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  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    Hi Jave,

    The wider and deeper you go, the stiffer the rims will be. Also, if you get a reinforced version, the sidewalls are quite a bit thicker which also adds to the stiffness.

    If you are okay with the width, I think the AM724's would be a safe bet. They are not super tall or wide so they will feel more sturdy and faster than your alloy rims because they are carbon, but they won't be overly stiff. These have 3mm thick hookless beads and a modern profile so you won't need a reinforced version based on your description unless you visit the bike parks frequently and need them to handle high pressure.

    The main thing you want to watch out for (with any carbon rim) is to keep reasonable tire pressure. You don't want to go so low that you are bottoming out often, and not so high that you are voiding the advantage of a modern relatively wide rim.

    Riding fast through rough terrain is where advanced riders find a huge advantage in a good carbon rim. The bike will track better, be more stable and predictable.

    AM724 asymmetric rim profile carbon 650b mountain bike rims Light-Bicycle
    Sounds perfect! I'm looking to get a full wheelset, not just the rims but I don't see the AM724 as an option under wheelsets? Can you build one for me? If so, how do I order it on your website?

  2. #202
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    Replaced my DT wheels dt240/ex471 rims with LB asymmetric EN928 hoops and onyx hubs.



    Last edited by VitaliT; 07-15-2016 at 10:44 AM.

  3. #203
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    I'm on the 38mm external, 31.6mm internal rims. Probably have 750 miles on them. Fantastic upgrade. Super stiff laterally. They don't get knocked out of the line. I recently installed the Morsa 2.3's on them front and back. Incredible combination for up and down. I have taken them to Highland in NH for lift served, and they were amazing. When I first got my LB rims built up, they were different. My older wheels were softer and deformed more. I had to adjust my suspension settings a bit and I lowered my tire pressure. Once you get them dialed in, you will be amazed at the poise they have.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  4. #204
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    LB has some of their rims available in asymmetric rim profiles and non-asymmetric. I am looking at the 24mm inner width 650b rims, and they have that size available in asymmetric and non-asymmetric. The cost difference is pretty substantial so I am just wondering what the benefits are. $320 for a pair vs. $500, that's 35%.

  5. #205
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    The asymmetric design equalizes spoke tension on the wheels. Theoretically I suppose this builds a stronger wheel because you don't have spokes at such a high tension that they are less susceptible to breaking. But you won't notice a difference. I have the 38mm 650b rims, not asymmetric and I notice how much stiffer they are than my old aluminum rims. If they were changed for the asymmetric version, I bet I wouldn't notice.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  6. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    The asymmetric design equalizes spoke tension on the wheels. Theoretically I suppose this builds a stronger wheel because you don't have spokes at such a high tension that they are less susceptible to breaking. But you won't notice a difference. I have the 38mm 650b rims, not asymmetric and I notice how much stiffer they are than my old aluminum rims. If they were changed for the asymmetric version, I bet I wouldn't notice.
    You're probably right about the ride quality. I will say though, I'm not sure if it was the equal tension or what, but they were some of the easiest wheels to lace up I've ever built. They also seem to want to stay true on their own, Ive checked them a couple times without having to touch a spoke. I'll definitely be going with the assym on my next wheelset too, they've felt bulletproof.

  7. #207
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    The wheels I had built up with the LB 38mm rims have been perfect since built. They are still true and the tension on all spokes is good. I remember adjusting a couple of spokes for tension after a couple of rides, but the wheels were still perfectly true. No changes since. Nice rims. I can't vouch for their wheel building as I had mine done locally by a well regarded wheel guru.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  8. #208
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    Yeah, I'm pretty impressed with them so far for the price. I went with the 28/34 rims, but I'm hoping they will offer the assym in a wider version at some point. I have a couple friends with the 38 standard, and they've been really happy with them too. One had them built by LB, and he hasnt had any issues that I'm aware of. Nice to have a local builder you trust though, makes it much easier if there are any hiccups, or you want to swap hubs down the road.

  9. #209
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    thanks for the replies. I just bought a new set of Hadley's for a Spitfire I bought. Think I will go with the LB non-assym 24mm inner width rim. Should be a perfect compliment to my 27.5mm inner width FR570's on my DH bike.

  10. #210
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    well, nevermind. I emailed and they said the non-asymm version with 50g of material added won't be strong enough for all mountain/enduro type riding for a 185lb rider. they said i need to go with at least the 28mm inner asymmetric rim which is substantially more expensive. i was thinking i could upgrade to carbon rims for ~$330 versus ~$200 for aluminum. but with the asymmetric rims I'd be spending ~$570 with shipping. still not affordable enough for me to try them.

  11. #211
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    30mm internal too wide for you? The original i30 non-asym rims are great, and only like $10 more than the i24.

  12. #212
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    Quote Originally Posted by csermonet View Post
    well, nevermind. I emailed and they said the non-asymm version with 50g of material added won't be strong enough for all mountain/enduro type riding for a 185lb rider. they said i need to go with at least the 28mm inner asymmetric rim which is substantially more expensive. i was thinking i could upgrade to carbon rims for ~$330 versus ~$200 for aluminum. but with the asymmetric rims I'd be spending ~$570 with shipping. still not affordable enough for me to try them.
    Uh what? Both of those rims have 3mm thick beads and the non-asym 27.5 24mm inner width rim says:
    "specifically for down hill bike, AM & XC racing, tubeless compatible".

    Mind you, if you need a crash replacement of the asym (cracked after 1 year but before 2 years) the 25% discount will bring the Asym rim to $195 plus $45 for shipping so you're still ahead with the non-asym if you simply pay full price for a replacement.

    Sent from my LG-H810 using Tapatalk

  13. #213
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    Can we use the word "symmetric" to describe the rims that are not not-symmetric? Non-asymmetric is a double negative, and sounds like nails on a chalkboard to my ear. Whew. Really, I'm not a jerk, but had to get that out of my system.

  14. #214
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    Ha. It does sound weird now that you mention it. I used "asym" as a feature that one model has and one does not.

    Sent from my LG-H810 using Tapatalk

  15. #215
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    Get the symmetric 38mm / 31.6mm. They are not asymmetrically drilled. Hahahaha!!

    But they are less expensive and great for AM / Enduro.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  16. #216
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    So you guys think the original symmetrical i24mm with 50g added carbon would be durable enough for a 185lb geared up rider on all mountain/enduro type riding? LB told me they couldn't recommend that, and that they wouldn't honor the warranty. As far as inner width goes, my DH wheels are 27.5mm inner and I'm not trying to go above that. I'm also trying to wider than my previous trail bike wheels which were EX500's at 21mm. AFAIK, LB makes 3 rims that would meet my criteria for inner width. i24 symmetrical($163), i24 asymmetrical($249), and i28 asymmetrical($259). Like I said, they told me they can't recommend the i24 symmetrical RM650BC02 rim for me, and that they would not honor the warranty. The other two that they supposedly would recommend and honor the warranty, are out of my price range. It's not necessarily that they won't honor the warranty if I bust one, I'm used to voiding the warranty on many of my purchases. It's just the fact that they can't recommend it. I don't want to get them and have one break on me, especially when I know that cheaper Oozy 295's or EX471's won't.

    You guys have way more knowledge and experience than I do with these rims, and probably trail bike set-up in general. So i'll provide the link to the specific LB rims I was looking at, and you guys can tell me if you think they are okay for a 185lb all mountain rider.

    carbon mountain bike 650b rim mtb 27.5 rim Light-Bicycle

    Those are them, and keep in mind I was adding 50g of extra carbon to each rim for added strength and durability.

  17. #217
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    I'm anti non asymmetric.

  18. #218
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    I emailed them at the same time, further trying to clarify on the subject. and they replied and explicitly said they don't recommend it for me. I even said in the email, how it says in the description for the rim on their website that its for downhill, am, xc, etc. and they said "we haven't say the RM650BC02 is suitable for downhill riding on our website", even though it clearly states in the bottom of the description "MTB 27.5″ rim specially for down hill bike, AM & XC racing,tubeless-compatible". they further stated in their email "if you take all mountain riding softly, then go with the RM650BC02 heavy version."

  19. #219
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    That does seem odd, considering their description and the listed max weight limit. If they won't recommend or warranty it though, I wouldn't take the chance. They do look to be more consistent with their xc rims too, maybe the description is wrong? I wonder if the 20 mm depth has anything to do with it, it looks to be their shallowest rim in that regard.

  20. #220
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    I am curious as to your reasons for not going with a wider rim. I run 2.3's on my 31.6mm internal width rims and they perform great. The added sidewall stability is noticeable, and there is no penalty that I can discern. Just curious.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  21. #221
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prophet Julio View Post
    I am curious as to your reasons for not going with a wider rim. I run 2.3's on my 31.6mm internal width rims and they perform great. The added sidewall stability is noticeable, and there is no penalty that I can discern. Just curious.
    I just think rim width is a personal preference. I have been running pretty narrow rims, 21mm EX500's on the trail bike and 23mm Mavic 823. I have been wanting to go wider, but not drastically wider. The DT FR570 is pretty much the best aluminum DH rim on the market right now, and has the best strength to weight to width ratio. And they are 27.5mm wide. I just rebuilt my DH rims with these. The only enduro rim in the same league is the DT EX471, which Aaron Gwin used to run on his Demo in the World Cups, and they are only 25mm wide. I personally think this super wide thing is a bit of a fad. For instance Aaron Gwins use of the 25mm inner width EX471 rims, even choosing them when he had the option of running the slightly wider 27.5mm inner width FR570. And his new wheel sponsor, e13, only has rims with 27mm and 28mm inner width. Now 31.6 isn't so wide that I would consider it a "fad" rim width, I think it's well within the personal preference range. I fully think rim width is personal preference, and that can range all the way from 20mm to 35mm. But I think the industry is pushing wider is better, not pick what works best for you. And because of this some rim manufacturers aren't even producing what I consider normal width rims. For my trail bike rims, I definitely don't want them to be any wider than my DH rims, so that already off the bat limits me to no wider than 27.5 or 28mm. Just a personal requirement/preference.

  22. #222
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    I understand it's personal preference. I'm happy with my i30s, and have no desire to go wider (or narrower) because I like the way these ride. That said, I wouldn't hesitate to buy some i28 rims if they met all the rest of my criteria.

    Honestly, I don't believe any regular rider is going to notice a difference in 2mm of rim width.

  23. #223
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    Quote Originally Posted by amish_matt View Post
    I understand it's personal preference. I'm happy with my i30s, and have no desire to go wider (or narrower) because I like the way these ride. That said, I wouldn't hesitate to buy some i28 rims if they met all the rest of my criteria.

    Honestly, I don't believe any regular rider is going to notice a difference in 2mm of rim width.
    Yes I agree, I would be willing to with the 28mm wide rims. But the only ones they recommend and will honor the warranty are the asymmetrical ones, which are out of my price range. They make a 24mm asymm rim as well, but won't recommend or honor the warranty on that one either. In fact it appears they won't recommend any rim for a 185lb all mountain/enduro rider until it gets up to the 28mm asymmetrical rim.

  24. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by amish_matt View Post
    I understand it's personal preference. I'm happy with my i30s, and have no desire to go wider (or narrower) because I like the way these ride. That said, I wouldn't hesitate to buy some i28 rims if they met all the rest of my criteria.

    Honestly, I don't believe any regular rider is going to notice a difference in 2mm of rim width.
    I've had 2 seasons on 30mm id rims. Now I find I want to use some of the wider 29 tires for a front. A Fat B Nimble 29 x 3 is actually only a 2.7" tire and fits fine on my SID(or Reba) fork. Another new tire is the WTB Ranger 29 x 3. It may only be a 2.8.
    A 40mm id rim would be recommended for these and I'd like one, but my 30mm id works ok for the FBN now. A 28mm id rim wouldn't be better. I wouldn't choose that if building today.

  25. #225
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    I'm only recommending the 38 / 31.6 because it is designed for the use you want and it is much less than the asymmetric option. I totally agree with amish_matt that you really won't notice the difference in width from a 27.5mm internal to a 31.6mm internal. 5mm is less than a 1/4".
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  26. #226
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    I went from custom built EX500's straight to the 38/31.6 LB. I'm not getting the aversion to going with a proven hoop capable of handling what ever you throw at it and enjoying the benefit of better tire performance. While waiting for mine to arrive, I was a bit aprehensive about the width. Now that I've been running them since last September, I'd likely never go back towards the skinny. To each his own, I 'spose.
    Always ride with a purpose.

  27. #227
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    well like i've said, my aversion to upgrading to the LB carbon rims is the only ones the recommend are the asymmetrical versions which are far too out of my price range. You don't have to understand my aversion to running 31.6 inner width rims, it's personal preference. it's like you saying you like fat bikes, i'm not going to hold it against you, like you said to each his own. I prefer to stay between 24mm and 28mm inner width on my trail bike rims. the only thing holding me back is the price

  28. #228
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    Get the 31.6 mm internal and pretend they are thinner. Put a fake sticker on it. You will not regret it.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  29. #229
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    Quote Originally Posted by csermonet View Post
    it's like you saying you like fat bikes, i'm not going to hold it against you,

    I can assure you, I'll never say I like Fat Bikes. Ever. You can include eBikes in that, as well.
    Always ride with a purpose.

  30. #230
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    Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-more-bike.jpgLight Bicycle Carbon Rims-whole-bike.jpgSome pics of the rims you don't want (for some unknown unknown).
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-bike.jpg  

    Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-lefty-view.jpg  

    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  31. #231
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    Kinda agree with everyone else, if you don't want to pay the added premium, the standard 31/38 are pretty kickass rims. If you are really riding aggressive enduro type trails, I'd rather have the piece of mind over the grams saved any day. The weight of those RM650BC02 rims, combined with the depth and width, definitley sound more like XC rims anyway. That said, I went LB because of their track record over the years, and friends experiences. However, there are a bunch of other chi carbon rim makers that will sell you what you want without asking questions.

  32. #232
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    Quote Originally Posted by VitaliT View Post
    Replaced my DT wheels dt240/ex471 rims with LB asymmetric EN928 hoops and onyx hubs.



    I have the same combo on my sb6c..how do you like the LB vs the ex471?

  33. #233
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    Quote Originally Posted by csermonet View Post
    well like i've said, my aversion to upgrading to the LB carbon rims is the only ones the recommend are the asymmetrical versions which are far too out of my price range. You don't have to understand my aversion to running 31.6 inner width rims, it's personal preference. it's like you saying you like fat bikes, i'm not going to hold it against you, like you said to each his own. I prefer to stay between 24mm and 28mm inner width on my trail bike rims. the only thing holding me back is the price
    Usually this ununderstandable for us aversion comes from no actual ride experience to back it up. As has been mentioned, once you get some trail time on the right rounded profile tires at the right low pressure on wide rims things can change forever. This we could understand because it fits our own experiences. So we are trying to save you the wasted time and money with recommendations based on real trail time. But we could understand going to a WT Maxxis tire on the 31.6 for more downhill speeds with rocky terrain. Maybe a DHR II WT. Maxxis says--"Wide trail (WT) casing is optimized for 35mm inner width rims." So you maybe should even get a wider front. No way that tire will fit and perform on a 28.

  34. #234
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    Debating between 29C07 and AM928 for my process 111. I ride trails with small drops, some rock gardens and technical climbs. I ride fast but not too aggressive.
    What would you guys recommend between the two rims? And should i opt for the enduro version?

    Thanks!

  35. #235
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeti575inCA View Post
    I have the same combo on my sb6c..how do you like the LB vs the ex471?
    Updated pics.
    I had only three ride on those wheels about 150km. Weight is not a question because of onyx hubs. Wheels torsional stiffness is improved control is much sharper and Schwalbe tires in 2.35 and Conti. TK 2.4 look gigantic. One person asked if it is 29+


    Sorry I am noob in biking jargon on English.
    I’m so impressed in those hoops so I considering to get myself AM733 wheelset on same hubs to convert my carbine 29c to the 27+






    Last edited by VitaliT; 07-15-2016 at 01:36 PM.

  36. #236
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    I'd go for the AN928 between the two. You should also consider the 29C14. You would not need the heavy duty version of either the 29C14 or the AM928. The 29C07 is an old design. Thinner sidewall bead interface.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  37. #237
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    The 29C14 also gives you more id. This would be better.

  38. #238
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    Thanks Julio and eb1888. What do you mean by more id?

    Is there any advantage to the wider rim, given that the same tire is being used and the fact that the wider rim is heavier?

    Thanks again.

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    ID = inner diameter. I think the reinforced 30/24 rims should be fine, i dont see why the AM928 would be much stronger at the same weight. I prefer them because they are wider though.

  40. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by kozmokr View Post
    Thanks Julio and eb1888. What do you mean by more id?

    Is there any advantage to the wider rim, given that the same tire is being used and the fact that the wider rim is heavier?
    Well you're not restricted to just one tire, just like you're getting a new wheelset to improve performance.
    I now have a 2.7" Fat B Nimble front tire with a regular SID fork(Reba is the same clearance). But even with my round profile XR! 2.2 Team Bontrager rear the 31.6mm id rim makes a major difference. Traction, no foldover washouts, sidewall support and more cushion from lower psi are all positive benefits that more than outweigh a few grams.
    Carbon rims aren't $40. Don't waste your money on skinny pizza cutter rims you'll be replacing before you know it. Anyone who says 24 is fine has zero time on wide rims. Zero time means zero value.Their recommendation would change with just one ride.

  41. #241
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    I didn't read all the replies, but I'm going to go with DT EX471's. Shame, cause I do want to try out some carbon rims. Alas, I will be getting some at a later date. I assume that the price can only drop, and you will soon be able to get a quality, rated for aggressive riding carbon rim for the same price as a aluminum rim. Who knows when that will be though. Maybe next tax return season I'll treat myself to a carbon rim re-lace

  42. #242
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    Do you get anything from carbon at the same performance and price level as aluminum? Not as far as I'm aware.
    So if you want to wait, fine, but the drop has already been immense. I wouldn't guess it could drop more than a single-digit percentage from now on unless something big happens.


    Von meinem iPhone gesendet.

  43. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radical_53 View Post
    Do you get anything from carbon at the same performance and price level as aluminum? Not as far as I'm aware.
    So if you want to wait, fine, but the drop has already been immense. I wouldn't guess it could drop more than a single-digit percentage from now on unless something big happens.


    Von meinem iPhone gesendet.
    Yeah, that's why I said "Who knows when that will be though. Maybe next tax return season I'll treat myself to a carbon rim re-lace". For the level of performance I need, the price of entry in carbon, even from cheap China manufacturer direct, is just too high for me to afford right now when I have other components to buy as well on this new build. Maybe if I get a dece tax return, and don't have any unexpected expenses, I'll be able to get some. But right now, for $100 a rim, I just can't beat the performance for price.

  44. #244
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    You miss the package price.
    Right now you'd get two rims at 80-100$ each, spokes & nipples (depends, 50-200$?) and possibly pay a guy to build wheels of it.
    Then, next year, you'd buy all that again... Spokes and labor will be gone, you may get some money for the old rims.
    Then, you'd still need to pay the premium for carbon.
    If you get them now, you wouldn't only save money, but also gain the advantages a year earlier


    Von meinem iPhone gesendet.

  45. #245
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    Yeah but after close to a year of use my aluminum rims will be coming to the end of their service life anyway. Trust me, I want to get carbon rims. But i'd also like to upgrade my dropper from a KS eTen to something nicer, and I have had good luck with my WTB High Tail on my DH bike so I want to get one of those as well, and upgrade my cranks from the very base level Race Face Ride's to something like e13 TRS+. I also need to get proper tires, the bike came with singly ply Ardent's. I need at least Exo sidewall, probably a DHR2 or High Roller 2. If i didn't want to get all of that stuff right now, I would pay the premium for carbon. But right now there are too many other things. As you know, your bike is never really "done" lol. I will get carbon rims, just a matter of time.

  46. #246
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jave View Post
    Sounds perfect! I'm looking to get a full wheelset, not just the rims but I don't see the AM724 as an option under wheelsets? Can you build one for me? If so, how do I order it on your website?
    Sorry for the delayed reply! The page is made but it's not live on the site yet, just waiting on approval. It should be done within the week. In the meantime you can e-mail sales@light-bicycle.com or you can also use the wheelset order form located here instead of e-mailing:
    custom mountain wheels Light-Bicycle
    http://www.lightbicycle.com
    http://www.us.lightbicycle.com (North American site)
    Instagram: @lightbicycle

  47. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erock503 View Post
    You're probably right about the ride quality. I will say though, I'm not sure if it was the equal tension or what, but they were some of the easiest wheels to lace up I've ever built. They also seem to want to stay true on their own, Ive checked them a couple times without having to touch a spoke. I'll definitely be going with the assym on my next wheelset too, they've felt bulletproof.
    The 38's are so stiff and deep that they should stay true more easily. Shallower rims benefit from the asymmetric profile more as shallow rims have more lateral flex. More even spoke tension left to right will help keep the wheel truer for longer and the nipples won't loosen off as easily. The AM724 has an improved profile and a significantly different layup than the older RM650BC02. It will have better impact resistance and will be quite a bit stiffer due to the layup pattern coupled with being 4mm deeper. The Happy medium would be using the AM724 in the rear if the increased cost is concerning.

    Perhaps these are small details, but it should be noted that the asymmetrical rims are kept in stock so they can ship within a couple of days, PayPal fees are waived for these orders, and the crash replacement policy is improved on these rims.
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  48. #248
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erock503 View Post
    Yeah, I'm pretty impressed with them so far for the price. I went with the 28/34 rims, but I'm hoping they will offer the assym in a wider version at some point. I have a couple friends with the 38 standard, and they've been really happy with them too. One had them built by LB, and he hasnt had any issues that I'm aware of. Nice to have a local builder you trust though, makes it much easier if there are any hiccups, or you want to swap hubs down the road.
    We've got a 40mm wide asymmetric rim
    EN733 asymmetric rim profile carbon 27.5 inch carbon rims mtb Light-Bicycle
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  49. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by csermonet View Post
    I emailed them at the same time, further trying to clarify on the subject. and they replied and explicitly said they don't recommend it for me. I even said in the email, how it says in the description for the rim on their website that its for downhill, am, xc, etc. and they said "we haven't say the RM650BC02 is suitable for downhill riding on our website", even though it clearly states in the bottom of the description "MTB 27.5″ rim specially for down hill bike, AM & XC racing,tubeless-compatible". they further stated in their email "if you take all mountain riding softly, then go with the RM650BC02 heavy version."
    I'm sorry for the frustration on this, I've met with the team here and we'll work on a solution. I think we will try to make a replacement mold for the RM650BC02 at a similar width but with improved design features and strength. We'll design it with strength and a good price point in mind. I'll have the downhill description removed from the current mold, not sure why that is on there
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    Regarding this rim: AM724 asymmetric rim profile carbon 650b mountain bike rims Light-Bicycle

    It is suitable for all mountain riding and can handle hard riding if you are a responsible rider. If you are not destroying your alloy rims regularly than you should have not problem with these. I think it's important to remember that "warranty" doesn't mean if you manage to break a product while riding it is automatically covered. Warranty is intended for manufacturing defects.
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    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    When riders talk about rim width it's the internal width that impacts on the tire performance. This rim is only 33.6mm internal width. Plus tires of 2.8" to 3.0" and more are available today in 27.5 and 29 sizes. Rims with 40-45mm internal rim width are what the tire manufacturers are recommending and what the oem bikes are coming with. Where are your 40mm and 45mm asym rims for these tires? I'd prefer rims not taller than 25mm for these sizes.
    There is a carbon asym rim of 39mm id available on the market now for $195.

  52. #252
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    When riders talk about rim width it's the internal width that impacts on the tire performance. This rim is only 33.6mm internal width. Plus tires of 2.8" to 3.0" and more are available today in 27.5 and 29 sizes. Rims with 40-45mm internal rim width are what the tire manufacturers are recommending and what the oem bikes are coming with. Where are your 40mm and 45mm asym rims for these tires? I'd prefer rims not taller than 25mm for these sizes.
    There is a carbon asym rim of 39mm id available on the market now for $195.
    Hello,

    The 40mm rim with 33.6mm internal width works just fine with plus tires, and they also work well for modern wide-rimmed compatible tires like the line Maxxis has released (Wide Trail). This keeps the bike versatile without the need to change wheels. For riders preferring a very wide rim for plus to bring it a bit closer to the fatbike end of the spectrum, we have a 45mm internal width rim and it's available in 29" and 650b. carbon mountain bike rim-mountain bike rim,mountain rims,mtb rim,mtb rims,carbon mtb rim Light-Bicycle

    The plus rims we have can easily be drilled with spoke holes offset to one side to create more even spoke tension and create the asymmetrical effect. These are so wide that the profile does not really need an offset shape to accomplish the effect.

    There is a gap in the lineup with room for a 38-40mm internal width perhaps in the future we'll make something here, but for now we've got a 33.6 and a 45 inner for 650 and a 31.6 and a 45 inner for 29".
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  53. #253
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    Hi LB,
    I am currently looking for two pairs of wheels for two all mountain bikes. One for my girlfriend and one for me. Both bikes are new modern 150mm travel machines which will be used for easy trail riding. From time to time we plan to do some easier downhills in bike parks, some light jumping. as the time will go and once we improve our skills we might use the bikes in more demanding terrain. We will be using bikes for all day trips in the Alps, so weight is important as well. Our riding weight is around 55kg and 80kg for my girlfriend and me respectively. My girlfriend usually rides on a safe side, I would say she is never aggressive on trails, myself I like to let my suspension do the work in rock gardens but I always keep some safety margin. We are planning to ride probably some nobby nics 2,35, trail kings 2.4 or similar Maxxis 2.3-2.4 tires for our trail riding. We might use something heavier with more meat and protection for bike park runs.
    We were looking at AM724, AM728 and EN728 rims but we were just curious what would you and folks here with experience suggest...
    Any help is always appreciated.
    Which rims would you guys suggest for us?

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    Quote Originally Posted by palo_lude View Post
    Hi LB,
    I am currently looking for two pairs of wheels for two all mountain bikes. One for my girlfriend and one for me. Both bikes are new modern 150mm travel machines which will be used for easy trail riding. From time to time we plan to do some easier downhills in bike parks, some light jumping. as the time will go and once we improve our skills we might use the bikes in more demanding terrain. We will be using bikes for all day trips in the Alps, so weight is important as well. Our riding weight is around 55kg and 80kg for my girlfriend and me respectively. My girlfriend usually rides on a safe side, I would say she is never aggressive on trails, myself I like to let my suspension do the work in rock gardens but I always keep some safety margin. We are planning to ride probably some nobby nics 2,35, trail kings 2.4 or similar Maxxis 2.3-2.4 tires for our trail riding. We might use something heavier with more meat and protection for bike park runs.
    We were looking at AM724, AM728 and EN728 rims but we were just curious what would you and folks here with experience suggest...
    Any help is always appreciated.
    Which rims would you guys suggest for us?
    I think you would be happier on the AM728's as the depth will give you good stiffness and stability through rock gardens. The extra width will give you a great profile for the tires you anticipate running and they will be hard to burp. If you run tires with thicker casing when at bike parks you should be able to get away with the AM version as they are still quite strong.

    Your girlfriend might feel that the 728's are too stiff and she would appreciate the weight savings of the AM724's. A 24mm internal width will allow her to run narrower tires for when conditions are good and she really wants to lighten up the bike for certain epic rides, and you can still easily run 2.4" trail tires with a 24mm inner. These will be easier to burp than the wider rims at lower pressure but it doesn't sound like she is overly aggressive so I wouldn't worry about that. I hope this helps!

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    Thanks LB,
    this does help a lot in fact. Especially appreciate explanation on wheel stiffness as I would forget about this.
    One more question. Is it OK to use plastic tire levers with your carbon rims?
    We can put tire on wheel without levers, but for taking tire off the rim, we like a little help of a lever.

  56. #256
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    I have a quick question regarding standard nipple drilling vs internal. Last set of LB wheels I've built up with internal nipples due to the presumed increased durability. The wheels have held up fine. I am about to build a new set; still undecided on the rim as like most I have a hard time swallowing the price up-charge on the asymmetric rim, and I'm undecided on whether to spec internal or standard nipple drilling.

    The advantage of standard drilling is the truing aspect, although my last set I've built up stayed dead true for the life of the wheels. What is LB's take on this? Do you see any failures of spokes pulling through the rim when drilled standard?

    Thanks.

    _MK

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  57. #257
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    Quote Originally Posted by palo_lude View Post
    Thanks LB,
    this does help a lot in fact. Especially appreciate explanation on wheel stiffness as I would forget about this.
    One more question. Is it OK to use plastic tire levers with your carbon rims?
    We can put tire on wheel without levers, but for taking tire off the rim, we like a little help of a lever.
    Hello again, Plastic tire levers are no problem to use on the rims.
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  58. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK_ View Post
    I have a quick question regarding standard nipple drilling vs internal. Last set of LB wheels I've built up with internal nipples due to the presumed increased durability. The wheels have held up fine. I am about to build a new set; still undecided on the rim as like most I have a hard time swallowing the price up-charge on the asymmetric rim, and I'm undecided on whether to spec internal or standard nipple drilling.

    The advantage of standard drilling is the truing aspect, although my last set I've built up stayed dead true for the life of the wheels. What is LB's take on this? Do you see any failures of spokes pulling through the rim when drilled standard?

    Thanks.

    _MK
    We build up our nipple beds to take more than 400 kg/f without the nipples pulling through. Normal spoke tension on the high tension side of the wheel is about 130kg/f on a built wheel so 400+ is pretty high. On our testing machine, the spokes usually snap long before the nipple could ever pull through the rim. Based on this, I see more benefit on going with regular nipples as it makes servicing easier. It is incredibly rare to have the nipples pull through.
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  59. #259
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    Thx.

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    I appreciate that light bicycle is on here to provide useful facts and feedback.

    My personal experience: A few years ago, after letting a few others be the first Guinea pigs, I took the leap of faith and bought some of the original Light Bicycle hookless i22mm rims. I've probably got around 5000 mi of pretty good riding on them. They're scratched up and look a little worse for wear, but they ride as good as the day I got them. The only thing I don't like about them is that when setting them up tubeless, the tire falls off the bead when all the air is let out. I've managed to work around the issue, but it is annoying. But I've never had a tire burp since I've owned them, so they must fit tight enough.

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    If LB is answering questions I'll fire off a few.

    Why is it almost impossible to mount tires to the two sets of LB rims (four in total) I have?
    (2) External width 33mm 26" HD layup and (2) 30mm 29" HD layup both hookless.

    Folding bead tires from Maxxis, Specialized and Schwalbe have all been a chore and have had to use a RubberMaid Brute garbage can to get leverage to mount them.

  62. #262
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    If LB is answering questions I'll fire off a few.

    Why is it almost impossible to mount tires to the two sets of LB rims (four in total) I have?
    (2) External width 33mm 26" HD layup and (2) 30mm 29" HD layup both hookless.

    Folding bead tires from Maxxis, Specialized and Schwalbe have all been a chore and have had to use a RubberMaid Brute garbage can to get leverage to mount them.
    Have you tried pushing as much of the bead as possible into the center channel of the rim? The little bit of extra slack produced allows you to get the last bit of the tire over the rim edge.

  63. #263
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCal-Rider View Post
    I appreciate that light bicycle is on here to provide useful facts and feedback.

    My personal experience: A few years ago, after letting a few others be the first Guinea pigs, I took the leap of faith and bought some of the original Light Bicycle hookless i22mm rims. I've probably got around 5000 mi of pretty good riding on them. They're scratched up and look a little worse for wear, but they ride as good as the day I got them. The only thing I don't like about them is that when setting them up tubeless, the tire falls off the bead when all the air is let out. I've managed to work around the issue, but it is annoying. But I've never had a tire burp since I've owned them, so they must fit tight enough.
    Which rims are these SoCal-Rider?
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  64. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    If LB is answering questions I'll fire off a few.

    Why is it almost impossible to mount tires to the two sets of LB rims (four in total) I have?
    (2) External width 33mm 26" HD layup and (2) 30mm 29" HD layup both hookless.

    Folding bead tires from Maxxis, Specialized and Schwalbe have all been a chore and have had to use a RubberMaid Brute garbage can to get leverage to mount them.
    How old is your 26" rim? We made new top plates for that mold a while back to lower the center channel slightly, and we also lowered the hookless lips to increase impact resistance. It is possible you have one of the rims before this revision.

    Which 29x30 do you have, is it the 29C19 or is it the 29C02 (no longer on the website?). I can't recall tire setup issues with either of these ones. If the tires are fitting tight, you need to make sure you are using a very thin tubeless tape. Gorilla tape is quite thick for example and make the tires fit too tight. It is shocking how much difference that bit of extra thickness makes. You can also run the tubeless tape in the center channel only, no need to cover full width if you use good quality thin tubeless tape. If you must use 2 layers to get enough strength, overlap them LEFT/RIGHT leaving about 2mm gap between the layers so that the edges are feathered out. This will help keep the tire from folding over the tape when you unmount tires. Kwarwick also had some good advice, you have to make sure to keep the bead in the very center so it has as much slack as possible. If you slosh around your tubeless sealant so it coats the tape or wet the tire beads with a tire fitting fluid, maybe that would help also.

    The HD layup does not effect tire fitting at all. The extra material is added inside the rim and the mold is the same as the light version, so all of the outer dimensions are exactly the same.

    Maxxis and Specialized tubeless tires are great and should not be the problem if they are in good shape. Schwalbe and Continental tires and some others have more inconsistent beads for use on hookless rims.
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  65. #265
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    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    Which rims are these SoCal-Rider?
    I don't know if they even had a model # back then. There was only one Light Bicycle 29er hookless rim to choose from back then.

  66. #266
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoCal-Rider View Post
    I don't know if they even had a model # back then. There was only one Light Bicycle 29er hookless rim to choose from back then.
    Yes those were amongst the first 29" carbon mtb rims made anywhere. Back then they didn't have a bead seat, it was just flat. You can make a false bead seat bump with tape which sounds like what you are doing currently.
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    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    How old is your 26" rim? We made new top plates for that mold a while back to lower the center channel slightly, and we also lowered the hookless lips to increase impact resistance. It is possible you have one of the rims before this revision.

    Which 29x30 do you have, is it the 29C19 or is it the 29C02 (no longer on the website?). I can't recall tire setup issues with either of these ones. If the tires are fitting tight, you need to make sure you are using a very thin tubeless tape. Gorilla tape is quite thick for example and make the tires fit too tight. It is shocking how much difference that bit of extra thickness makes. You can also run the tubeless tape in the center channel only, no need to cover full width if you use good quality thin tubeless tape. If you must use 2 layers to get enough strength, overlap them LEFT/RIGHT leaving about 2mm gap between the layers so that the edges are feathered out. This will help keep the tire from folding over the tape when you unmount tires. Kwarwick also had some good advice, you have to make sure to keep the bead in the very center so it has as much slack as possible. If you slosh around your tubeless sealant so it coats the tape or wet the tire beads with a tire fitting fluid, maybe that would help also.

    The HD layup does not effect tire fitting at all. The extra material is added inside the rim and the mold is the same as the light version, so all of the outer dimensions are exactly the same.

    Maxxis and Specialized tubeless tires are great and should not be the problem if they are in good shape. Schwalbe and Continental tires and some others have more inconsistent beads for use on hookless rims.
    LB,

    From my order email:
    RM26C03: 454g.453g.
    RM29C02: 405g.405g.

    It appears that both sets of rims I have are no longer made anymore.

    Myself and multiple people, including a respected bike shop all unsuccessfully attempted to mount wire bead Maxxis DH tires to the 26x33mm rims. Tried using sealant for lube, windex, wearing rubber palmed work gloves, etc.

    Which (thin) tubeless tapes do you recommend I try?

  68. #268
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Well you're not restricted to just one tire, just like you're getting a new wheelset to improve performance.
    I now have a 2.7" Fat B Nimble front tire with a regular SID fork(Reba is the same clearance). But even with my round profile XR! 2.2 Team Bontrager rear the 31.6mm id rim makes a major difference. Traction, no foldover washouts, sidewall support and more cushion from lower psi are all positive benefits that more than outweigh a few grams.
    Carbon rims aren't $40. Don't waste your money on skinny pizza cutter rims you'll be replacing before you know it. Anyone who says 24 is fine has zero time on wide rims. Zero time means zero value.Their recommendation would change with just one ride.
    Hmm. I wouldn't be so sure.
    There are some people around here who went back from wider rims to narrower, 25id. The main reason was the squared out tire profile and added weight.
    So there are still some who don't prefer the 30id +

  69. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by PUNKY View Post
    LB,

    From my order email:
    RM26C03: 454g.453g.
    RM29C02: 405g.405g.

    It appears that both sets of rims I have are no longer made anymore.

    Myself and multiple people, including a respected bike shop all unsuccessfully attempted to mount wire bead Maxxis DH tires to the 26x33mm rims. Tried using sealant for lube, windex, wearing rubber palmed work gloves, etc.

    Which (thin) tubeless tapes do you recommend I try?
    Orange Seal tape should be readily available. Wire bead DH tires would be very hard to fit, perhaps maxxis new tubeless ready tires with DD casing is the next best option to a full-on DH tire?
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  70. #270
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    Hi Light Bicycle. Just wondering if you have any tips on how to remove the tires from the rims the easiest way. I just had a flat tire yesterday and I couldn't remove the tire from the bead at all. By the way I'm using the lb 38 wide am rims.

  71. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by ibismojo09 View Post
    Hi Light Bicycle. Just wondering if you have any tips on how to remove the tires from the rims the easiest way. I just had a flat tire yesterday and I couldn't remove the tire from the bead at all. By the way I'm using the lb 38 wide am rims.
    I'm not sure what tubeless tape you used, but if you have a tight fitting tire try to use a thin tubeless tape and you can just apply it over the holes. You don't need to go over the bead seat as that can make it too tight for some tires.

    1. You need to drain the tire with air as much as possible and then screw the valve shut so that the vacuum pressure does not suck air back in.

    2. With your weaker hand, grab the tire from the top (you will be pulling upward and pulling inward). With your stronger hand, grab the tire with your palm near the bead (you'll be pushing upward and pushing inward). Position your hands side by side so they are working on the same spot to try and break the bead. Pull with the one hand and push with the other at the same time.

    3. If that spot does not work, reposition your hands to another spot and try again there and so on. Each time you move, be sure that the tire bead moves back down to the original position. If you manage to pull the bead half way onto the bead seat, that will make things tighter as it's a raised section of the rim (about 0.4mm taller).

    4. You can try different body positions to gain more leverage, or have a friend help
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  72. #272
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    HI LB is your rims possible use with Schwalbe procore system.
    Wil it void warranty?
    Procore inner chamber pressure require 4-6bar and your rims max allowed pressure is 35psi-2.5 bar

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    Quote Originally Posted by VitaliT View Post
    HI LB is your rims possible use with Schwalbe procore system.
    Wil it void warranty?
    Procore inner chamber pressure require 4-6bar and your rims max allowed pressure is 35psi-2.5 bar
    Hi VitaliT, I do not think we can warranty the rims used with Procore as it does add a lot of pressure to the rims, however we have a number of customers using the system for ~6 months+ without issues so far.
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  74. #274
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    Quote Originally Posted by light bicycle View Post
    I'm not sure what tubeless tape you used, but if you have a tight fitting tire try to use a thin tubeless tape and you can just apply it over the holes. You don't need to go over the bead seat as that can make it too tight for some tires.

    1. You need to drain the tire with air as much as possible and then screw the valve shut so that the vacuum pressure does not suck air back in.

    2. With your weaker hand, grab the tire from the top (you will be pulling upward and pulling inward). With your stronger hand, grab the tire with your palm near the bead (you'll be pushing upward and pushing inward). Position your hands side by side so they are working on the same spot to try and break the bead. Pull with the one hand and push with the other at the same time.

    3. If that spot does not work, reposition your hands to another spot and try again there and so on. Each time you move, be sure that the tire bead moves back down to the original position. If you manage to pull the bead half way onto the bead seat, that will make things tighter as it's a raised section of the rim (about 0.4mm taller).

    4. You can try different body positions to gain more leverage, or have a friend help
    Thanks LB for the reply.

  75. #275
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    so been thinking about the rims again, still not completely decided.
    can someone comment on how stiff a wheel with AM728 and/or AM724 rim will feel like? I just read some test description on some other carbon wheels and they described the feeling of riding the wheels similar to loosing like 1 inch of suspension travel and/or riding very high pressure tires... I am sure this is what I am not after. I do realize each wheel will have a different feeling and rider weight might be one of the factors as well. just was curious if someone switched from normal alloy rims and can comment on the amount of stiffness these rims introduce.

    @ LB also was thinking about bike transportation. I assume I will use some sort of hitch mounted bike rack. these use wheel straps. is this risk free and OK to do for your rims or should pinching of the rim be avoided?

  76. #276
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    I had my first ride with these rims in Thursday and since then, I've been riding them every day
    The precision seemed absurd at first but I got used to it rather quickly.
    I've never had a bike turn this quickly and this sharp before, it really blew me away. One of the best upgrades I ever did.
    So far, I couldn't feel any loss of comfort though. With 6" of travel and 2.35" tires I wouldn't have expected that to happen anyway, though.


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  77. #277
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    Rad, which rims did you get? Insane directional stability. right?
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  78. #278
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    What rims/spokes were you using before? What rim/spokes did you go to?

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  79. #279
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radical_53 View Post
    I had my first ride with these rims in Thursday and since then, I've been riding them every day
    The precision seemed absurd at first but I got used to it rather quickly.
    I've never had a bike turn this quickly and this sharp before, it really blew me away. One of the best upgrades I ever did.
    So far, I couldn't feel any loss of comfort though. With 6" of travel and 2.35" tires I wouldn't have expected that to happen anyway, though.


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    That's what I noticed with mine as well.

  80. #280
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    @prophet: Yes absolutely. Very very nice

    I've been running CX Ray spokes on my last two wheel sets. As the they weren't *that* much more than normal spokes I went with them again.

    I came from a set of original Stan's Flow rims (no EX) 26", now I'm running a set of RM26C03 with internal nipples.




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  81. #281
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    Quote Originally Posted by palo_lude View Post
    @ LB also was thinking about bike transportation. I assume I will use some sort of hitch mounted bike rack. these use wheel straps. is this risk free and OK to do for your rims or should pinching of the rim be avoided?
    This should not be an issue at all, but it may scratch the rims a bit if clamped in the same area over and over again (depending on the clamp and how much vibration happens). Perhaps a piece of inner tube positioned underneath the clamp would protect the rims from scratching.

    The main thing to watch out for when mounting a bike with carbon rims to a car is the vehicle exhaust. You don't want to heat up the carbon rims too much.
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  82. #282
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    LB XC923 (hookless) laced w DT240s

    Recently purchased this wheelset from Light Bicycle. I bought them to replace my Stans Race Gold wheels that are not practical on rocky courses (paper thin sidewalls). I am hoping these hookless rims will allow me to keep the pressure on the lower side and perform where the RG's failed. I haven't raced on these yet but they are very stiff and the tubeless setup only took about 10 minutes. Because the LB wheelset is slightly heavier (then what I'm used to) I will probably compete on 2. 1 Racing Ralph lite skins - this should save some weight...The wheels are similar in weight to the M50s from Envy but slightly heavier then the Valor's from Stans. My guess is that Stans is saving weight on the hubs...any chance LB will stock DT 180s?

    These pictures are 15/100 front wheels from Stans and LB (both include valves - Stans rim is tapped LB is not
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-img_5484.jpg  

    Light Bicycle Carbon Rims-img_5487.jpg  


  83. #283
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    I don't know where you ride, but the extra volume provided by the larger width rims should allow you to run lower pressure. You should mount up something as wide as you had or a bit wider. Weight is not the point of those stiff, wider carbon fiber rims. Flying through chunky stuff with ease is the thing they do best. They give you directional stability, much more that the ultra light set you had.

    I had Blunt SL's built with a Velocity Race hub and Lefty front hub. Like you first set, they were sub 1,400 grams. I am much faster on my LB set that weighs about 1,600 grams like yours.

    But I had to adapt to the new rims. They do not absorb anything. It's all on the tires and the shocks. I have had 2 different tires of 27.5 x 2.3's mounted, and I have been running 16 to 18 psi front and 18 to 20 psi rear. No pinch flats, no burps. The same tires from the skinny rims handled much better on the wide rims. The new tires, which are much more substantial, are incredibly fast for the rough, rocky and root infested trails of New England, (MA , VT and NH)

    I hope this helps. It's always about what works for you, so just trying to give you my impressions.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  84. #284
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    Stan's Valors saves a lot of weight BT using fewer spokes of a thin gauge. I think they use a custom made Sapim Laser that is actually thinner than the stock version. So if you use 32 spokes of reasonable thickness, your wheel might weigh more. I don't think Stan's publishes the wright's of their carbon rims.

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  85. #285
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    I just noticed that you got the asymmetric XC 923 rims. That should be a nice wheelset. Not much wider than your originals, but I bet they are much more direct and capable.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Prophet 650b with a Lefty.

  86. #286
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    Chris,

    Thanks for the information. It's interesting to hear you are faster with the "heavier" wheelset. I haven't really had a chance to use the LB wheels because I had to wait for a new thru axle hanger (from china) and now I am taking some time off. I live in NE as well so yes I am familiar w the rocks and roots! I will probably be running around 16 to 17 psi with the LB wheels (ran 17 with the RGs).

  87. #287
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    LightBicycle, for the LB38 rims, at what angle do you drill the spoke holes. I notice that my first set ( about 2 years old) do not have any noticable angle to the holes. Did this change over time. With 157 mm DH hubs, the spoke bends quite a bit at the nipple.

  88. #288
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    Not LB, but with a set of CB rims I had I could not see any angle looking a the spoke holes or the clearance holes in the rim bed. It was only when I put a close fitting rod into the spoke holes that it became obvious that they were drilled at angles, in agreement with the spec.
    Do the math.

  89. #289
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    Spent the last four days riding my XC923s (w 2.25 racing ralphs) and have to say they are awesome! Stiff and very fast...

  90. #290
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    Quote Originally Posted by heatstroke View Post
    LightBicycle, for the LB38 rims, at what angle do you drill the spoke holes. I notice that my first set ( about 2 years old) do not have any noticable angle to the holes. Did this change over time. With 157 mm DH hubs, the spoke bends quite a bit at the nipple.
    We did not drill angular holes in the past, but now we drill them at 5 degrees by default on mountain bike rims.
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  91. #291
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    Has anyone got a set of the 650b+ 50mm rims? I'm looking at these for a plus bike

  92. #292
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    Quote Originally Posted by Centurion_ View Post
    Common sense would dictate that wheels or rims you buy for...significantly less than half of market price for similar wheels or rims will fall short of the more expensive product, as will the warranty.

    If that's too much to grasp, do without, or shell out a couple grand for a quality wheelset from a company that will stand behind their product. At those prices, you would expect them to do so.

    At Light Bicycle or Carbon Cycle prices, you can't expect full warranty service. Oh they could do it. But then you'd be shelling out 2k for their wheels as well.

    Having a front wheel built with a LB 35/30 rim as we speak. If I break it, I buy an i29 rim and move on. But at $180 bucks for their rim, LB gave me the opportunity to try carbon. Something I can't justify doing otherwise.
    Hi

    from my experience (6 x sets of DH 38 wide 650b rims) their warranty has been very good.

    4 of the rims were for me 2 for a friend. my friend split the side wall after a big step up crunch at Pila but didn't notice until the end of the day. i took pictures and LB immediately warrantied. sent out a replacement no hassle.

    2 of the newer rims wouldn't seal correctly, they paid for a shop to try and seal with out success so they completely refunded me. (valve hole was slightly to big so i just used some silicone to seal the valve area, seems to work now.

    As to longevity, Nomad cc has been 2 seasons now, last year used as my DH bike, PDS , Tignes,les deux alpes, alpe d'huez France. Pila, Finale ligure Italy, Verbier, Crans switzerland etc not a single blip. Newer ones have taken a beating at the same places for this season and so far no issues.

    As you say for a sub 200 USD rim instead of 800 gbp its great value. furthermore ok for that 800 gbp per rim you get a 5 year warranty, just about everyone i know has had to use that warranty within the first year. for paying that much you really would hope for more, considering time off the bike, rebuilding the wheel etc.

    pretty sure most of these cheap Chinese rims are made using the same molds as other higher priced branded rims. IMHO id go Chinese any day over the big high priced brands.
    Last edited by Matt Gallagher; 08-24-2016 at 10:56 PM. Reason: missed out some detail.

  93. #293
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    How much do you weigh and how did it happen?

  94. #294
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    it was my friend, hes about 80 kg and he cased a big step up in Pila but didn't realise until later in the day that the rim was damaged. An ally rim would of tacoed and his day would of been over.

  95. #295
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpec29 View Post
    Has anyone got a set of the 650b+ 50mm rims? I'm looking at these for a plus bike
    Have some installed on my Carbon Fat bike frame with Dirt Wizard 3" tires are working great! Have a scratch on the rear wheel due to rock contact but it's only on the surface. Great Wheels.

  96. #296
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    Never had carbon rims at all. Thinking about these. I have a concern with the tire pressure I currently run. I use 27.5+ tires. 13 psi in the front and 14 psi in the rear. I've ran 14/15 and that seems too harsh and loss of traction for me. Is this too low a pressure for carbon rims?

  97. #297
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nash04 View Post
    Have some installed on my Carbon Fat bike frame with Dirt Wizard 3" tires are working great! Have a scratch on the rear wheel due to rock contact but it's only on the surface. Great Wheels.
    Isn't the 50mm a bit wide for a 3"? I am considering a 29+ bike purchase, and was looking for 40-45mm carbon wheels, but alas I see Light doesn't have one in that sweet spot.

    Would I be better off getting something just over 3" for the tire if I purchased these?

  98. #298
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    I have both 50mm with 3" tires and 70mm with 4" tires and I like the 50mm best.

    You could use this model; Carbon beadless 50mm wide 29 inch rims for 29 plus mountain bikes tubeless compatible Light-Bicycle

    Are you looking towards the inner width which is 45mm inner.

  99. #299
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nash04 View Post
    I have both 50mm with 3" tires and 70mm with 4" tires and I like the 50mm best.

    You could use this model; Carbon beadless 50mm wide 29 inch rims for 29 plus mountain bikes tubeless compatible Light-Bicycle

    Are you looking towards the inner width which is 45mm inner.
    Yep, that's the one. Man these are tempting...

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  100. #300
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    LB, Sent you a request through your custom wheel build page but haven't got a response as of yet?

    Are you guys on vacation this week?

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