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  1. #1
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    Industry 9 spoke reliability?

    I'm considering a set of I9 Torch wheels. A riding buddy has a set of I9's and had had problems with spokes breaking. He thinks that the alloy spokes become brittle over time and then break easily. On the other hand, a friend who owns a bike shop doesn't think they fatigue any quicker than any other spokes. What's the experience here?

  2. #2
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    Industry 9 spoke reliability?

    My current I9's are 5 years old. I have had no problems with random spoke breakage. I have broke spokes on rocks or other trail debris but I believe any spoke would have failed under these conditions.
    Nothing to see here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu View Post
    I'm considering a set of I9 Torch wheels. A riding buddy has a set of I9's and had had problems with spokes breaking. He thinks that the alloy spokes become brittle over time and then break easily. On the other hand, a friend who owns a bike shop doesn't think they fatigue any quicker than any other spokes. What's the experience here?
    Your friend would be incorrect - alloy does not become any more brittle over time and then break easily.

    I have had 2 sets of I9 for over 5 years, and have not yet broken a spoke. They are a superb product, and should be considered if looking at buying a high end wheelset.

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    I know folks who have had issues breaking I9 spokes and folks who haven't. I9 has taken care of all of them with their incredible customer service.
    System wheels aren't for me, but I think I9 backs up their product to the extent that it shouldn't be that big of a consideration.

    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    Your friend would be incorrect - alloy does not become any more brittle over time and then break easily.
    Yes it does. Aluminum is MUCH more susceptible to fatigue than steel. I'm assuming by "alloy" you mean aluminum (both aluminum and steel are alloys).
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    I know folks who have had issues breaking I9 spokes and folks who haven't. I9 has taken care of all of them with their incredible customer service.
    System wheels aren't for me, but I think I9 backs up their product to the extent that it shouldn't be that big of a consideration.


    Yes it does. Aluminum is MUCH more susceptible to fatigue than steel. I'm assuming by "alloy" you mean aluminum (both aluminum and steel are alloys).
    susceptible to fatigue VS "becoming MORE brittle over time" are two completely different things. Neither become more brittle over time (at least not in the lifespan of a wheelset) The statement that was made is that alloys become more brittle over time.

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    Industry 9 spoke reliability?

    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    susceptible to fatigue VS "becoming MORE brittle over time" are two completely different things. Neither become more brittle over time (at least not in the lifespan of a wheelset) The statement that was made is that alloys become more brittle over time.
    Fatigue failures are brittle failures, and to the extent that fatigue makes brittle failures more likely, even in normally ductile materials, it makes them more brittle by definition.
    Steel that is highly fatigued is more likely to have a brittle fracture. It has become brittle due to fatigue, which happens over time. The more susceptible a material is to fatigue, the more pronounced and quicker this phenomenon takes place.
    Therefore "susceptible to fatigue" and "become brittle over time " are not two completely different things but two ways of saying essentially the same thing.
    Also, most spoke failures are fatigue failures, so it is absolutely something that happens during the life span of a wheelset.
    Last edited by meltingfeather; 07-23-2013 at 09:02 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
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  7. #7
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    If you're worried about the alloy spokes just get someone to build you some wheels using the Torch Classic hubs. All the benefits of the 120pt engagement freehub without any proprietary spokes to worry about, and whatever rims you want.

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    I've had a set for 3 years, took some big spills, ran across branches, but no broken spokes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabrabu View Post
    I'm considering a set of I9 Torch wheels. A riding buddy has a set of I9's and had had problems with spokes breaking. He thinks that the alloy spokes become brittle over time and then break easily. On the other hand, a friend who owns a bike shop doesn't think they fatigue any quicker than any other spokes. What's the experience here?
    Your friend would only be correct if the Al spokes went beyond the elasticity point of the alloy used. This won't happen in normal use and building.

    Now, stainless spokes, will have a different problem. They can "work harden" and become brittle. Again, you would have to take them way outside their normal work stresses of a wheel.

    Does your friend work for DT Swiss or Sapium? Anyway, the torch wheels would serve you fine.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    Your friend would only be correct if the Al spokes went beyond the elasticity point of the alloy used. This won't happen in normal use and building.

    Now, stainless spokes, will have a different problem. They can "work harden" and become brittle. Again, you would have to take them way outside their normal work stresses of a wheel.
    Why do you guys sling out this crap info? Where do you get it?
    Aluminum work hardens... and it is susceptible to fatigue, which means it becomes brittle over time.
    If you had taken materials science this stuff is covered in the the 101 course.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    Why do you guys sling out this crap info? Where do you get it?
    Aluminum work hardens... and it is susceptible to fatigue, which means it becomes brittle over time.
    If you had taken materials science this stuff is covered in the the 101 course.
    +1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgaddis1 View Post
    If you're worried about the alloy spokes just get someone to build you some wheels using the Torch Classic hubs. All the benefits of the 120pt engagement freehub without any proprietary spokes to worry about, and whatever rims you want.
    This is the way I went... on Stans. The benefit is that you don't have a proprietary hub and spoke setup. I love them, but the drawback is you loose a TON of sexy points.
    ​mountain biking is fun.

  13. #13
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    Re: Industry 9 spoke reliability?

    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    Why do you guys sling out this crap info? Where do you get it?
    Aluminum work hardens... and it is susceptible to fatigue, which means it becomes brittle over time.
    If you had taken materials science this stuff is covered in the the 101 course.
    I think the point is that AL will fatigue but when used in a properly laced and tensioned wheel it should not be an issue as it is not being stressed to its limit... Most of the time.
    Here is the thing about equality, everyone's equal when they're dead. - Gavroche, Les MisÚrables

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    Why do you guys sling out this crap info? Where do you get it?
    Aluminum work hardens... and it is susceptible to fatigue, which means it becomes brittle over time.
    If you had taken materials science this stuff is covered in the the 101 course.
    I think we are splitting hairs on what material terms to use. I did take the mateials classes.

    I was trying to keep it simply for the OP. Most people see Al bend, hence,the term elasticity. SS tends to work harden when you hit it, cut it, or bend it.

    Since none of this should happen in a normal wheel set up, the Al spokes are fine. If Al spokes sucked as spokes, then my Mavic wheel would have colapsed yrs ago as I beat piss out of it.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  15. #15
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    Industry 9 spoke reliability?

    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    I think we are splitting hairs on what material terms to use. I did take the mateials classes.
    You're terms are dead wrong. It's pretty simple.

    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    I was trying to keep it simply for the OP. Most people see Al bend, hence,the term elasticity. SS tends to work harden when you hit it, cut it, or bend it.
    Whatever... you over-complicated it.. with bogus information.
    This s**t you're slinging (still) makes no sense.
    "Most people see Al bend"? Really? WTF does that mean, pray tell?

    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg View Post
    Since none of this should happen in a normal wheel set up, the Al spokes are fine. If Al spokes sucked as spokes, then my Mavic wheel would have colapsed yrs ago as I beat piss out of it.
    Ah... Mavic homer... I get it now.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
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