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  1. #1
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    flat spot= dead rim?

    I just bought a used bike and the wheelset has me a little concerned. Running tubes at 45 psi I've never had rim damage before besides going out of true and spokes breaking. The wheelset has a couple noticable flat spots where I can feel a slight bulge in the sidewall of the rim. The rims are also out of true. I'm debating just getting trued and seeing how much use I can get out of them unless you think that's a bad idea due to poor wheel integeity. The spokes and hubs are top of the line but I'm no wheel builder so I'd have to look at a whole new wheelset and am getting a little short on clams after the bike buy. Thoughts kn this issue?
    Keep the rubber side down

  2. #2
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    I've pounded out flat spots on rims to make them (semi) rideable but really there is no fix. You say your hubs are top of the line? Rebuild!

  3. #3
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    Take a Crescent wrench and put a cone wrench between the Crescent and rim and gently bend back. Re-true.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    Take a Crescent wrench and put a cone wrench between the Crescent and rim and gently bend back. Re-true.
    Not sure about the adjustable and cone wrench combo but "gently"? It takes a healthy impact to dent a rim and it will take an equally healthy force to persuade it back again.

    I think the main point is that any fix will usually be a band-aid to get you rolling until you can pony up for a permanent fix.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys. It is a tubeless set up and the previous rider was clearly riding big chunk with the pressure too low and was handing big blows to the rim. The stans is holding a seal. Any reason not to just re-true and ignore the small dents for now? Is there less ingetrity with the seal holding when you have side-wall trauma? My major concern is safety, not too worried about the cosmetics ATM. I will likely run closer to 35PSI to prevent further rim hits...
    Keep the rubber side down

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Not sure about the adjustable and cone wrench combo but "gently"? It takes a healthy impact to dent a rim and it will take an equally healthy force to persuade it back again.

    I think the main point is that any fix will usually be a band-aid to get you rolling until you can pony up for a permanent fix.
    I guess it depends on your rim and your wrench. I have straightened quite a few rims and my method works fine and I am still riding the wheels. Gently refers to taking your time and only bending enough to straighten the rim as AL does not like being being bent past point where the repair does not return to original position. If you can not bend a rim wall with a 12" crescent wrench I have no comment ....

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    I guess it depends on your rim and your wrench. I have straightened quite a few rims and my method works fine and I am still riding the wheels. Gently refers to taking your time and only bending enough to straighten the rim as AL does not like being being bent past point where the repair does not return to original position. If you can not bend a rim wall with a 12" crescent wrench I have no comment ....
    I understand what you are saying now. You are referring to the dimples on the sides of the rim that the impact produces and yes, I agree you have to be gentle with those.

    I was talking about the the flat spot, kind of like this-



    and for that you have to be a bit brutal. they make a tool to pull it out but I've had better luck removing about 4 spokes in the affected area and whacking it with a rubber mallet, more fun too!

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