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  1. #1
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    Hadley Rear Axle Torque Specs

    I have a 10mm Hadley bolt on rear axle and wondering if anybody has any idea what the torque specs are for it? I can't find any Hadley manuals online and have searched through mtbr forums. I also sent an email to I9 (I run the Enduros) and no reply. thanks.
    fill what's empty, empty what's full, and scratch where it itches.

  2. #2
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    I was wondering that myself. I called Hadley twice and a very nice lady said she'd ask and call me back but unfortunately I never received a call with the info. I found torque calculators online but they don't work with aluminum bolts.
    There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

  3. #3
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    check out Go-Rides website. they don't give torque specs., but you'll get the idea.
    breezy shade

  4. #4
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    They have an article on rebuilding the hub and mention this about the axle caps :

    7 install axle cap. Fully tighten. Don�t go crazy but it should be really snug.
    They say nothing, at least that I found, about torquing the through axle. Still looking for an answer.
    There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

  5. #5
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    relate what they say about the axle caps to tightening the through axle & you'll be fine, the same as you would tighten your front if you've got a through axle. you're probably not going to find any exact torque spec., since Hadley doesn't even have a website. i've been on one of their hubs for about 3 yrs. & my best "guess" on what torque i put on mine is
    20-30 PSI. good luck.
    breezy shade

  6. #6
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    I called Hadley as well, and the woman said she would email me the torque spec. Never heard from I9 either on what they would recommend. I will let you all know if I hear back from Hadley or I9. Man, you wouldn't think this would be such a hard question to answer.
    fill what's empty, empty what's full, and scratch where it itches.

  7. #7
    mda
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    I emailed Hadley about a week ago requesting max torque figures for both their 10mm and 12mm through bolts. Zero response.

  8. #8
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    Yea, I never heard back from Hadley. But, I9 did respond that I needed to adjust the bearing pre-load on the wheels. (my rear wheel was not spinning well). So, I adjusted the pre-load and now the wheel spins well. I then torqued the hadley pretty tight and I think I am in good shpae. If I ever find any torque specs, I will post them.
    fill what's empty, empty what's full, and scratch where it itches.

  9. #9
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    I9 has some really good customer service. They came back to me and recommended 25 to 30 ft lbs. of torque.

    "The torque specs would typically be spec'ed by the through-bolt manufacturer (Hadley in this case). However, given the strength of the through bolt set up, it is not going to be very torque sensitive. It is safe to say that very firm torque would be in order (25-30 ft lbs)."

    I hope that helps!
    fill what's empty, empty what's full, and scratch where it itches.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Serotta b1kr
    I9 has some really good customer service. They came back to me and recommended 25 to 30 ft lbs. of torque.

    "The torque specs would typically be spec'ed by the through-bolt manufacturer (Hadley in this case). However, given the strength of the through bolt set up, it is not going to be very torque sensitive. It is safe to say that very firm torque would be in order (25-30 ft lbs)."

    I hope that helps!
    I think 25 ft-lb (300 in-lb) is for steel bolt-on axles/nuts. That is what Chris King and Shimano Saint (minimum) recommends for their bolt-on setups. 300 in-lb is a lot of torque, almost as much as for the cassette lock-ring.

    Commencal and Yeti says in their manual to use roughly 100 in-lb. I assume that these companies use aluminum axles with their bikes. Since Hadley (and Intense) axles are made out of aluminum, I would think 100 in-lb is the right number. You don't want to over-torque and screw up the threads, especially since they are relatively soft vs. bolt-on threads.

    The last thing is that you might want to think about replacing the nut (if regular) with nylon-lock nut. Axles tend to get loose easily, and the lock-nuts will help prevent that.

  11. #11
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    just got a hadley bolt up. anybody ever hear anything official?
    Last edited by dulyebr; 07-09-2009 at 07:40 PM.

  12. #12
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    21 newton-meters is what Hadley emailed to me a week ago. So there we go, and official torque spec. 1 newton meter = 0.737562149 foot pounds so the torque in ft/lbs is - 15.5
    There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

  13. #13
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    ...186 inch pounds - nice

    Thanks kingair!

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    Was lubing my chain and realized that the back pedal was very draggy. The chain was practically falling off the rings. I decided to see if the axle torque was the cause; sure enough it was. So even though i9 claims you can use a ton of torque, and the Hadley bolt can take it, it results in a draggy rear hub. And, my guess is that the bearings would wear out super quick.

    Now I don't know how much torque to use. I remember reading that a bolt-on skewer was meant to take 60 inch pounds. I guess I'll use that for now. God! I miss my Fun-Bolts..

    Hey i9, how about you give your customers the information they need to use your product?

    Here is all I got from i9:

    "The Hadley bolt is really nice, a great way to go! I don’t have a torque spec for that, just make certain that it’s nice and snug, not overly tight…"

    Any ideas on what that means in inch pounds?
    Last edited by dulyebr; 08-09-2009 at 11:21 AM.

  15. #15
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    I use the recommended hadley torque spec with no problem. Sounds like you have other issues going on to me. Really can't get more official than an email direct from hadley stating what the proper torque should be on their axle. If everything else is correct in the hub the axle torque shouldn't load your bearings imo.
    There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

  16. #16
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    Whatever torque is needed to keep the hub attached to the frame. It's easy to over tighten this thing, be careful.

    Be sure to apply anti-seize compound to the aluminum threads or else the nut will cold weld itself to the axle.

    Cheers,

    -S

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingair
    Really can't get more official than an email direct from hadley stating what the proper torque should be on their axle.
    Why would Hadley be able to tell me a spec for another manufacture's hub?

    I'm running 100 inch pounds. Feels right, nice round number, and no more drag.
    Last edited by dulyebr; 08-10-2009 at 01:11 PM.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dulyebr
    Why would Hadley be able to tell me a spec for another manufactures hub?

    I'm running 100 inch pounds. Feels right, nice round number, and no more drag.
    Because torquing the axle has to do with the size of the axle, thread pitch and the material used for the axle. Really has nothing to do with the hub at all. IMO you have another issue that needs addressed even though less torque on the axle appears/seems to have solved your problem. However if you're happy with your setup then great, it's all good!
    There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingair
    Really has nothing to do with the hub at all. IMO you have another issue that needs addressed even though less torque on the axle appears/seems to have solved your problem.

    "...not overly tight"
    ~direct quote from Industry 9 rep~

    doubt I've got other issues that need addressing; see Occum's razor.

  20. #20
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    I got one of these axles myself now and I'm just happy with it. Great quality and very light weight.
    It may not be the most "correct" thing to mount a Hadley axle into a King hub, but hey... at least technically it works like a charm

    PS: If you set your bearing preload after the wheel has been mounted to the frame, after the axle is tight, you shouldn't have any problems with drag.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radical_53
    I got one of these axles myself now and I'm just happy with it. Great quality and very light weight.
    It may not be the most "correct" thing to mount a Hadley axle into a King hub, but hey... at least technically it works like a charm

    PS: If you set your bearing preload after the wheel has been mounted to the frame, after the axle is tight, you shouldn't have any problems with drag.
    No way you can set the preload after the bolt is tight. Nothing is going to move. Apparently my preload was too tight, which is why I was getting drag, but I actually had to snug (barely) the dust cap, and then back it off a quarter turn, i.e. leave some play, in order to get it to spin freely. The wheel is tight, and it spins without drag, but it just feels strange that I had to put in the frame loose like that.

  22. #22
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    It's no problem to adjust with a King hub, so what you're explaining just sounds like what I always "loved" with the Shimano cone hubs. Then you'll definitely need a lot of patience and a good mood, wish you luck

  23. #23
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    Was out of town trying to find this info the other day. This thread was all I could find. Couldn't believe it was 21 NM. Then I remembered (when I got home) that it was written on the axle.

    Posted for truth. 10 * 135mm Hadley bolt through. 20 - 22NM. As posted above.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hadley Rear Axle Torque Specs-hadley-hub-axle-1024x802-.jpg  


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