work to do on the product filters etc, but here is a direct link to the ad for now.

    https://www.lightbicycle.com/product...ess-compatible
    Any chance you will be making these same wheels for 29+ bikes? Thanks!

  5. #405
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghughes.hesinc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    452
    Quote Originally Posted by teamx151 View Post
    Any chance you will be making these same wheels for 29+ bikes? Thanks!
    See my post from the previous page. Basically they said no.

  6. #406
    mtbr member
    Reputation: teamx151's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by ghughes.hesinc View Post
    See my post from the previous page. Basically they said no.
    Thanks, I saw after posting. It's to bad, because other rim manufactures are building that size and I would like to see a carbon wheel that size.

  7. #407
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghughes.hesinc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    452
    Quote Originally Posted by teamx151 View Post
    Thanks, I saw after posting. It's to bad, because other rim manufactures are building that size and I would like to see a carbon wheel that size.
    I know, I like LB's reputation. I would love to be able to order a asymmetrical 29+ wheelset from them...

    Nextie offers a really similar rim, and they will build wheelsets too.

  8. #408
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    498
    They do make one but it's not asymmetrical;
    https://www.lightbicycle.com/Hand-bu...ompatible.html

  9. #409
    West Chester, PA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,145
    Just got an email from Light Bikes. They've partnered with NOBL to open a north American warehouse and customer service team. Good job Light Bikes and Nobl!

    Now the people who refuse to buy Chinese made parts unless they are sold by "western" companies can jump on the bandwagon.

  10. #410
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    Just got an email from Light Bikes. They've partnered with NOBL to open a north American warehouse and customer service team. Good job Light Bikes and Nobl!

    Now the people who refuse to buy Chinese made parts unless they are sold by "western" companies can jump on the bandwagon.
    Was excited to get the news, too. Four sets dating back to "early adopter" years with zero problems. Properly built by local bikesmith, oldest pair has over 2000 hours.

    Having said that, I can't find individual rim sales on the northamerican site.

  11. #411
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,023
    Yes, but it seems they will only offer I9 hubs. Blah.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  12. #412
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Yes, but it seems they will only offer I9 hubs. Blah.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Ditto. I want rims with discounted shipping, not expensive wheelsets costing $600 more than my own handbuilts.

  13. #413
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Yes, but it seems they will only offer I9 hubs. Blah.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Not only that but only Asymmetrical Rims only too. This is just the beginning. Id imagine them having more options in the future. It a nice move though.

    Got a month so far on my rims and i couldnt be happier with the build and performance. This is my christmas present with LB rims with Hadleys, DB black Sapim spokes all together with my wheel builder doing the truing and tension was $960 total!

    Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-img_4093.jpg

  14. #414
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Hi MTBR,

    We have launched our North American location today! The Canadian location is up and running, the US location is starting in March. The Canadian location can start shipping to the US immediately, and there is quite a bit of inventory held, but some customs charges will most likely apply so there is a pre-order option for those wanting guaranteed no duty or customs charges once the US warehouse opens.

    Wheel building will happen out of all 3 locations, China, Canada, and USA.

    The us.lightbicycle.com website only offers asymmetric I9 wheelsets at the launch but we will certainly add more options like alternate hub options, broader range of our rims (fatbike, road, 38mm MTB rims etc), and the option to purchase rims-only.

    For customized orders like 12k weave, glossy finish, custom drilling, then the Chinese factory can handle those orders. The plan is for the North American facility to be able to facilitate custom orders and process through the Chinese factory thus giving North American customers more coverage throughout the day. This will be especially helpful over the coming Chinese New Year vacation which starts next week.

    If you have any more questions about the North American operation, feel free to send an e-mail at support@us.lightbicycle.com or explore the new website. We look forward to working with our new team there to keep expanding the products and service capabilities in the near future!
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  15. #415
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    26
    What about Europe? Are you going to expand here as well..?

  16. #416
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    and the option to purchase rims-only.
    This is what many want, I'm presuming. Save a lot of money on shipping two rims from China! When this happens the North American site will get my business.

  17. #417
    West Chester, PA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,145
    /\ Me too.
    But I'm anticipating the delivered price for bare rims being higher than it currently is. Kind of hope that's not the case because there's more than enough mark-up to keep the prices in the same ballpark and make the partners happy (Plus the "premium" for the better customer service people will be expecting). It's not a coincidence that Light Bikes has been working hard on their branding recently, this is part of moving up-market. We'll see I guess.

  18. #418
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Radical_53's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    505
    Well, you can either have it cheaper or get it faster. Makes sense to me.


    Gesendet von iPhone mit Tapatalk

  19. #419
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by westin View Post
    This is what many want, I'm presuming. Save a lot of money on shipping two rims from China! When this happens the North American site will get my business.
    Only if they don't raise the prices once they are being sold and shipped within the US.
    2012 Cannondale Supersix Evo 2 /// 2012 Specialized Carbon 29 HT/Rigid /// 2000 Ritchey Swiss Cross

  20. #420
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hardboiled's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    704
    light bike, can you say more about your partnership with NOBL? what exactly are you doing together? are they just shipping your rims out of their warehouses, or are you sharing designs, quality control, etc?

  21. #421
    I should be out riding
    Reputation: ACree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,613
    Quote Originally Posted by agentsmith View Post
    Only if they don't raise the prices once they are being sold and shipped within the US.
    Exactly. Order now to avoid customs/duty fees doesn't sound encouraging to me. Customer service and warranty needs to increase if prices increase, whether direct through a price increase or indirect through other fees.
    If it's not powered solely by you, it's a motorcycle.

    Worshiping at the Church of Singletrack since 1993.

  22. #422
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by westin View Post
    This is what many want, I'm presuming. Save a lot of money on shipping two rims from China! When this happens the North American site will get my business.
    I cant imagine cheaper rims at all. If anything, id imagine this is going to make the cost higher.

    Lets look at their shipping now. My 2 rims came from china to florida in about 10 days. Shipping cost was $50 and the box was 30x30x4 and 7lbs. Any domestic Shipper is gonna charge at least $15 for that box. Its a large box even if the weight isnt that much.

    Now they have to pay for an office. They have to pay for a person to relocate to america. They will probably import using shipping containers which will certainly subject to taxes and tariffs as America makes carbon fiber products domestically too. You'd have to think these extra costs are gonna go into the price of the wheels domestically.

    Shipping time will somewhat be reduced as it certainly will be faster domestically then importing from china but how much faster. It can take anywhere from 3-7 days to ship from California to Florida....I guess it will save like 4-6 days in shipping time.

    Warranty replacement and customer service will be greatly improved by a move like this but i cant see cost reduction a huge motivation to open up several different offices in several countries.

  23. #423
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by agentsmith View Post
    Only if they don't raise the prices once they are being sold and shipped within the US.
    We anticipate very similar landed pricing by the time the product lands to a customer. the same will be true for rims-only once that program is released.

    The Industry 9 wheelsets for example have about the same delivered cost as our DT 240 wheelsets once you look at shipping, tape/valves, payment fees. Our goal is to keep the pricing aggressive but at the same time enhance our service.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  24. #424
    I should be out riding
    Reputation: ACree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,613
    Please add Industry 9 single speed hubs as well.

    Although after pricing out a wheel using the new tool, it was not at a price level where I would buy a complete wheel.
    If it's not powered solely by you, it's a motorcycle.

    Worshiping at the Church of Singletrack since 1993.

  25. #425
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by ACree View Post
    Exactly. Order now to avoid customs/duty fees doesn't sound encouraging to me. Customer service and warranty needs to increase if prices increase, whether direct through a price increase or indirect through other fees.
    Hi ACree, We have not made any substantial price increases for launching the North America locations, the pricing is very similar to China all things considered. For the USA pre-orders, it will ship US to US so there will not be any duty charged so the savings can be substantial. There is also offering free domestic shipping, and if you pay in advance there is an additional $50 savings. The North American facilities do not charge "fees" like a paypal fee, the pricing model is very straightforward.

    The idea of the pre-order was to prioritize filling those orders first. But once the facility is open, you will still benefit from fast shipping, large inventory, no duty, enhanced warranty turnaround. Customers willing to (potentially) pay duty can order from the Canada location if they like, it is in USD so there are no foreign currency surcharges charged by paypal/credit card.

    All customers are still free order from China if they like.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  26. #426
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeRock98 View Post
    I cant imagine cheaper rims at all. If anything, id imagine this is going to make the cost higher.

    Lets look at their shipping now. My 2 rims came from china to florida in about 10 days. Shipping cost was $50 and the box was 30x30x4 and 7lbs. Any domestic Shipper is gonna charge at least $15 for that box. Its a large box even if the weight isnt that much.

    Now they have to pay for an office. They have to pay for a person to relocate to america. They will probably import using shipping containers which will certainly subject to taxes and tariffs as America makes carbon fiber products domestically too. You'd have to think these extra costs are gonna go into the price of the wheels domestically.

    Shipping time will somewhat be reduced as it certainly will be faster domestically then importing from china but how much faster. It can take anywhere from 3-7 days to ship from California to Florida....I guess it will save like 4-6 days in shipping time.

    Warranty replacement and customer service will be greatly improved by a move like this but i cant see cost reduction a huge motivation to open up several different offices in several countries.
    One thing to mention is that the shipping options will be much stronger with domestic shipping. If the product is in stock (which in most cases it will be), then you could choose overnight shipping if you need something really quick.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  27. #427
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by ACree View Post
    Please add Industry 9 single speed hubs as well.

    Although after pricing out a wheel using the new tool, it was not at a price level where I would buy a complete wheel.
    We will be adding other less expensive rims to the equation in the coming months. For single speed I9's those can be ordered, you'd just have to e-mail the North American team to process that.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  28. #428
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by hardboiled View Post
    light bike, can you say more about your partnership with NOBL? what exactly are you doing together? are they just shipping your rims out of their warehouses, or are you sharing designs, quality control, etc?
    Hello,

    Sure, no problem. They are building the wheels for us in Canada and will be building wheels for us in the USA as well in the near future. They have expanded their facilities to accommodate our increased volume. Light Bicycle workers are being added as the North American operation grows. They will be trained and managed by their team, but of course will work closely with the Chinese team here also.

    We have been working on the integration for quite some time so that we become more familiar with their practices, and them with ours. Their brand has unique products, but there has been some sharing of technology and manufacturing practices. Ultimately, both companies agreed that they can both benefit and grow stronger by working together.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  29. #429
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Derp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    47
    edited

  30. #430
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    793
    I, for one, am excited about this new venture. I have been wanting to put carbon wheels on both of my Knolly's for about 6 months, but have put it off for various reasons. This news comes at a perfect time. Once the US site is up and running, I plan on making 2 purchases for rims. Thanks LB
    *2018 Pivot Mach 5.5 Custom Build*
    *2017 Knolly Warden Custom Build*
    *2014 Knolly Endorphin Custom Build*

  31. #431
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,988
    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    Just got an email from Light Bikes. They've partnered with NOBL to open a north American warehouse and customer service team. Good job Light Bikes and Nobl!

    Now the people who refuse to buy Chinese made parts unless they are sold by "western" companies can jump on the bandwagon.
    That email made me raise my eyebrows for sure - A very interesting partership considering when I first contacted nobl when they were breaking onto the scene, I flat out asked them if their rims were made by light bicycle (as the rim dimensions were practically identical at the time). Got a big no on that.

    Now they are teamed up?

  32. #432
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    172
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Ohhhhhh! That's painful. I feel for you, mang.

    But duuuuude! I woulda had those outta the box within minutes of them being dropped off by the delivery service....but that's how I am with toys. I won't twist the knife further, though. You gotta be pissssssed!

    Hope you get a favorable resolution.

    UPDATE:

    Yes, Light-Bicycle has come through with a favorable resolution: they are replacing both rims. Certainly, the crux of the issue was my failure to inspect both rims when I received the shipment, and the timeliness to discover the damaged rim and report this to LB. I fully expected to be told to pound sand, and would have had no animosity towards LB if that was their decision; but, they didn't.

    Thank you, LB!

  33. #433
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    10
    Has anyone done a build using Industry Nine system hubs and straight pull i9 spokes?

    I've got Ultralights currently with Crests but they are a little twitchy cornering which have the 2.5 or 2.3mm spokes.

    Speaking with i9 and they discourage it due to spoke hole spacing tolerances. If anyone could clear this up I'll probably place an order.

  34. #434
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    290
    Hey all, I'm trying to decide between a few different light bicycle rims and hoping for some guidance.

    First up I'm around 87kg all kitted up.

    150mm 27.5" ibis hd3 bike.

    Mainly ride trails, all mountain and some enduro events.

    Currently I have Stans Flow MK3 rims.

    So tossing up between -
    RM650BC13
    RM650BC05

    I'd prefer the 30mm or less ID as tend to run 2.35 tyres mainly and don't want to square them off or have extra weight in unnecessary width.

    But I think the 38mm ones are going to be stronger?

    Thanks
    Joel

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

  35. #435
    aka: Bucky Fikes
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,472
    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Fitzgerald View Post
    Hey all, I'm trying to decide between a few different light bicycle rims and hoping for some guidance.

    First up I'm around 87kg all kitted up.

    150mm 27.5" ibis hd3 bike.

    Mainly ride trails, all mountain and some enduro events.

    Currently I have Stans Flow MK3 rims.

    So tossing up between -
    RM650BC13
    RM650BC05

    I'd prefer the 30mm or less ID as tend to run 2.35 tyres mainly and don't want to square them off or have extra weight in unnecessary width.

    But I think the 38mm ones are going to be stronger?

    Thanks
    Joel

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    What tires do you find yourself using the most?
    Always ride with a purpose.

  36. #436
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    290
    Minion DHF up front and Aggressors on the rear.

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

  37. #437
    aka: Bucky Fikes
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,472
    The 38/31.6mm profiles 2.35 Schwalbe tires beautifully. I haven't run a Minion yet but I happen to have a new 2.4 Ardent on the rear right now and it's not squared off. It actually lets the sidewalls out a bit so the tread takes on a nice rounded profile. This is on 26" but I just built some 35mm i.d. 29'r wheels and get nearly identical results.

    Just food for thought. If I did it again, I'd stick with the 38/31.6 hoops.
    Always ride with a purpose.

  38. #438
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Fitzgerald View Post
    Hey all, I'm trying to decide between a few different light bicycle rims and hoping for some guidance.

    First up I'm around 87kg all kitted up.

    150mm 27.5" ibis hd3 bike.

    Mainly ride trails, all mountain and some enduro events.

    Currently I have Stans Flow MK3 rims.

    So tossing up between -
    RM650BC13
    RM650BC05

    I'd prefer the 30mm or less ID as tend to run 2.35 tyres mainly and don't want to square them off or have extra weight in unnecessary width.

    But I think the 38mm ones are going to be stronger?

    Thanks
    Joel

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
    Hi Joel,

    The 35mm rims have more compliance than the 38's and are quite a bit lighter, but the 38's are going to take more abuse if you're worried about that.

    The happy medium is going to be the AM728's as the 28mm internal width is going to work perfectly for 2.3-ish tires. You have to be more selective about your tires with the 38's. These rival the 38's as far as impact resistance goes and feel a bit more neutral as they are not overly deep (but still much stiffer and more responsive than your current rims).

    Some might find the 2.3 Minion a bit too square on the 38's, that's personal preference. You can get a 2.4" Minion which works well on the 38's though because it's a bit rounder of a profile. I don't think this is even listed as a tubeless version so a lot of people probably skip over it, but they actually work just fine tubeless.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  39. #439
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    161
    Thinking about building up some AM733 wheels for my IBIS HD3. I weigh 215 lbs. Ride trail, AM, and some limited Enduro runs a couple time per year. Will hit lift access bike parks 2 times per year not an extreme rider by any means. Wheels will see about 1K of riding per year. Few Questions:

    Was wondering about durability of the I9 hub vs. DT Swiss 240? My current Hope Pro4s had an issues at about 6 months...maybe was a fluke.

    Where to draw the line between the EN733 and AM733? With my weight is the AM733 a risk as I would prefer lighter weight wheel if possible.

    If I want to go DT Swiss does that rule out a US build?

    If I go DT Swiss what extra fees would I pay shipping to US. Can I change the POE to the higher count or do I have to do an upgrade later?

    Is there any coupons available?

  40. #440
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve_MTB_22 View Post
    Thinking about building up some AM733 wheels for my IBIS HD3. I weigh 215 lbs. Ride trail, AM, and some limited Enduro runs a couple time per year. Will hit lift access bike parks 2 times per year not an extreme rider by any means. Wheels will see about 1K of riding per year. Few Questions:

    Was wondering about durability of the I9 hub vs. DT Swiss 240? My current Hope Pro4s had an issues at about 6 months...maybe was a fluke.

    Where to draw the line between the EN733 and AM733? With my weight is the AM733 a risk as I would prefer lighter weight wheel if possible.

    If I want to go DT Swiss does that rule out a US build?

    If I go DT Swiss what extra fees would I pay shipping to US. Can I change the POE to the higher count or do I have to do an upgrade later?

    Is there any coupons available?
    Hi Steve,

    From the sounds of it the AM733's would work great for you.

    The US operation is now offering Industry Nine and Onyx wheelsets. The DT and I9 hubs are both quite reliable (similar durability), we find there are less issues with these compared to the less expensive Hope hubs. The bearing quality seems to be better in the more expensive hubs for sure. If you want 240's you'd have to order from the Chinese site.

    I'm not sure if we have any of the 36T or 54T star ratchets left in stock, you could check with customer service support@lightbicycle.com when you order. There would be an up-charge for this.

    For the US site, there is a pre-order going on until the end of the month for $50 off and free shipping on all Onyx and Industry Nine asymmetric wheelsets. No coupon code required, just be sure to click the Pre-Order product page.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  41. #441
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chris9888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    617
    Please take note if you order direct from China factory. If they don't have ex-stock, the rims will take more than 12 days to make, exclude shipping time. Ordered mine on 13 Feb, still waiting for shipment. Their production has overloaded. No idea when they will ship my rims, going to miss my ride.

  42. #442
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182

    USA wheel building and warehouse now open!

    Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_008-1-.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_005.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_000.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_004.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_006.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_008.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_006-1-.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_001.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_007.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-file_002.jpg
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  43. #443
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,988
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_008 (1).jpg 
Views:	261 
Size:	99.7 KB 
ID:	1126335Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_005.jpg 
Views:	274 
Size:	107.4 KB 
ID:	1126332Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_000.jpg 
Views:	284 
Size:	104.6 KB 
ID:	1126329Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_004.jpg 
Views:	267 
Size:	108.1 KB 
ID:	1126319Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_006.jpg 
Views:	314 
Size:	114.8 KB 
ID:	1126314Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_008.jpg 
Views:	267 
Size:	106.0 KB 
ID:	1126336Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_006 (1).jpg 
Views:	268 
Size:	98.1 KB 
ID:	1126333Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_001.jpg 
Views:	278 
Size:	64.0 KB 
ID:	1126330Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_007.jpg 
Views:	268 
Size:	97.1 KB 
ID:	1126334Click image for larger version. 

Name:	File_002.jpg 
Views:	253 
Size:	72.0 KB 
ID:	1126331
    Are your onyx hubs the same ones you use for your nobl wheel builds?

  44. #444
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    68
    LB you should offer Onyx hub on your custom wheels. now itís helping only US customers.
    but there is also rest of world

    ordered pair of AM740 rims and going to lace them to onyx hubs.

  45. #445
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6,787
    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Are your onyx hubs the same ones you use for your nobl wheel builds?
    Onyx is a brand like DT Swiss- why would they be different?
    OG Ripley v2
    Carver 420 TI

  46. #446
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by VitaliT View Post
    LB you should offer Onyx hub on your custom wheels. now itís helping only US customers.
    but there is also rest of world

    ordered pair of AM740 rims and going to lace them to onyx hubs.
    We can ship internationally from us.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  47. #447
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1
    Nobl has a hub made using Onyx internals with their own hub shell design and front axle system.

  48. #448
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6,787
    Quote Originally Posted by DOrellana View Post
    Nobl has a hub made using Onyx internals with their own hub shell design and front axle system.
    Those are marked with the Nobl brand on the hubs. The picture shows Onyx hubs.
    OG Ripley v2
    Carver 420 TI

  49. #449
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 006_007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,988
    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Onyx is a brand like DT Swiss- why would they be different?
    Because NOBL uses ONYX hubs that they have modified.

    In the past, I have asked NOBL if they are using wheels manufactured by light bicycle - received negative resposnse - even though their rims looked very similar.

    Saw that NOBL was using a modified/lighter version of an onyx hub

    Now see that NOBL is teamed up selling light bicycle wheels with onyx hubs, and am asking if they are the same modified version.

    Not that far of a stretch seeing as the guy that runs nobl appears to be affiliated with light bicycle.

  50. #450
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Derp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    47
    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Because NOBL uses ONYX hubs that they have modified.

    In the past, I have asked NOBL if they are using wheels manufactured by light bicycle - received negative resposnse - even though their rims looked very similar.

    Saw that NOBL was using a modified/lighter version of an onyx hub

    Now see that NOBL is teamed up selling light bicycle wheels with onyx hubs, and am asking if they are the same modified version.

    Not that far of a stretch seeing as the guy that runs nobl appears to be affiliated with light bicycle.
    LB and Nobl are the exact same rims made in the same factory using different decals.

  51. #451
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chris9888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    617
    RM29C14 Heavy Duty Version. Build with Chris King Hubs Boost

    Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-img_9461.jpg

  52. #452
    mtbr member
    Reputation: VonFalkenhausen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    398
    Thanks to LB for getting the US office open on time! I got my AM928 rims today, shipped from Minnesota. Nice change to not have to pay extra for and worry about the trip around the world, and the pre-order special was extra nice. My new Onyx hubs showed up last week, time to order some spokes!

  53. #453
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by Derp View Post
    LB and Nobl are the exact same rims made in the same factory using different decals.
    That is not true.

    Nobl did sell some of our rims quite a few years ago when they were first starting out. They have never put their name on any of our rims.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  54. #454
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    6,787
    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Those are marked with the Nobl brand on the hubs. The picture shows Onyx hubs.
    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Because NOBL uses ONYX hubs that they have modified.

    In the past, I have asked NOBL if they are using wheels manufactured by light bicycle - received negative resposnse - even though their rims looked very similar.

    Saw that NOBL was using a modified/lighter version of an onyx hub

    Now see that NOBL is teamed up selling light bicycle wheels with onyx hubs, and am asking if they are the same modified version.

    Not that far of a stretch seeing as the guy that runs nobl appears to be affiliated with light bicycle.
    See post above yours
    OG Ripley v2
    Carver 420 TI

  55. #455
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Updates!

    There are now 20 different rims stocked at the US location. Some of the EN and Heavy Duty version of the rims as well as our less expensive products are now in stock. You can get our complete carbon wheels on Industry Nine Wheelsets DELIVERED from $1077.10, or $1,139.10 on Onyx hubs (any color).

    Our North American website us.lightbicycle.com now changes to Canadian pricing automatically for customers located in Canada. An expanded MTB lineup is in transit to the Canadian location.

    On the International site, you can use our compare tool to look at the variances between rims: https://www.lightbicycle.com/product...n-on-29ER.html

    We're always working to improve our websites and products, if you have any suggestions on what you'd like to see from us, please send us a private e-mail to support@us.lightbicycle.com or support@lightbicycle.com

    Thank you!!
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  56. #456
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    597
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    Updates!

    There are now 20 different rims stocked at the US location. Some of the EN and Heavy Duty version of the rims as well as our less expensive products are now in stock. You can get our complete carbon wheels on Industry Nine Wheelsets DELIVERED from $1077.10, or $1,139.10 on Onyx hubs (any color).

    Our North American website us.lightbicycle.com now changes to Canadian pricing automatically for customers located in Canada. An expanded MTB lineup is in transit to the Canadian location.

    On the International site, you can use our compare tool to look at the variances between rims: https://www.lightbicycle.com/product...n-on-29ER.html

    We're always working to improve our websites and products, if you have any suggestions on what you'd like to see from us, please send us a private e-mail to support@us.lightbicycle.com or support@lightbicycle.com

    Thank you!!
    Not specifically in the market at the moment, but I'd love to see some DT 350 options, just to save some money.

  57. #457
    aka: Bucky Fikes
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,472
    Light Bicycle, any plans in the works for adding a drain hole in the rims like so many others do for great reason? So much water build up inside my last set of L-B hoops. I won't build with them again but will in a heart beat if a drain is added.
    Always ride with a purpose.

  58. #458
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by garcia View Post
    Not specifically in the market at the moment, but I'd love to see some DT 350 options, just to save some money.
    We stock the DT 350 hubs at our Chinese office and can ship worldwide. For now, the US/Canada operation is not offering DT Swiss hubs.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  59. #459
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Light Bicycle, any plans in the works for adding a drain hole in the rims like so many others do for great reason? So much water build up inside my last set of L-B hoops. I won't build with them again but will in a heart beat if a drain is added.
    I think we could add a drain hole for you if you mention that in the notes at checkout or e-mail support@lightbicycle.com to place the order. We have to add a bit of reinforcement so the lead time would be a bit longer.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  60. #460
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,134
    Having DT Swiss hubs at US ops would be great if they are cheaper than Hope. I've been scared out of Novatech hubs after reading around the internets :/

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
    '12 Scott Spark 29 Team
    '13 Scott Scale 970
    '11 Scott Speedster S20
    '99 Spec' FSR Comp
    '9x Spec' Hardrock Cromo rigid

  61. #461
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    669
    DT Swiss hubs are more expensive than Hope.

    Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

  62. #462
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tikiguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    101
    Edit: Knee jerk response to pricing, Apologies LB

    [QUOTE=light bicycle;13107717]Updates!

    There are now 20 different rims stocked at the US location. Some of the EN and Heavy Duty version of the rims as well as our less expensive products are now in stock. You can get our complete carbon wheels on Industry Nine Wheelsets DELIVERED from $1077.10, or $1,139.10 on Onyx hubs (any color).

    Our North American website us.lightbicycle.com now changes to Canadian pricing automatically for customers located in Canada. An expanded MTB lineup is in transit to the Canadian location.

    On the International site, you can use our compare tool to look at the variances between rims: [url]https://www.lightbicycle.com/product
    Last edited by Tikiguy; 04-04-2017 at 10:56 AM.
    2016 Whyte T-130C RS

  63. #463
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    The $1077.10 price example mentioned was using the 27mm wide 27.5" rims on I9 hubs with the $35 flat rate shipping option from the US wheel building warehouse. The price will vary depending on which rims you build with. Also, Sapim Race and D-Light spokes are used for standard builds with CX-Rays having an extra charge. But yes, it's a good price for sure
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  64. #464
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    293
    I just went and looked at the LB us website and to build a wheel set-- onyx and sapim race/D-light spokes are not offered as a option...

  65. #465
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Hi SB Trails,

    We have those options for every wheelset, can you send me a private message with a link of which page is not working? If you scroll down when selecting the build options, you should see this:
    Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-spoke-options.png
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  66. #466
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    109
    Looking for spoke length for my rear wheel. I have the RM650BC13, 38mm, 27.5 version rim with DT240S J-Bend hub, 142mm. When I purchase it a yr ago, it came with a few spares...wish I measure them before using them up. Does anyone know what the correct length are?

  67. #467
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by chumanji9 View Post
    Looking for spoke length for my rear wheel. I have the RM650BC13, 38mm, 27.5 version rim with DT240S J-Bend hub, 142mm. When I purchase it a yr ago, it came with a few spares...wish I measure them before using them up. Does anyone know what the correct length are?
    If it's a 6-bolt disc, 32h 3-cross, go with 261mm on both sides ideally.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  68. #468
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,141
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    If it's a 6-bolt disc, 32h 3-cross, go with 261mm on both sides ideally.
    Wondering how you came up w/ 261mm. The LB site shows ERD = 536mm for this rim, and the DT spoke calculator shows 259mm spoke using the hub you assume @chuman is using (32H IS 3X) and a 536mm ERD. So you're using an ERD of 539 or 540 rather than the 536 that is spec'd?

    Also wondering why @chuman is "using up" spokes.

  69. #469
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by InertiaMan View Post
    Wondering how you came up w/ 261mm. The LB site shows ERD = 536mm for this rim, and the DT spoke calculator shows 259mm spoke using the hub you assume @chuman is using (32H IS 3X) and a 536mm ERD. So you're using an ERD of 539 or 540 rather than the 536 that is spec'd?

    Also wondering why @chuman is "using up" spokes.
    260's should be fine as well, I tend to go a little longer in case the nipples have a larger head. I used a bit larger ERD as the one listed on the Chinese site is measure on nipple bed to nipple bed. The North American site lists 3 ERD's depending on how your calculator looks at ERD and depending on what nipples you use. https://us.lightbicycle.com/shop/27-...mm-carbon-rim/
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  70. #470
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,520
    Wow, light is active here. Got questions but not for my MTB


    Can you get in Hope road hubs ? Wanting RRU45TO2 wheels , 20 spoke front 24 spoke rear, rim brake setup and on Hope hubs. Is it possible ?

  71. #471
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by terrasmak View Post
    Wow, light is active here. Got questions but not for my MTB


    Can you get in Hope road hubs ? Wanting RRU45TO2 wheels , 20 spoke front 24 spoke rear, rim brake setup and on Hope hubs. Is it possible ?
    I don't think we have any Hope road hubs, we mostly sell DT240/350's or Bitex as cheap/light option with reasonable durability. I'll inquire about getting the Hope's for you.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  72. #472
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    969
    I tried searching the thread and on the forum but didn't find much. How is the ride quality of these wheels on rough terrain? I'm looking at the 650BC05 (30mm internal width) rims. If anyone is using the asymmetrical version (AM728), i'd like to hear ride quality comments on that too.

  73. #473
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,938
    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    How is the ride quality of these wheels on rough terrain?
    Carbon rims are stiffer than aluminum rims, but you don't really get vertical compliance out of rims, if you did, things would go bad quickly. You'll get faster accelerations, possibly a little less compliance, but that's the sort that is made up with grips and tires.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  74. #474
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Carbon rims are stiffer than aluminum rims, but you don't really get vertical compliance out of rims, if you did, things would go bad quickly. You'll get faster accelerations, possibly a little less compliance, but that's the sort that is made up with grips and tires.
    I know that they're stiffer than alloy but not all carbon wheels ride the same. Enves have developed a reputation for being too harsh on rough terrain, for example.

  75. #475
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    109
    Thanks for the reply on the spoke length, Lightbicycle and InertiaMan... BTW, the reason I am using spokes is because I kept snapping nipples. Turns out the nipples on my bike has oxidized. I am guessing its cause by the water crossing on my trails. I am rebuilding with brass version this time.

  76. #476
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,134
    Quote Originally Posted by chumanji9 View Post
    Thanks for the reply on the spoke length, Lightbicycle and InertiaMan... BTW, the reason I am using spokes is because I kept snapping nipples. Turns out the nipples on my bike has oxidized. I am guessing its cause by the water crossing on my trails. I am rebuilding with brass version this time.
    Were those alu nipples anodized?
    '12 Scott Spark 29 Team
    '13 Scott Scale 970
    '11 Scott Speedster S20
    '99 Spec' FSR Comp
    '9x Spec' Hardrock Cromo rigid

  77. #477
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,938
    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    I know that they're stiffer than alloy but not all carbon wheels ride the same. Enves have developed a reputation for being too harsh on rough terrain, for example.
    To which I say BS, unless there is a scientific test that can prove otherwise.

  78. #478
    mtbr member
    Reputation: justinnardella's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    104
    When the dt swiss spoke calc asks for ERD, should I enter the bed to bed ERD? Or one of the other ERDs. (I am looking on the US website).


    And I am trying to decide between the RM29C07 and the RM29C14. Seems a bit odd to me that the c07 is stiffer from side to side yet more vertically compliant (according to the comparison charts on the normal LB site). Isn't the the U-shape profile of the c14 supposed to be stronger overall than the more traditional profile of the c07?

    I am really leaning towards the c07 as I ride both enduro and xc on the same bike, and the c07 is considerably lighter imo. Any recommendations?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  79. #479
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    969
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    To which I say BS, unless there is a scientific test that can prove otherwise.
    Why would this be so far fetched? Not all carbon frames ride the same, and "feel" is subjective anyway. I've ridden Enves on demo bikes, and haven't felt them that much different than my alloy rims but then again this was at demos so I wasn't ridding those bikes as I'd ride mine.

  80. #480
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,938
    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    Why would this be so far fetched? Not all carbon frames ride the same, and "feel" is subjective anyway. I've ridden Enves on demo bikes, and haven't felt them that much different than my alloy rims but then again this was at demos so I wasn't ridding those bikes as I'd ride mine.
    Because there are too many variables to say it's the rim and carbon layups on rims are fairly simple. As was stated in another thread, if rims are flexing this much, then spokes would be snapping left and right. This isn't where you get to work seatstays and chainstay shapes to promote bending in one direction vs. another, you are "fixed" in the profile with a carbon rim, it's the same all around, because it has to travel in a circle. I would say that people perceive the increased "harshness" due to increased torsional and lateral rigidity, not vertical compliance or a lack of.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  81. #481
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by justinnardella View Post
    When the dt swiss spoke calc asks for ERD, should I enter the bed to bed ERD? Or one of the other ERDs. (I am looking on the US website).


    And I am trying to decide between the RM29C07 and the RM29C14. Seems a bit odd to me that the c07 is stiffer from side to side yet more vertically compliant (according to the comparison charts on the normal LB site). Isn't the the U-shape profile of the c14 supposed to be stronger overall than the more traditional profile of the c07?

    I am really leaning towards the c07 as I ride both enduro and xc on the same bike, and the c07 is considerably lighter imo. Any recommendations?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The bed to bed measurement should work for nipples with regular heads, but you should add to the ERD (2 or 3mm depending on the nipple) if you are using nipples with raised heads.

    If you use alloy, definitely used a nipple with a raised head and preferably Sapim nipples. Sapim uses a harder 7075 alloy, are anodized and heat treated so they are significantly stronger and have good corrosion resistance.

    The 29C07's flex laterally 9.8mm compared to 10.8mm for the 29C14's at the same pressure. The vertical stiffness deformation is more significant though (the 29C14's are quite a bit stiffer) so you will definitely feel more wheel stiffness on the 29C14's.

    Yes, the U-shaped profile coupled with a thicker bead area make the 29C14's stronger. We changed the fibre orientation on the 29C14's to make them with less vertical stiffness so it can help to absorb impacts and not be overly stiff. Whereas we tweaked the layup on the 29C07's to be stiffer than is the case with our standard layup because with that mold the design would normally lack a reasonable amount of stiffness. The mold shape and design is only one part of what makes a rim behave a certain way, the actual layup design plays a large part.

    I would go with the 29C07's if you aren't really hard on rims and prefer a more natural feel, but still want the benefits of carbon (ease of tubeless setup, increased stiffness, decreased weight...) The 29C14's are better if you want something with more wheel stiffness and is more on the enduro side of the spectrum.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  82. #482
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    284
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    We changed the fibre orientation on the 29C14's to make them with less vertical stiffness so it can help to absorb impacts and not be overly stiff.
    Can you provide more detail here? How much deflection are measuring? Are you testing with or without spokes?

  83. #483
    Just a flesh wound
    Reputation: Prophet Julio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    The actual measurement is mostly meaningless. How much does a Stan's Flow deflect compared to the new Mark 3? Or what about a WTB i29? What forces are you pushing onto the wheel/rim/tire? How does this relate to your own specific riding style and terrain?

    Wheel stiffness gets compensated, (mostly) through suspension tweaks. But if they say they have softened the wheel without sacrificing strength, or lateral rigidity, then I say "Technological advancement is fantastic"! I love my 650b, 38mm external rims. I had to adjust some settings to dial them in but Technological Advancements, in increments, are what makes us faster, every day. Directional orientation of the fibers is one of those incremental improvements.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  84. #484
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    284
    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    The actual measurement is mostly meaningless.
    Disagree. If the difference is 0.5mm vs. 0.7mm for an assembled wheel, then I'd argue that assessing vertical stiffness is a waste of time. Likewise if they're testing the rim by itself. Even with a carbon rim, spokes overwhelmingly provide the vertical support. Alloy rims that you could crush in your hands unassembled have almost no vertical deflection when part of a wheel.

    That rim/wheel differentiation isn't as true for lateral stiffness. The rim contributes much more to that, so a rim-only measurement would actually have some utility (albeit less than one that compared rims via wheels with the same spoke and hub configuration).

  85. #485
    Just a flesh wound
    Reputation: Prophet Julio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,099
    You are correct when you say that the spokes take the force. They take it all and distribute it to the rest of the rim/spoke combination (wheel). BUT carbon fiber rims are stiffer. They do change the vertical transmission of force to the suspension. There is less spoke tension variability on a CF wheel. However the "feel" is something that is subjective and I believe that the actual deformation number might be interesting, but still meaningless within the void of information regarding terrain, tire size, riding style and suspension. Oh, and wheel build... Do you have an algorithm that needs this data? I know that 28 spoke, light, 23mm internal aluminum rims are completely different than the 32 spoke, carbon fiber, 32mm internal rims that I have now. I do not know the actual difference in numerical analysis with regards to vertical or lateral stability. It is a big difference. But the incremental change from a CF hoop to another CF hoop is minimal and only marginally noticeable. The precise measurement is not useful unless the same information about other rims is also available.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  86. #486
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    284
    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    I do not know the actual difference in numerical analysis [between carbon and alloy] with regards to vertical or lateral stability. It is a big difference.
    To build on an earlier post by Jayem, if we tested the vertical stiffness of a wheel in isolation and construed lower numbers to mean better ride quality, I don't believe CF would differ noticeably from alloy. The absolute deflection numbers are so low that, absent tires, they'd both ride horribly stiff.

    However, ride quality might differ if we subjected the wheel to more realistic combined vertical and lateral forces, and accounted for CF's ability to maintain a more consistent rim shape after lateral impacts. A rim that's noodling all over the place isn't passing the full acceleration of a wheel impact to the rider. It would feel vague first, and perhaps, depending on the tire, a bit smoother. Put a clyde on a Crest and this is what I would expect to hear.

    This is all a long way of saying: I'm not convinced compliance on the vertical axis engineered into a rim means anything, because I don't think you can make a wheel compliant (independent of a tire) unless you introduce undesirable lateral weakness.

    This may be wrong. I'd welcome some technical input from LB on the background for that decision.

  87. #487
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by terrasmak View Post
    Wow, light is active here. Got questions but not for my MTB


    Can you get in Hope road hubs ? Wanting RRU45TO2 wheels , 20 spoke front 24 spoke rear, rim brake setup and on Hope hubs. Is it possible ?
    Hope road hubs are not in stock, we can get them from another company in about 5 days if you wanted to special order that. You can send an e-mail to support@ligthbicycle.com with your request and then we can send you an invoice link directly. Thank you!
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  88. #488
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    Were those alu nipples anodized?
    Yes, they were black anodized.

  89. #489
    www.lightbicycle.com
    Reputation: light bicycle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    Can you provide more detail here? How much deflection are measuring? Are you testing with or without spokes?
    There are a lot of variables with measuring wheel stiffness on a built wheel. We measure a raw rim so we do not have other factors influencing the results. For most tests we apply 50kg/f at a specific and controlled rate of speed. We perform the same test 4 times on the rim and rotate 90 degrees each time and then record the average result and also make note of any spikes. We can get vertical results ranging from 2mm up to 10mm in vertical deformation with the same amount of force, and from 6mm and up to 20mm of lateral deformation with various rims.

    I mentioned the vertical difference on these rims was pretty significant, on average it's 6.5mm for the RM29C14's versus 8.5mm for the RM29C07's. I know 2mm doesn't sound like a lot, but keep in mind you do not get as large of vertical deformation at the relatively low pressure and speed the machine is testing at. 2mm of variance on these rims is very noticeable to a discerning rider when all wheel build factors are identical and only the rim is different.

    We build wheels using the same build specifications but with different rim layup designs and have them test ridden. The rider feedback helps to reassure our mechanical findings before finalizing a given design or design change.

    We have performed thousands of theses tests on all of our carbon rims, so we have a lot of comparison data to look at. When we change any of our layup schedules, they go through many non-destructive and also destructive tests (similar but with more speed and more and more pressure until the rim breaks for example). You would be surprised how much changing the orientation of the fibres and the actual layup design influences the test results. For the 29C14's we are able to get the rim to flex more during ultimate vertical stress tests and the same change achieves better blunt impact tests on a built wheel, so at that point it makes sense to change the layup schedule. We can fine tune the layup and change the vertical behaviour without reducing the lateral stiffness results.
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  90. #490
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,520
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    Hope road hubs are not in stock, we can get them from another company in about 5 days if you wanted to special order that. You can send an e-mail to support@ligthbicycle.com with your request and then we can send you an invoice link directly. Thank you!
    Email sent , but had to correct your email address lol

  91. #491
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Radical_53's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    505
    Many people tend to forget adjusting their suspension. If there's a weight difference after changing wheels, suspension usually needs to be adjusted.
    This alone could make a ride feel "harsh".



    Gesendet von iPhone mit Tapatalk

  92. #492
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,134
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Because there are too many variables to say it's the rim and carbon layups on rims are fairly simple. As was stated in another thread, if rims are flexing this much, then spokes would be snapping left and right. This isn't where you get to work seatstays and chainstay shapes to promote bending in one direction vs. another, you are "fixed" in the profile with a carbon rim, it's the same all around, because it has to travel in a circle. I would say that people perceive the increased "harshness" due to increased torsional and lateral rigidity, not vertical compliance or a lack of.
    Vertical compliance in wheels is something that is commonly talked in about in road and mtb so not sure why u r downplaying it.

    Also are u not aware of Stan's carbon rims which have vertical compliance designed in? They have a little info page about it.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
    '12 Scott Spark 29 Team
    '13 Scott Scale 970
    '11 Scott Speedster S20
    '99 Spec' FSR Comp
    '9x Spec' Hardrock Cromo rigid

  93. #493
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    26,938
    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post

    Also are u not aware of Stan's carbon rims which have vertical compliance designed in? They have a little info page about it.
    I can't really take anything from Stans seriously, so no, not really.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  94. #494
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    284
    Thank you for this detail. It's unusual to see this sort of transparency, I appreciate it.

    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    2mm of variance on these rims is very noticeable to a discerning rider when all wheel build factors are identical and only the rim is different.
    For reasons I've expressed above, it would be useful to know how significant this difference is when the rim is part of a wheel. If the tire is deflecting 30mm, how noticeable can 2mm of rim deflection (or presumably much less for an actual wheel) be?

    Also, have you found the speed of the impact matters in your testing?

  95. #495
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,141
    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    Vertical compliance in wheels is something that is commonly talked in about in road and mtb so not sure why u r downplaying it.

    Also are u not aware of Stan's carbon rims which have vertical compliance designed in? They have a little info page about it.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk
    Vertical compliance is talked about, but more often than not the talk is grossly inaccurate BS. The idea that a wheel can provide desirable vertical compliance is a myth that has be debunked repeatedly. The Stan's video you reference shows a potential failure mode for rims. Designing a rim to survive such an impact is desirable; designing a rim to intentionally "flex" for the benefit of ride quality is an entirely different matter, and one that is essentially not achievable, because the vertical flexibility of the pre-stressed structure of a bicycle wheel is determined almost exclusively by the spoke tension.

    Two suggestions for you:

    a) do some reading on the physics of biccyle wheels. A decent, concise overview at Nox Wheel Building Philosophy and Other Info | Nox Composites
    and another MTBR thread (one of many) on this topic here: Wheel Flex Video

    b) give some thought to how a rider could conceivably feel the "give" of a rim. You have 100mm to 160mm of suspension happening. On top of that you have a deformable air bladder (aka tire) that can yield up to 40mm or more. Even the rubber itself can move 2mm or so under compression. Now, thru ALL of that movement . . . you really think that riders can "feel" the tenth of a millimeter difference in vertical deflection of a wheel?? (and that .1mm is under an unrealistic 3G load . . . trust me, what a rider is feeling at that point is NOT the micro deflection of a rim/wheel).

  96. #496
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,141
    Quote Originally Posted by alexdi View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    Yes, the U-shaped profile coupled with a thicker bead area make the 29C14's stronger. We changed the fibre orientation on the 29C14's to make them with less vertical stiffness so it can help to absorb impacts and not be overly stiff.
    Can you provide more detail here? How much deflection are measuring? Are you testing with or without spokes?
    @alexdi,
    Your observations and comments are spot-on. I agree with your statements in the thread here.

    I'm less impressed w/ the @light-bicycle comments. I suspect what we have here is a marketing person doing their best to communicate engineering objectives/data. And they almost got it right. Engineering the layup to provide sufficient flexibility to survive a major rock strike (or similar bottom-out scenario that completely de-tensions the spokes) is a good thing, and most of what @light-bicycle describes above relates to that attribute. But to suggest that part of the engineering objective was to contribute to ride quality by increasing vertical compliance of an unlaced rim is utter BS. No way an actual engineer -- from LB, or Nobl, or Nox, or Stan's -- would ever directly support such a statement. Whether they are cynical enough to stay silent while they watch marketing people assert such things? Well, my bet is yes, they will yawn and go back to the CAD work.

  97. #497
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    969
    So no one has any feedback about how these carbon rims ride compared to other brands? All the poetic/scientific waxing aside, I'm looking for rider impressions/opinions on rough terrain.

  98. #498
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,141
    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    I mentioned the vertical difference on these rims was pretty significant, on average it's 6.5mm for the RM29C14's versus 8.5mm for the RM29C07's. I know 2mm doesn't sound like a lot, but keep in mind you do not get as large of vertical deformation at the relatively low pressure and speed the machine is testing at. 2mm of variance on these rims is very noticeable to a discerning rider when all wheel build factors are identical and only the rim is different.
    I call BS on the portion I bolded above. First of all, a rider will almost never experience that deflection, and if/when they do, it will be under such severe circumstances that they will be facing far more dramatic "feelings" than 2mm of rim movement. The deflection figures you are comparing are from an unlaced rim. On the trail, the same deflection would require a major force that would bottom out the suspension and the tires simultaneously, resulting in the total detensioning of the relevant spokes. And during that massive G-out or cased jump or direct rock impact at 30mph or whatever, do you really think this "discerning rider" is making a mental note of 2mm of rim movement, and how it influences his ride quality??? Or are they trying to hold on, not crash, and generally survive the situation?

    I could potentially believe that a rare rider could distinguish the larger cross section RM29C14 rim from a RM29C07 rim in a blind test ride, assuming the wheels are built to identical pattern and tension with identical tires at identical PSI. I'm skeptical this is true, but I will allow the possibility. However, the differences they would potentially feel are NOT from vertical compliance under worst-case wheel deformation . . . it would be from lateral stiffness, or slightly wider bead position. More likely, it would be from placebo effect.

    Having said all that, I do think its great to see confirmation that LB is doing extensive testing and data collection on the rims. I ride your rims, I like your rims. I just caution you against making non-technical interpretations of technical data and asserting them as fact. And re-think whether you want to be on the riders-CAN-feel-vertical-compliance-of-wheels side of this debate.

  99. #499
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,141
    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    I tried searching the thread and on the forum but didn't find much. How is the ride quality of these wheels on rough terrain? I'm looking at the 650BC05 (30mm internal width) rims. If anyone is using the asymmetrical version (AM728), i'd like to hear ride quality comments on that too.
    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    I know that they're stiffer than alloy but not all carbon wheels ride the same. Enves have developed a reputation for being too harsh on rough terrain, for example.
    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    Why would this be so far fetched? Not all carbon frames ride the same, and "feel" is subjective anyway. I've ridden Enves on demo bikes, and haven't felt them that much different than my alloy rims but then again this was at demos so I wasn't ridding those bikes as I'd ride mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by matadorCE View Post
    So no one has any feedback about how these carbon rims ride compared to other brands? All the poetic/scientific waxing aside, I'm looking for rider impressions/opinions on rough terrain.
    What you're being told is that what you're looking for doesn't exist. But you still want to find it.

    You seem to be missing the point of the "waxing." You're asking for opinions about something that doesn't exist: discernible differences in "ride quality" on "rough terrain" among wheels that differ only in their carbon layup.

    Lateral stiffness can vary substantially between alloy rim wheels and carbon rim wheels, and that variability can be felt on the trail. Apparently some riders prefer less lateral stiffness than others, at least if you believe the Jared Graves comments. If you want a noodle-y wheel, then pick your alloy rim, keep your spoke bracing angles low (avoid Boost!), etc. Have fun.

    But if you believe more lateral stiffness and more strength in the wheel is generally all good, and you're trying to pick a carbon rim, then make your choice based on rim width versus your intended tire choices, price, reputation/data suggesting the rim is well engineered, reported ease of tubeless seating, customer service / replacement policy in the case of failure or damage, preference/familiarity to your preferred wheel builder, spoke hole design (reinforced?), etc.

    The myth of ride quality should literally NOT be on the list, and you seem to be putting it at the top. Suggesting that one carbon wheel feels harsher than another carbon wheel of similar design is BS . . . control all the other variables (terrain, speed, rim width, tire, lacing pattern, tensions) and then vary the tire PSI by 0.25 and you will produce WAY more vertical compliance than is contributed by the rims/wheels during any typical aggressive riding.

    But let me give a direct response to your question: I've ridden the sh&^ out of multiple LB and Nextie rims on all sorts of chunky terrain, and I've never felt any undesirable ride quality. All the wheels were laced 32H 3X to 110-120kgf tension. My human senses could not detect any "harshness" contributed by the carbon material differences . . . because my senses were being stimulated by 5" of suspension travel and 2.4" of tire carcass.

  100. #500
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    284
    Quote Originally Posted by InertiaMan View Post
    and another MTBR thread (one of many) on this topic here: Wheel Flex Video
    Great video. That's probably the most common failure mode: the load exceeds the spoke tension, the spokes slack, the rim looses lateral stability and, with a relatively small additional load, tacos (alloy) or breaks (carbon).

    If you wanted to avert that possibility for large impacts, it seems you could go one of two ways: reduce the rigidity of the rim so it can bend without breaking (Stan's approach above, the default for alloy), or add enough spoke hole reinforcement and hub flange strength to bear spoke tensions that would negate the scenario entirely.

    Carbon rims are so much stronger laterally that the overtension-to-taco problem with alloy should be a nonissue. The latter approach, combined with thicker, reinforced bead walls, would yield a very strong wheel.

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Carbon rims - Derby, Nextie, or Light Bicycle?
    By awai04 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 85
    Last Post: 06-03-2016, 05:59 AM
  2. My new Light Bicycle 27.5 Hookless carbon rims
    By beachbum1 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 78
    Last Post: 12-22-2015, 08:41 AM
  3. Light Bicycle carbon rims for Yeti 575
    By Tantrum in forum Yeti
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 11-15-2015, 07:51 PM
  4. Light Bicycle carbon rims leaking at sidewall
    By gozar in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 11-07-2014, 11:01 AM
  5. light bicycle carbon rims width??
    By CyclerDi in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-24-2014, 06:51 PM

Members who have read this thread: 694

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •