Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424

    I don't get this comment about Mavic 819's (from Bicycle Wheel Warehouse)

    I think this might be a joke I'm not getting or something.... In my research for a new wheelset, I've been to Bicycle Wheel Warehouse to check out their prices and builds for Mavic 819 rims and find this:

    Product Information

    Living on the cusp of the greatest era of information exchange the world has ever known; more information is generally preferable to scant details. Having said that, anyone seriously considering purchasing this wheel set should already know what this set is all about. There is no new information regarding the Mavic 819 UST tubeless rims to contribute. Be wary, these rims are not for everyone, but for those who prefer them, they are everything.


    Here's the URL for this quote:

    http://www.bicyclewheelwarehouse.com.../prod_104.html

    I actually emailed them a couple of weeks ago asking what they meant by "Be wary, these rims are not for everyone....." but no response.

    To further confuse me, they have a hot link to a David Hasselhof website in the blurb...!

    Just wondering what I'm missing?
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  2. #2
    3 Legged Big Top
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    640
    I'd say the hot link is just a joke about the greatness of Hasselhof

    "but for those who prefer them, they are everything."

    I read it as nothing has changed since the rim was introduced. " Not for Everyone" some want ultralight. some dont mind a lot of tinkering to get a tubeless setup sealed. The end weight is all they are concerned with.

    819 is not your lightest or cheapest rim. It is however very durable and easy to setup tubeless. there are no nipple/spoke holes on the inner channel to worry about sealing up. For me its simple. Install tire, fill with some stans, inflate, and ride the hell out of it. No tinkering no horsing around to keep it inflated. So yes its a little heavier unless your ultralight wheelset buckles under your or it cant hold air and you have to carry them out.

    I've be following your quest for wheel upgrade, I doubt the 819 will disappoint.

    Are you considering any other rims at this time?

    C

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by Curtis C View Post
    I'd say the hot link is just a joke about the greatness of Hasselhof

    "but for those who prefer them, they are everything."

    I read it as nothing has changed since the rim was introduced. " Not for Everyone" some want ultralight. some dont mind a lot of tinkering to get a tubeless setup sealed. The end weight is all they are concerned with.

    819 is not your lightest or cheapest rim. It is however very durable and easy to setup tubeless. there are no nipple/spoke holes on the inner channel to worry about sealing up. For me its simple. Install tire, fill with some stans, inflate, and ride the hell out of it. No tinkering no horsing around to keep it inflated. So yes its a little heavier unless your ultralight wheelset buckles under your or it cant hold air and you have to carry them out.

    I've be following your quest for wheel upgrade, I doubt the 819 will disappoint.

    Are you considering any other rims at this time?

    C
    Hi Curtis--thanks for the input.

    I'm still pretty focused on the 819's. JeffJ was the first to recommend them to me (along with Stan's Flows) and I think they are probably just about ideal. I don't care about weight that much and the durability and ease of tubeless-ness (!) really appeal to me. I don't do a lot of heavy-duty riding, but I'm around 210 lbs, so I definitely want something that can handle some abuse.

    I guess someone at BWW has a better sense of humor than I....
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  4. #4
    Old school BMXer
    Reputation: Blaster1200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,678
    It's a fairly strong rim that's fairly heavy (500 grams with nipple inserts), and it's fairly narrow for a 500 gram rim. If you want a narrow UST rim that's strong and you plan on using narrow tires, since the larger tires have a poor profile on the narrow rims, the 819 is for you. So I do agree that the 819 is for a unique customer. Having said that, for that specific application, the 819 is a really good rim.

    Yeah, they should have explained that better. I guess that's what you get for a 'company' that works out of a residential apartment.
    May the air be filled with tires!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    498
    Mavic does not make a tubeless rim in the 21 mm width. They make the 819 and the 823. In tubed rims they make a 17, 19, 21 and etc width rim. About 8% of the population really likes the 21 mm width aka Mavic 521 like rims (or wider). The other 92% discover that the 819 is a very good match for their needs.

  6. #6
    HTFU!
    Reputation: S.O.B.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    726
    Interesting that BWW did not reply. I emailed to ask them a question about a 29er wheelset about a month ago and I also did not get a response. I had no problem purchasing a wheelset from them over a year ago, but then I simply ordered the wheelset..no questions. Too bad they never responded, I ended up purchasing a wheelset elsewhere.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    658
    I have beat up my 819's and they are strong! I do like to run a 2.35/2.4 front tire and the profile is not ideal. I have Stan's Flows also as my trainer set on the Epic. The profile difference of a 21mm rim is noticeable. I can't comment on the strength of the Flows since they don't get pounded like the 819's on my Enduro.

    The no hassle of a true UST rim is really nice
    www.quinnphoto.smugmug.com
    07 S-Works Enduro SL - Sold
    08 Epic Marathon - Sold
    2012 Stumpy EVO 29er frame up build

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by IMHO View Post
    Interesting that did not reply. I emailed to ask them a question about a 29er wheelset about a month ago and I also did not get a response. I had no problem purchasing a wheelset from them over a year ago, but then I simply ordered the wheelset..no questions. Too bad they never responded, I ended up purchasing a wheelset elsewhere.
    I got a quote for 819's with Hope hubs from Red Barn Bicycle that sounds pretty reasonable to me (~$575 + shipping). BWW doesn't have the Hopes as one of the options on their site, so purchasing from them isn't an option unless I change my mind on configuration.

    Quote Originally Posted by bquinn View Post
    I have beat up my 819's and they are strong! I do like to run a 2.35/2.4 front tire and the profile is not ideal. I have Stan's Flows also as my trainer set on the Epic. The profile difference of a 21mm rim is noticeable. I can't comment on the strength of the Flows since they don't get pounded like the 819's on my Enduro.

    The no hassle of a true UST rim is really nice
    Well, I'm pretty much a newb and looking to upgrade the Mavic Crossrides that came with my bike at some point and I've been concentrating on the 819 with Hopes due to advice I've gotten here from trusted sources. The consensus on best rims from me seems to be either 819's or Flows and the fact that 819's are UST and have a reputation for being fairly indestructible pushes the balance towards 819's. If a great deal on Flows came up I'd probably be OK with them also. My understanding is the Flows might be a bit better riding (wider and a little lighter?), but a little less durable. And the Hopes seem to be the best bang for the buck AND can be configured for through-axles both front and rear (15mm and 12x142mm), so not having the budget or the need for Chris King's, or i-9's, the Hopes seem like the next best bet?

    BWW seems to have a lot of satisfied customers here, so they are probably an OK (at least) vendor, but since discovering and talking with Red Barn (Chad Devalls) I feel real comfortable working with them. BWW's comments on 819's might just be a bit of an inside joke that's beyond newbs like me All the comments here about the 819's are helpful and appreciated.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by Blaster1200 View Post
    It's a fairly strong rim that's fairly heavy (500 grams with nipple inserts), and it's fairly narrow for a 500 gram rim. If you want a narrow UST rim that's strong and you plan on using narrow tires, since the larger tires have a poor profile on the narrow rims, the 819 is for you. So I do agree that the 819 is for a unique customer. Having said that, for that specific application, the 819 is a really good rim.

    Yeah, they should have explained that better. I guess that's what you get for a 'company' that works out of a residential apartment.
    Well, I'm a newb rider and really don't beat up the bike except for crashes and falls, which are getting rarer as I get the hang of things and know my limits better. Bike is a Yeti ASR 5 (2010 alloy frame, Enduro build). I'm 210 lbs without gear, but losing weight. The bike came with Mavic Crossrides, which are inexpensive, but apparently a bit better than what I first suspected. I got the 12 x 142mm rear axle upgrade for the ASR, although that's also something that I probably don't NEED at this level. Obviously can't convert the rear with the current wheels, so I'm doing my homework for when the time is right.

    I am curious about the Flows, or a wider rim. The tires that came with the bike are Fat Alberts 2.25" (57-559) front and rear specific. They also seem fine to me. I don't know whether I would benefit from using a wider tire in the front. If so, that might be the single most important factor in choosing Flows over 819's. Cost-wise I don't think there's much difference between the two rims with Hopes---Flows might be a tad cheaper even.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    658
    I had my 819's built up with DT 240 rear, 340 front. These wheels have app 1,500 miles with a TON of slow 3-4ft drops to flat on my Enduro. My LBS built them for me.

    I know my Flow's are lighter and wider, and if I rode them on my Enduro with the same results I would prob suggest them instead. The price is prob gonna be better too.

    What I'm saying??? I don't think you can go wrong with either
    www.quinnphoto.smugmug.com
    07 S-Works Enduro SL - Sold
    08 Epic Marathon - Sold
    2012 Stumpy EVO 29er frame up build

  11. #11
    transmitter~receiver
    Reputation: meltingfeather's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    8,133
    I think one important thing to point out about 819s and tubelessness is that they were designed to work tubeless with UST tires. They are not very good at converting standard tires to tubeless.
    If you want to run UST tires only, a UST rim (819) is your best bet for tubeless.
    The Bontrager Duster, if you can find a pair, is a UST-spec alternative that is wider than the 819 and costs a good bit less.
    If you want to run standard tires tubeless, Stan's rims generally perform better than UST.
    Last edited by meltingfeather; 06-27-2011 at 09:16 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  12. #12
    I wonder why?
    Reputation: i1dry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    551
    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    I think one important thing to point out about 819s and tubelessness is that they were designed to work tubeless with UST tires. They are not very good at converting standard tires to tubeless.
    If you want to run UST tires only, a UST rim (819) is your best bet for tubeless.
    The Bontrager Duster, if you can find a pair, is a UST-spec alternative that is wider than the 819 and costs a good bit less.
    If you want to run standard tires tubeless, Stan's rims generally perform better than UST.
    +1 on Meltingfeather's comments.....

    Personally, given the OP's weight, I'd go the Bontrager Duster route (with TLR strips) and run wider tires at a lower psi. I'm only 165 lbs with gear and after running Mavic's with narrower tires for years I switched to the Dusters with wider tires and I wouldn't go back. From my experience, the Duster's provide greater optimal tire versatility and performance over the narrower Mavic rims.

    i1dry?
    Last edited by i1dry; 06-28-2011 at 07:06 AM.
    ...some drink from the fountain of knowledge..some only gargle...!!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    I think one important thing to point out about 819s and tubelessness is that they were designed to work tubeless with UST tires. They are not very good at converting standard tires to tubeless.
    If you want to run UST tires only, a UST rim (819) is your best bet for tubeless.
    The Bontrager Duster, if you can find a pair, is a UST-spec alternative that is wider than the 819 and costs a good bit less.
    If you want to run standard tires tubeless, Stan's rims generally perform better than UST.
    Quote Originally Posted by i1dry View Post
    +1 on Meltingfeather's comments.....

    Personally, given the OP's weight, I'd go the Bontrager Duster route (with TLR strips) and run wider tires at a lower psi. I'm only 165 lbs with gear and after running Mavic's with narrower tires years I switched to the Dusters with wider tires and I wouldn't go back. From my experience, the Duster's provide greater optimal tire versatility and performance over the narrower Mavic rims.

    i1dry?
    Thanks very much for this info. I wasn't aware that non-UST tires would present a problem on the 819's--somehow I assumed that they would work BEST with UST-specific tires, but OK with a wide range of tires. I noticed that the Schwalbe web site has announced that ALL their current trail tires are "tubeless-compatible" (not their Freeride/Downhill tires) so I was thinking I could have a good selection of tires to choose from.

    I'll check into the Bontrager Dusters, but have a feeling I may end up with Stan's Flow's--maybe trade a little durability for a wider tire option.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  14. #14
    Singletrack Addict!!!
    Reputation: Relayden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    872
    I must say, I've converted about 6 different non-UST tires on the 819 with no problem. then again I'm 180 with gear. Chk chainreactioncycles.com for a good price, usually close to $500 shipped.
    The world needs a huge socio-economic change...be it. We all need to ride more....

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CFoster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    166
    Hi guys,

    I've enjoyed reading through this thread. Porschefan, the MTBR community is one of the best out there, tons and tons of great advice from similarily interested enthusiasts.

    Curtis C hit it on the head, the Hasselhof link was posted after an awe inspiring Roast on the Comedy Channel of the Legendary, One and Only? Did anyone else see that? I liked how, after the first 8 minutes, the comics realized they ran out of Hoff content, so they just started burning each other. Standard roast fare, but usually they atleast wait 'til the first commercial break.

    Sorry that we missed emails, it's something that we're not proud of, but it's really tough for us to manage consistently.

    The Mavic XM819 is really a specialty rim. Plenty of other options out there that are cheap, easier to work with, stronger, etc. etc. Melting Feather's point about the 819 is meant for UST tires IS the biggest selling point of the 819. You buy a really nice set of UST tires purposed for your local terrain, and the UST tires/rim sidewall locks together so you can run low air pressure with confidence. If you're not familiar with UST rims/tires, getting the hang of inflating your tire and locking it into the sidewall the first few times is a bit of a challenge, but once you figure it out it's not too bad. It's not a process the casual rider will enjoy though.

    So, the 819 is a really exceptional rim, IF you use it for it's intended purpose. Else, the 719 is every bit as competent, but will easily work with a wider range of tires. As soon as you deviate from the 819 though, there's a whole world of rim options, virtually any of which can be converted to run tubeless, (some are easier than others), so you'll want to find the best width rim, weight, price, finish that makes sense for you.

    Now that the Hoff is out of the bag, we'll take it down.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by CFoster View Post
    Hi guys,

    I've enjoyed reading through this thread. Porschefan, the MTBR community is one of the best out there, tons and tons of great advice from similarily interested enthusiasts.

    Curtis C hit it on the head, the Hasselhof link was posted after an awe inspiring Roast on the Comedy Channel of the Legendary, One and Only? Did anyone else see that? I liked how, after the first 8 minutes, the comics realized they ran out of Hoff content, so they just started burning each other. Standard roast fare, but usually they atleast wait 'til the first commercial break.

    Sorry that we missed emails, it's something that we're not proud of, but it's really tough for us to manage consistently.

    The Mavic XM819 is really a specialty rim. Plenty of other options out there that are cheap, easier to work with, stronger, etc. etc. Melting Feather's point about the 819 is meant for UST tires IS the biggest selling point of the 819. You buy a really nice set of UST tires purposed for your local terrain, and the UST tires/rim sidewall locks together so you can run low air pressure with confidence. If you're not familiar with UST rims/tires, getting the hang of inflating your tire and locking it into the sidewall the first few times is a bit of a challenge, but once you figure it out it's not too bad. It's not a process the casual rider will enjoy though.

    So, the 819 is a really exceptional rim, IF you use it for it's intended purpose. Else, the 719 is every bit as competent, but will easily work with a wider range of tires. As soon as you deviate from the 819 though, there's a whole world of rim options, virtually any of which can be converted to run tubeless, (some are easier than others), so you'll want to find the best width rim, weight, price, finish that makes sense for you.

    Now that the Hoff is out of the bag, we'll take it down.
    Chris,

    Thanks for clearing it all up.... MTBR is indeed a great resource. I'm going to reconsider the 819's as my first choice. Although I'm sure they would be adequate, I'm not sure I would want to be limited to UST-only tires.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  17. #17
    Feral Roadie
    Reputation: bbense's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    729
    Quote Originally Posted by Porschefan View Post

    I am curious about the Flows, or a wider rim. The tires that came with the bike are Fat Alberts 2.25" (57-559) front and rear specific. They also seem fine to me. I don't know whether I would benefit from using a wider tire in the front.
    My guess is you will benefit a lot from a lower psi, fatter tire in the front.... It's by far the best bang for the buck upgrade I've done on my bike so far.

    - Booker C. Bense
    Last edited by bbense; 06-28-2011 at 04:45 PM.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by bbense View Post
    My guess is you will benefit a lot from a lower psi, fatter tire in the front.... It's by far the best bang for the buck upgrade I've done on my bike so for.

    - Booker C. Bense
    Well, this thread seems to have taken a left turn. Got my answer on BWW's comments on 819's, but now I need to know more about the advantages of the wider rims. Immediate questions that come to mind are what would be the best tire sizes (front and rear) to consider?

    I've read a lot about the practice of running lower PSI, but I'm not quite clear on how that changes the feel of the ride. I'm running the original Fat Alberts (2.25"), with tubes filled with Stan's sealant. BTW, this is how I got started on looking into the wheelset upgrade in the first place. I was getting goat head puncture flats almost every time I rode and started investigating how to cure this. Seems the Fat Albert + Crossrides aren't the best combination for going tubeless via sealing up the rim and using Stan's--although some have reported no problem. For the time being, putting Stan's in the tubes seems to be working well--I've seen several goat head punctures seal up with the Stan's and haven't had a flat since I did this.

    The lowest pressures I have tried with the current setup is ~26 psi front and ~30 rear. I started out at ~38 and ~42. I can't say I've really noticed a huge difference so far, but I'm at the stage where I just don't have enough experience to notice subtle differences. I also am getting a little better at riding, so it's just going to take some time to build up experience and skills. The one thing I have noticed that I suspect MAY be tire-related so far is that these tires at these pressures seem to wash out a lot on the trails around here. There is a lot of loose sand over hardpack (ABQ New Mexico Sandia foothills) where the bike slides on downhills--although I'm getting better at just letting it do it's thing--it seems to adjust itself pretty well. Trying to go uphill in these sections is still tricky--if I lose momentum the rear tire will spin or the front will wash out. Is this the kind of thing that would be helped by running lower pressures? At my weight (210 w/o gear) I don't know how low I can go without pinch flatting. I really don't do any drops (don't know how to yet).

    Since I seem to have found an OK solution to the goat head problem, I can take some more time to learn and experiment before plunking down $600 or so for a wheel upgrade.

    I was also concerned about the durability of the Crossrides, which are really an inexpensive set of wheels. I've been told that they aren't the greatest, and that the rear hub needs pretty rigorous maintenance, but an expert wheel builder has assured me that they are very strong wheels, although pretty heavy and the hub problems have been solved with the current model. He wasn't recommending keeping them, but was reassuring me that they weren't going to fall apart or suddenly break. He actually sounded like he thought these were actually pretty darn good wheels for the money and had several sets in his workshop from "upgraders".

    So enlightenment on any of these points will help me progress, and eventually make a good choice on new wheels.
    Last edited by Porschefan; 06-28-2011 at 03:54 PM.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by CFoster View Post
    Now that the Hoff is out of the bag, we'll take it down.
    Last I heard, Hoff was very much IN the bag....
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    66
    BWW's email customer service is horrendous but their phone customer service is great. I'm very happy with my set of BWW wheels but they really need to see about spending a couple extra minutes a day actually answering emails. That's an essential part of customer service in the 21st century.

  21. #21
    Feral Roadie
    Reputation: bbense's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    729
    Quote Originally Posted by Porschefan View Post
    I've read a lot about the practice of running lower PSI, but I'm not quite clear on how that changes the feel of the ride. I'm running the original Fat Alberts (2.25"), with tubes filled with Stan's sealant.

    The lowest pressures I have tried with the current setup is ~26 psi front and ~30 rear. I started out at ~38 and ~42. I can't say I've really noticed a huge difference so far.

    So enlightenment on any of these points will help me progress, and eventually make a good choice on new wheels.
    With narrowish rims, you really can't go very low in PSI without some nasty side effects. The tires feel "wobbly" and not solidly connected.

    A fat tire (2.4 or bigger ) on a wide rim at low psi is like adding an extra inch to your suspension. The bigger outside diameter also gives you some of the effects of going to a larger wheel size. It's easier to roll over stuff and the tire just grips better.

    But the rim has to be wide enough to support the tire or it just doesn't work well. This is just my 2 cents, but if I wasn't overly concerned with weight and was looking at new wheels I'd want a rim at least 28mm wide.

    - Booker C. Bense

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    658
    I'm going to have to disagree a bit here. I have run a few different non-UST tires on my 819's with the exact same results as with true UST tires. Absolutely ZERO problems!

    I use Slime Pro system and do have a very specific process installing my tires. But, these were my first UST wheels and they have been flawless.

    This year I switched to Schwalbe's Nobby Nic Double Defense up front (2.25) and a Continental X-King Protection on the rear and they mounted up just like my previous UST tires. These tires dropped weight and have held air wonderfully so far. In fact, the NN has not lost ANY air to date, and it was installed about 2 months ago.

    To the OP, the more you reconsider your options the more you will doubt your decision. Go with the wheel builder that provides you with the best service and don't look back
    www.quinnphoto.smugmug.com
    07 S-Works Enduro SL - Sold
    08 Epic Marathon - Sold
    2012 Stumpy EVO 29er frame up build

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Porschefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    424
    Quote Originally Posted by bbense View Post
    With narrowish rims, you really can't go very low in PSI without some nasty side effects. The tires feel "wobbly" and not solidly connected.

    A fat tire (2.4 or bigger ) on a wide rim at low psi is like adding an extra inch to your suspension. The bigger outside diameter also gives you some of the effects of going to a larger wheel size. It's easier to roll over stuff and the tire just grips better.

    But the rim has to be wide enough to support the tire or it just doesn't work well. This is just my 2 cents, but if I wasn't overly concerned with weight and was looking at new wheels I'd want a rim at least 28mm wide.

    - Booker C. Bense
    I'm actually not sure how wide a tire will even fit on the ASR-5. Yeti's website says 2.35 is the widest tire recommended. At that width, I've been told, the width of the 819's wouldn't be a problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by bquinn View Post
    I'm going to have to disagree a bit here. I have run a few different non-UST tires on my 819's with the exact same results as with true UST tires. Absolutely ZERO problems!

    I use Slime Pro system and do have a very specific process installing my tires. But, these were my first UST wheels and they have been flawless.

    This year I switched to Schwalbe's Nobby Nic Double Defense up front (2.25) and a Continental X-King Protection on the rear and they mounted up just like my previous UST tires. These tires dropped weight and have held air wonderfully so far. In fact, the NN has not lost ANY air to date, and it was installed about 2 months ago.

    To the OP, the more you reconsider your options the more you will doubt your decision. Go with the wheel builder that provides you with the best service and don't look back
    Thanks for the added info. It's good to hear that it's unlikely that tire selection is going to be a problem.

    I'm taking a gradual approach to this upgrade, so the more I learn, the better. I'm now thinking that I'll get the new wheels in the off-season. The Crossrides, cheap as they may be, seem to be holding up fine (knock on wood) and I'm certainly not riding at a level where I'm stressing them out.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash. ~Julie Furtado

Similar Threads

  1. Bicycle Wheel Warehouse
    By dexetr30 in forum Where are the Best Deals?
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 04-23-2011, 08:54 PM
  2. Bicycle Wheel Warehouse
    By Mr. Mohaupt in forum Where are the Best Deals?
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-03-2010, 09:04 PM
  3. Bicycle Wheel Warehouse
    By Shamrock1079 in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-17-2009, 09:01 PM
  4. Bicycle Wheel Warehouse
    By jamesjoker in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-27-2007, 12:31 PM
  5. Anyone ever buy from Bicycle Wheel Warehouse?
    By matamua in forum Where are the Best Deals?
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 12-13-2007, 11:20 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •