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  1. #1
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    Going tubeless for occasional rider

    Hey guys. I ride a 2-3 times a month. I’ve read that sealants like Stans etel need to be “refreshed” anywhere from every couple of weeks to a month?

    Is his the case for the most part (I’m guessing there are some variables like tires and weather)?

    Just trying to decide if it is “worth” the extra effort or not.

    Thanks
    J-

  2. #2
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    Check/refresh sealant every 4-6 mo. Weepy leaky tires need it more frequently.
    Do the math.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Check/refresh sealant every 4-6 mo.

    That's about my experience too, never had weepy tires though.

    Since I ride pretty often tubeless is much less effort than using tubes because I don't have to waste time fixing flats anymore. If you don't get any flats then I can't say whether or not it would be worth it, it's pretty easy though if you have the right rims and tires.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  4. #4
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    Cool thanks guys. Def seems more worth it with that time frame. I’ll give it a whirl and see how it works with my current tires (maxxis ardent and igniter).

    J-

  5. #5
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    Use the new "Finish Line" stuff.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Use the new "Finish Line" stuff.
    Pretty good stuff? I’ll have to check it out.

    J-

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjc155 View Post
    Pretty good stuff? I’ll have to check it out.

    J-
    Seems like the jury is still out, it got a poor review on this site but I haven't seen any others yet. I've had really good luck with orange seal over the last few years.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  8. #8
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    For fall, winter, and spring my sealant doesn't dry out. For summer, I seem to be replacing it twice. Its hot as balls here in summer.

    Even paying full retail for small bottles (most expensive way to go), my sealant cost for the entire summer is about what a cheap lunch runs. I like orange seal. Even though it does dry out, its not much of an issue.

    I think its worth it either way, especially if you live somewhere with thorns/goatheads all over the place.

  9. #9
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    cool thanks again for all the info guys. I last quick question.

    When the sealant dries out in the tire does that allow the air to go out or does it just not stop any new leaks? Like if I don't refresh it when it needs to be will it be an issue for a normal ride? or only if I take a thorn etc.

    Thanks
    J-

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjc155 View Post
    cool thanks again for all the info guys. I last quick question.

    When the sealant dries out in the tire does that allow the air to go out or does it just not stop any new leaks? Like if I don't refresh it when it needs to be will it be an issue for a normal ride? or only if I take a thorn etc.

    Thanks
    J-

    It probably depends a lot on the tires, I've been using bontrager TR tires and they hold air pretty good without any sealant at all. I tend to procrastinate and often let my sealant run dry, the tires still hold air fine but puncture resistance is obviously compromised.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjc155 View Post
    cool thanks again for all the info guys. I last quick question.

    When the sealant dries out in the tire does that allow the air to go out or does it just not stop any new leaks? Like if I don't refresh it when it needs to be will it be an issue for a normal ride? or only if I take a thorn etc.

    Thanks
    J-
    In my experience running tubeless for 10 years now, tires tend to slow leak when sealant has dried out, so you'll notice a ~5-10 PSI drop over night. The tires will usually hold pressure fine during a 1-2 hour ride if you forget/don't have any sealant to top up; it might even be fine if you get a thorn since it's usually not all dried out, but you won't seal anything larger than that.

    It also depends on the tires. I have a set of Conti MKs that weep constantly and needs sealant monthly, but they hold air during rides and just will not wear out. Back when people still ran UST rims and tires, you could run totally dried out sealant for months and not even know since the whole system was design to not need sealant. Some of the thicker casing tires now a days are like that too.

  12. #12
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    ^^^. That's my experience too. Tires leak down faster when dried out, but if you wait to that point, you've likely been riding awhile without enough sealant to be effective should you have had a puncture. Of course that's only bad if you actually punctured.
    Do the math.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by hkenshin View Post
    In my experience running tubeless for 10 years now, tires tend to slow leak when sealant has dried out, so you'll notice a ~5-10 PSI drop over night.
    I haven't had that experience, I don't know if it's due to the tires or sealant I've been using, or both. Orange Seal coats the tire and forms sort of a skin like a thin tube and even when totally dry the tires hold air just fine.The only way I know they're dry is to check them or when I get a puncture that won't seal.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  14. #14
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    Cool thanks again for the info guys.

    J-

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjc155 View Post
    Pretty good stuff? I’ll have to check it out.

    J-
    Not quite sure...just ordered a liter. But it will last longer than the other designs.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Check/refresh sealant every 4-6 mo. Weepy leaky tires need it more frequently.
    Every 2 months in summer for me. Bikes are stored in a hot garage.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    Every 2 months in summer for me. Bikes are stored in a hot garage.
    Ok may be the same for me since mine lives in the back of my truck under the cap. 2 months is def doable for me.
    Thanks.
    J-

  18. #18
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    I like riding tubeless, but once my wife had a flat with a factory tubeless setup and I could not get the bead to seal with my Lezyne pump. Luckily I had a tube with me. I know all kinds of riders now advocate for tubeless, but how are people coping with a flat if they are miles from a compressor? I would respectfully like to rule out any responses that involve CO2, thanks. I have mounted perhaps two dozen tubeless tires on wheels. Never without a compressor.

  19. #19
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    I plan on carrying a tube since I already do anyways. I use co2 for field repairs/tube replacement.

    J-

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyro_t View Post
    I know all kinds of riders now advocate for tubeless, but how are people coping with a flat if they are miles from a compressor? I would respectfully like to rule out any responses that involve CO2, thanks.

    I've never had a bead unseat and punctures or cuts that won't seal have been super rare but I always carry a tube just in case. I've had to use 1 or 2 of them in the last 3 years but probably wouldn't have had to if I carried a plug kit, which I plan on getting.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I've never had a bead unseat and punctures or cuts that won't seal have been super rare but I always carry a tube just in case. I've had to use 1 or 2 of them in the last 3 years but probably wouldn't have had to if I carried a plug kit, which I plan on getting.
    Yea I need to commit to a plug kit when I go tubeless. Figure it would save a few oz and space out of my pack.

    J-

  22. #22
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    I am open minded on this, however if you are in the back country and you have a spare tube, CO2, a plug kit, maybe a little sealant then is the superior ride quality that much better than a nice thin tube? I am a subdued trail rider and probably won't get a pinch flat, or run over cholla spines for that matter so I have decided it just may not be worth the risk of a flat with tubeless tires. I would like to be persuaded otherwise.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyro_t View Post
    I am open minded on this, however if you are in the back country and you have a spare tube, CO2, a plug kit, maybe a little sealant then is the superior ride quality that much better than a nice thin tube? I am a subdued trail rider and probably won't get a pinch flat, or run over cholla spines for that matter so I have decided it just may not be worth the risk of a flat with tubeless tires. I would like to be persuaded otherwise.
    As with tubed tires you only need to carry a spare tube and a mini-pump. With tubed tires you carry 3 tubes (2 in the tires) and with tubeless just 1. Co2. plug kits, etc. are all optional.

    It isn't complicated or difficult, and there's much less risk of getting a flat with tubeless that with tubes.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  24. #24
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    Can anyone recommend a plug kit that's not going to cost an arm and a leg?

  25. #25
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    I just have one more questions then. Have you (or anyone else on this thread) ever seated a tubeless tire in the field with a mini pump?


    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    As with tubed tires you only need to carry a spare tube and a mini-pump. With tubed tires you carry 3 tubes (2 in the tires) and with tubeless just 1. Co2. plug kits, etc. are all optional.

    It isn't complicated or difficult, and there's much less risk of getting a flat with tubeless that with tubes.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyro_t View Post
    I just have one more questions then. Have you (or anyone else on this thread) ever seated a tubeless tire in the field with a mini pump?
    Probably impossible with most mini-pumps, for sure it would be with mine. I would never even try to do it.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyro_t View Post
    I just have one more questions then. Have you (or anyone else on this thread) ever seated a tubeless tire in the field with a mini pump?
    Maybe not. But why would you need to. If you use a plug, you don't need to pull the bead, and if you stick a tube in seating will occur when you pump up the tube.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Maybe not. But why would you need to. If you use a plug, you don't need to pull the bead, and if you stick a tube in seating will occur when you pump up the tube.
    Exactly, it's a non-issue.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  29. #29
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    Okay then better take along two tubes just in case you have that issue on the other wheel, a plug kit, some extra sealant and you're good to go

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyro_t View Post
    Okay then better take along two tubes just in case you have that issue on the other wheel, a plug kit, some extra sealant and you're good to go
    Valve core removal tool, if you are adding sealant through the valve, which btw its super easy, and no mess.

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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyro_t View Post
    Okay then better take along two tubes just in case you have that issue on the other wheel, a plug kit, some extra sealant and you're good to go


    Some people who use tubes carry 2 or 3 spares, a patch kit, a tire boot kit, and a needle and cord to sew sidewall cuts. It all depends how paranoid you are or how well prepared you like to be. I carry a tube and a tiny pump and never use them.

    You seem to be insinuating that tubeless requires more baggage and hassles but it's the exact opposite IME.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeDee View Post
    Can anyone recommend a plug kit that's not going to cost an arm and a leg?
    Genuine innovations plug kit is about $7 and works great!


    I heard that someone used the air in his good tire to seat a repaired tubeless tire (using some kind of tube running from valve to valve), then just pumped to good tire back up. Sound like a good idea in theory.

    I also think if you don't have issues with thorns and constant flats and the bike is rarely used, I would just stick with tubes. Seems like you would be constantly dealing with a pool of dry sealant at the bottom of your flat tire every time you wanted to ride.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Some people who use tubes carry 2 or 3 spares, a patch kit, a tire boot kit, and a needle and cord to sew sidewall cuts. It all depends how paranoid you are or how well prepared you like to be. I carry a tube and a tiny pump and never use them.

    You seem to be insinuating that tubeless requires more baggage and hassles but it's the exact opposite IME.
    Agree .... some carry a lot of things as the Just in Case and I've seen a lot of happy campers that have been tubeless for years.

    I'm still tubed with a spare, scabs and a pump as my JIC but my experiences or downtime with flats or even adding air is next to nil. If otherwise, I'd be more tempted, justified or interested in trying tubeless and the once or twice a year sealant redo.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  34. #34
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    I don't carry anything except a lever. If my tire goes flat, which has only happened once with Schwalbe Liteskin shit tires, I stuff it with grass and ride it gingerly home.

  35. #35
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    I've gotten too bold. I don't carry anything. Tubeless has been good to me.

    I should toss in a plug kit. I can't imagine going back to the hassle of tubes.

  36. #36
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    Well pulled the tubes and went tubeless today. Went with Orange Seal Endurance. Seemed to seal up decent, couple of weepy spots but the wheels are on buckets right now so hopefully that seals those spots. Rims are Stans Flow ZTR's so the rims shouldn't be an issue.

    J-

  37. #37
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    Update.

    Checked the tires this morning and they held air good over night and seemed to seal up good EXCEPT when i lowered the pressure ( I aired them to 40psi over hight) down to 25psi one of them started to bubble at the bead (only about 1/8inch length). I assume that the sealant will seal it right up( i have it back on the bucket with that side down) but is this typical?

    Tire is a Maxxis Ardent 29x2.4 which is about 4 years old.

    Thanks
    J-

  38. #38
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    The sealant can easily last several months depending on the amount added and the conditions you ride in, but if you don't ride at least once a week it may not be worth the learning curve of getting sealant in the tire and getting the tire inflated and adding tape to the rim if you have a tubeless-ready rim.

  39. #39
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    This is a good project.
    If "the occasional rider" has little drama or work over the long term once the procedure is done, that's a solid testmony to a trouble free set-up.

    Especially for those that have had PITA conundrums with tubes.
    I'll stay tuned !


    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    This is a good project.
    If "the occasional rider" has little drama or work over the long term once the procedure is done, that's a solid testmony to a trouble free set-up.

    Especially for those that have had PITA conundrums with tubes.
    I'll stay tuned !


    Yep if the sealant lasts a while I’m good with it.

    Literally took me 15 minutes to removed the tube, tape the rim, install the stem, pop the bead in place and inject the sealant. I have a compressor so i had no issues with popping the bead in place and it takes me 5 seconds to inflate a tire.

    Even if I have to refresh it a couple times a summer that may be worth it to me in the long run.

    J-

  41. #41
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    Ive used tires that wont hold air for more than 30 minutes or so dry, but hold for weeks with sealant. If you're holding 40psi overnight on a dry tire, you're rock solid!

  42. #42
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    update: checked the tires after sitting at the lower pressure all day and they are sealed up good and tight.

    thanks

    J-

  43. #43
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    Have you considered bringing a 2-3 ounce bottle of sealant with you? I recently stopped carrying a tube in my hydration pack, and swapped it out for a cheap plug kit and 3 ounce bottle of sealant. Then it doesnt matter if the sealant has dried out in one of my bikes, since I can just add more and pump the tire back up.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitsBoy View Post
    Have you considered bringing a 2-3 ounce bottle of sealant with you? I recently stopped carrying a tube in my hydration pack, and swapped it out for a cheap plug kit and 3 ounce bottle of sealant. Then it doesnt matter if the sealant has dried out in one of my bikes, since I can just add more and pump the tire back up.
    Thats a good idea! never ever thought of this.

    Thanks

    J-

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