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  1. #1
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    Exhausted with tubeless goop.

    Going to try my first tubeless set-up. Tired of worthless slime tubes. Lots of homework has left me still wondering which goop to use. Looks like the 24" split tube method will be most reliable for my 650b Neo-moto's and whineman's.

    I would just go with Stans, but I don't think removing big boogers every three to six months sounds very professional (as a product). I looked at the sites. Orange seal, very little info other than ours is the best. Flat-attack, truckerco, Victor heavy duty sealant, Slime pro. Homebrew leaves me with thoughts of a chemestry lab test gone bad (JOKE).

    If Stans didn't dry up it would be a no brainer, but jeepers, I need a aspirin.

    Testimonials, reviews. That would help!

  2. #2
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    I've been using Stan's for a year or so. All the guys I ride with who ride tubeless ride Stan's. We put more fluid in after 6 months or so, but never have to take the tires off to clean them out or anything. We wear out tires before they'd get too bad anyway. Total disclosure: I haven't used any other tubeless brews, but Stan's is easy enough and reliable enough that I haven't been motivated to go searching.
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  3. #3
    dwt
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    As I undertand it, auto tire sealants are primarily designed to plug puntures (various particles suspened in antifreeze solution) while latex based tubeless bicycle tire sealants asre designed to seal beads and to make non UST tire casings airtight. Your NeoMotos are not a UST or a TLR tire - they are designed to be run with tubes and not tuebless. To get them to run tubless you wil need a latex base sealant. Stans has been around the longest and is tried and true. If you check the no tubes website, the MSDS for the sealantt found here lists 3 ingresientrs: liquid latex, propylene glycol, and water. Not that there might not be other ingredients. But it is easy to find inexpnsive liquid latex and propylene glycol used in non toxic antifreezee online. Mix them 1 part latex, 2 parts antifreeze plus water as needed to thin. Trust me this homebrew works fine. FYI I hve 4 neomotos, three 2.1's and one 2.3 all mounted and running tubeless. The easy part is mixing the selant. Getting non tubeless tires to seat can make your head ache. There are various methods, all requiring latex sealant: Stans rim strip, ghetto split tube, gorilla duct tape. You have to plug the spoke holes in the rim with tape such as Stans yellow tape, and support the tire bead so it won't burp or blow off the rim which is normally the job of the tube of tube. I use gorilla tape alone, no rim strip or ghetto tube which has worked fine for months on 2 650b bikes. but not a normally accepted or reccommended method, but the least expensive as well as least labor intensive.


    check you tube and other threads in this forum.. There are a a lot of ways to run tubleless. the questions and the variations are 1) how expensive; 2) how heavy 3) how difficult and 4) how reliable (safe)? The notubes wesbite has a list of non tubeless tires compatible with notubes rimstrips. A lot of folks on the 650b forum run Pacentis as well as Nevagals tubeless wiith sealant and gorilla tape only (me for example).
    Last edited by dwt; 03-26-2012 at 02:46 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimbowho View Post

    I would just go with Stans, but I don't think removing big boogers every three to six months sounds very professional (as a product).
    Well, split tube is pretty unprofessional too. But stans works. If you haven't even tried it yet the sealant will be the least of your worries. Getting the tires to stay locked on to the rims with a strip of rubber stuck between the bead and the rim is job one.

  5. #5
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    NB: Slime Pro doesn't dry out or booger up like Stan's

    Also, get a real UST setup, or at least a rim with a bead lock.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    NB: Slime Pro doesn't dry out or booger up like Stan's

    Also, get a real UST setup, or at least a rim with a bead lock.
    Slime Pro dried out in four of the six tires I have used it in.
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  7. #7
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    The homebrew sealant I use is:

    1 part green slime
    1 part Latex Mold Builder (+/-)
    1 part Anti-freeze
    2 parts water (+/-) to "taste"

    and works fine for me in a majority of setups (split tube and gorilla tape)
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Slime Pro dried out in four of the six tires I have used it in.
    Dried out over the course of what time frame?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by djr8505 View Post
    The homebrew sealant I use is:

    1 part green slime
    1 part Latex Mold Builder (+/-)
    1 part Anti-freeze
    2 parts water (+/-) to "taste"

    and works fine for me in a majority of setups (split tube and gorilla tape)
    Similar for me, with some mods
    1 part Slime for Tubeless Tires (found cheaper at Autoparts Store, with small black chunks in it)
    1 part Mold Builder
    2 parts RV Antifreeze (non-toxic, already diluted, cheap)
    +/- glitter for chunks

    Been using the current formula for a couple years after tweaking it over the course of a year or two. But it does still get the boogers after about 6 months.

  10. #10
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    Real good people. Everyone stayed on topic which gave me some hands on insight. DWT I'm going to go with strips, and stans thank you, your experience with what I am running is a big help. LightJunction makes a point I wanted to hear. 92gli, the vid of a 24" tube seemed easy, but your point makes sense, I will hold off on that for now. No more slime for me either Shiggy! And I'm not ready to go full proper set up until I hurt what I have. I'm old school but couldn't hold out any longer with slime flats. Thanks

    Update!! Cancel.

  11. #11
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    Well for all you noobs at tubeless, it's fairly simple. But I did do some one off stuff that worked flawlessly. First, I opted out of Stan's stems due to them only coming in presta. (I have shrader). So I stole the shrader valves from my offroad used tube stash. With a grinder and wire wheel, I had two perfect threaded shraders with zero rubber on them and ground down perfectly to fit a o-ring. Sano, snug, hope it works long term. No strips either, I used 10-mil plumbers tape, basically a heavy duty electrical tape and very tacky. Stans was good advice, I was a bit surprised how fast they popped into place and sealed right up. I'm a plumber so this stuff was all on hand.

    Suggestion for us noobs! Do a dry run first with soapy squirt bottle to make sure it holds air, then pour in the juice. I found putting the wheels back on a upside down bike a handy tool. PS air compresor.

  12. #12
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    I didn't refresh my former front tire since, maybe, mid-summer. I replaced the tire a few days ago & it still had liquid in it. All the inside was coated with Stan's 'moss' (that's what it reminded me of). I live in TX so last summer was SUPER HOT. It may have been more like late summer since putting in some extra Stan's but it was still awhile & it lasted longer than I thought it would. I run ghetto tubeless & the bead was stuck to the split tube but wasn't difficult to remove.

    Before putting in Stan's, I check for leaks & let it sit for a bit. So far, no leaks of any kind. I've used Geax TNT Dhea, Maxxis EXO Ardent, & Schwalbe Hans Dampf.

  13. #13
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  14. #14
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    FWIW there will be a new sealant released this summer by a major player that addresses these "issues" and still seals the bead on tightly. Completely different formula than the popular brand. I'm sworn to secrecy so that's all I can say but they did give me some for testing today so I'll know real soon if they have elevated the game. Their lab testing has shown that it seals tires that are difficult to seal with the other brand for initial mounting so that's another big plus. Tire technology is also changing as a result of better sealants but I can't reveal how just yet. Let's just say tubes are going the way of V-brakes soon - a lot sooner than peeps might think.

    Have FUN!

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  15. #15
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    There is also Orange Seal Cyclery made in TX. My lbs told me they're started using it & like it more than Stan's b/c it is less watery so doesn't dry out as fast.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    FWIW there will be a new sealant released this summer by a major player that addresses these "issues" and still seals the bead on tightly. Completely different formula than the popular brand. I'm sworn to secrecy so that's all I can say but they did give me some for testing today so I'll know real soon if they have elevated the game. Their lab testing has shown that it seals tires that are difficult to seal with the other brand for initial mounting so that's another big plus. Tire technology is also changing as a result of better sealants but I can't reveal how just yet. Let's just say tubes are going the way of V-brakes soon - a lot sooner than peeps might think.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Awesome news, THANKS!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Slime Pro dried out in four of the six tires I have used it in.
    I don't believe you, this time.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  18. #18
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    I use the home brew sealant recipe listed in this thread. I have still had a nice booger form before, and I still get sealant drying out. Although it is more on an annual basis instead of every couple of months. I think it is not so much drying out as seeping through the sidewalls. I notice that my tires all eventually have very weepy sidewalls when I use the homebrew. Not that I'm losing air pressure, but some part of the sealant is weeping out. I think it is the anti freeze.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewarnerusa View Post
    I use the home brew sealant recipe listed in this thread. I have still had a nice booger form before, and I still get sealant drying out. Although it is more on an annual basis instead of every couple of months. I think it is not so much drying out as seeping through the sidewalls. I notice that my tires all eventually have very weepy sidewalls when I use the homebrew. Not that I'm losing air pressure, but some part of the sealant is weeping out. I think it is the anti freeze.
    Thats what is happening with my homebrew sealant. Green ooze coming out of the tires if the bike sits for too long.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTscoob View Post
    Thats what is happening with my homebrew sealant. Green ooze coming out of the tires if the bike sits for too long.
    Yup, that's what mine all end up looking like. I pretty much always use Specialized 2Bliss tires and when they are new there will be no seepage. But after a while it starts. I think I scuff the sidewalls a lot and that lets the seeping start. As long as I'm not losing air pressure then it doesn't really concern me. But it is a bit filthy looking and it collects trail dust. I smell like an auto mechanic after handling my tires.

  21. #21
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    I'm having lunch with the guys making the new sealant on Monday so I'll find out when it will be publicly released and just what info I can say here. I've been using it for only a month but so far I find that it holds air better than Stan's does when used with standard tires (non-UST) so that has been a big plus. They swear that it doesn't dry out like Stan's either - easily last a year or more. The company behind this... let's just say they're a MAJOR player in the bicycle industry and they have every intention of dominating that market with something better.

    Have FUN!

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  22. #22
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    I'm having lunch with the guys making the new sealant on Monday so I'll find out when it will be publicly released and just what info I can say here. I've been using it for only a month but so far I find that it holds air better than Stan's does when used with standard tires (non-UST) so that has been a big plus. They swear that it doesn't dry out like Stan's either - easily last a year or more. The company behind this... let's just say they're a MAJOR player in the bicycle industry and they have every intention of dominating that market with something better.
    Stans consists of liquid latex, propylene glycol and water. All tubeless mtn bike sealants are latex based except Cafelatex, which uses an artificial latex concoction. The reviews in this forum of Cafelatex are not exactly glowing as far as sealing punctures. The main use for latex sealants is to seal beads and casings on non UST tires so they can be run tubeless. If you can't achieve an air tight seal, you don't have a tubeless tire. Sealing punctures is related, but really another subject.

    Many MTBR tubeless riders have concocted their own latex based "homebrews", costing a fraction of any commercial sealant and working as well or better. What comes with the territory of latex and water is coagulation and evaporation. That means boogers and eventual drying is inevitable and cannot be avoided by your MAJOR player.

    I can think of only two bike companies which qualify as "MAJOR" and which would have the chutzpah to take on Stans and try to market a so called super sealant: Specialized and Shimano.

    I will argue in advance that whatever they come up with has been done before, and it will be a variation of the S.O.S. Period. It will NOT be better or even different. Anybody who falls for it is a victim of marketing and nothing more.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    What comes with the territory of latex and water is coagulation and evaporation. That means boogers and eventual drying is inevitable and cannot be avoided by your MAJOR player.
    Slime pro does not booger up like Stan's does. The Slime Pro people at Sea Otter also told me that you can use CO2 with their sealant.

    [Latex in solution begins to coagulate when the pH starts to go down, i.e. becomes more acidic. This can either happen because the ammonia that buffers the latex somehow "goes away", or by the addition of CO2, which goes into solution as carbonic acid]

    What this tells me is that S.P. must have some kind of a better buffer solution than Stan's.

    Also, S.P. does become more viscous with time. I recently reconstituted mine with water, and it seemed to still seal up sidewall leaks just fine.

  24. #24
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    The best results I've has are with stans....I've not personally tried everything, but in my riding group we have. The balls of latex you must expect, most of them come from small punctures that you never even knew existed until you removed the tyre. The massive balls I've really only ever come across when I did DIY sealant (as mentioned above). Those ones tend to break back down into their constituent parts....ie the radiator fluid will weep out of the tyre pores.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    ...I can think of only two bike companies which qualify as "MAJOR" and which would have the chutzpah to take on Stans and try to market a so called super sealant: Specialized and Shimano...
    What about Conti? Has anyone got hold of the new Conti sealant?

    What about the OKO sealants - they've been doing non bike tubeless stuff for decades and now have two different types of bike sealant - an XC type and a "extreme" type. Has anyone tried their stuff?

  26. #26
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    What this tells me is that S.P. must have some kind of a better buffer solution than Stan's.
    Don't tell me that sealant is now a religion like wheel size

    I think "better" is in the eyes of the beholder. Price OTOH is objective. SP is more expensive than Stans. Whether its better and worth it is up to you.

    I don't care if some new "super sealant" claims it's "better" than SP or Stans. If it's expensive it's a rip off. I can brew pretty much the same solution in my basement (and have for years) for a miniscule cost, and infallible reliability.

    It's your money, but there are many paths, not one.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Stans consists of liquid latex, propylene glycol and water. All tubeless mtn bike sealants are latex based except Cafelatex, which uses an artificial latex concoction. The reviews in this forum of Cafelatex are not exactly glowing as far as sealing punctures. The main use for latex sealants is to seal beads and casings on non UST tires so they can be run tubeless. If you can't achieve an air tight seal, you don't have a tubeless tire. Sealing punctures is related, but really another subject.

    Many MTBR tubeless riders have concocted their own latex based "homebrews", costing a fraction of any commercial sealant and working as well or better. What comes with the territory of latex and water is coagulation and evaporation. That means boogers and eventual drying is inevitable and cannot be avoided by your MAJOR player.

    I can think of only two bike companies which qualify as "MAJOR" and which would have the chutzpah to take on Stans and try to market a so called super sealant: Specialized and Shimano.

    I will argue in advance that whatever they come up with has been done before, and it will be a variation of the S.O.S. Period. It will NOT be better or even different. Anybody who falls for it is a victim of marketing and nothing more.
    I have converted to cafeLatex 100% now. It did get a bad rep, but it actually seals beads and such better than stans and doesn't weep do to it's skinning property. Everyone whined about the skinning but it's actually a good thing as it doesn't weep if stood for a long time like the home brews do.

    I've seen the stans booger up more than once, dries up faster. But, the CaffeLatex does have a harder time sealing the larger holes. I started adding a few pinches of glitter to the stuff and it's been flawless for a few years now. I've had 2 flat in 3 yrs with it and both were 3/4" or longer gashes in the side walls.. and the last one even though the Caffelatex didn't 100% seal it I did get it to hold it closed enough to get out riding, just had to keep pumping up ever few miles.. and the sealant was EVERYwhere on the frame.

    I've gotten more than a few non tubeless setups that Stans wouldn't seal to work with the Caffelatex, including my own getto setup with Gorilla tape on P-35 rims and the older version of Mtn king 29er tires. With Stans I was loosing air and having to pump up the tires every few weeks. once I got the Caffe Latex and got a couple rides in it never leaked again.

    One note.. Stans and Caffe latex DON'T MIX!!! you'll end up with a stringy, gooey a$$ mess if you don't clean one out REALLY WELL!! before trying the other .. personal experience!!

    one other thing... when seating new wheels NEVER add glitter or anything till the beads are seated.. the stuff will seal leaks but you don't want it between the bead of the rim and tire.. just plugging the holes...

    also, no matter if you use Stan's, Caffe Latex, home brew or any of the tire Manufactures brands .. NEVER USE CO2 on a tire with sealant.. you could end up flash freezing the liquid and get all kinds of issues.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Stans consists of liquid latex, propylene glycol and water. All tubeless mtn bike sealants are latex based except Cafelatex, which uses an artificial latex concoction. The reviews in this forum of Cafelatex are not exactly glowing as far as sealing punctures. The main use for latex sealants is to seal beads and casings on non UST tires so they can be run tubeless. If you can't achieve an air tight seal, you don't have a tubeless tire. Sealing punctures is related, but really another subject.

    Many MTBR tubeless riders have concocted their own latex based "homebrews", costing a fraction of any commercial sealant and working as well or better. What comes with the territory of latex and water is coagulation and evaporation. That means boogers and eventual drying is inevitable and cannot be avoided by your MAJOR player.

    I can think of only two bike companies which qualify as "MAJOR" and which would have the chutzpah to take on Stans and try to market a so called super sealant: Specialized and Shimano.

    I will argue in advance that whatever they come up with has been done before, and it will be a variation of the S.O.S. Period. It will NOT be better or even different. Anybody who falls for it is a victim of marketing and nothing more.
    Wow, ignorance is bliss they say. FWIW my background is coatings/adhesives chemistry (might be why I'm involved with the manufacturer, lol) and my best friend is at one of the leading manufacturers of latex polymer chemistries in the world. To assume "latex" is all the same (especially comparing to what Stan's is using) is flat out hilarious so thanks for the morning laugh! The new sealant is so different from Stan's that it doesn't even use glycol. And, I can assure you, no one else is making this formula. Marketing didn't seal up my tire better with no weeping! Doubters gonna doubt, riders gonna ride...

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Last edited by Gman086; 05-21-2012 at 02:18 PM.
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  29. #29
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    , . Marketing didn't seal up my tire better with no weeping! Doubters will doubt, riders will ride..
    And the flip side is that there is no end to how much money poseurs will spend on over hyped bling they don't need.

    My morning laugh is thinking of you blowing all kinds of cash on the magic sealant developed by your rocket scientist friend at the undisclosed MAJOR company, while my homebrew is so inexpensive I can replace it in 4 wheelsets any time I feel like going to the trouble for pennies. It works fine, doesn't bleed, and does not have a logo on it that itself costs money.

    Have fun wasting yours.
    Last edited by dwt; 05-20-2012 at 11:30 AM.
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  30. #30
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    Why don't we have a nice technical discussion about the metrics that make a sealant "good", instead of how homebrew sealants are cheap. Because we all know that price is not a metric for sealant, VALUE is. Effectiveness divided by what you put in (money, time, etc)

    I'll start.

    1) A sealant is good when it lasts a very long time without either drying out or coagulating, necessitating replacement. A sealant that has turned into one big booger has an effectiveness of zero, thus it's value is zero, even if you got it for free. A free sealant that requires replacement 4 times a year, vs a commercial one twice a year, does not come out on top of value unless your time is worth less than $5 an hour.

    2) A sealant is good if it can somehow manage to seal up sidewall holes by itself during normal riding.

  31. #31
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    Why don't we have a nice technical discussion about the metrics that make a sealant "good", instead of how homebrew sealants are cheap. Because we all know that price is not a metric for sealant, VALUE is. Effectiveness divided by what you put in (money, time, etc)

    I'll start.

    1) A sealant is good when it lasts a very long time without either drying out or coagulating, necessitating replacement. A sealant that has turned into one big booger has an effectiveness of zero, thus it's value is zero, even if you got it for free. A free sealant that requires replacement 4 times a year, vs a commercial one twice a year, does not come out on top of value unless your time is worth less than $5 an hour.

    2) A sealant is good if it can somehow manage to seal up sidewall holes by itself during normal riding.
    Whatever you say.

    I seriously doubt any homebrewer would rate their sealant at zero value or they wouldn't use it, recommend it, or post up their recipes on MTBR so that superior people will ridicule them. I rate mine high in performance and a great value. I change it twice a year on 4 wheelsets.

    IOW, sealant ain't broke, so it don't need fixing. Improvement is always welcome, but if the price tag is too high, you ain't going nowhere, no matter how perfect the product is. If our rocket scientist can achieve no. 2, then maybe he has a shot of siphoning off a few people who have been happy with what they have been using for years. Maybe.

    IME, sidewall damage consist of cuts, not round punctures. I have never seen any latex sealant seal a cut. I have seen it leak like a sieve. In many instances, superglue applied from the outside will be a sufficient trailside cut repair and get you home. In others, you've gotta tube up.

    So if Rocket Scientist and MAJOR player can seal a sidewall cut along with all the other perfection, they could get a foot in the door so long as they don't go too long on the price. And if they are blowing smoke, they will get hammered.

    We will see.


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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    IOW, sealant ain't broke, so it don't need fixing. Improvement is always welcome, but if the price tag is too high, you ain't going nowhere, no matter how perfect the product is.
    Well here we have a difference of opinion. I think sealant is broke if it dries up or coagulates. If Mr Major Player can make a sealant that even lasts twice as long as Stan's or Ghetto Homebrew, meaning that I don't have to change it for another 6 months, then I will pay that stupid extra $1 per serving.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    Well here we have a difference of opinion. I think sealant is broke if it dries up or coagulates. If Mr Major Player can make a sealant that even lasts twice as long as Stan's or Ghetto Homebrew, meaning that I don't have to change it for another 6 months, then I will pay that stupid extra $1 per serving.
    Yes it IS a matter of opinion. I like what have and how it performs, and while I don't have my exact numbers handy, homebrew is way more than $1 per serving savings over Stan's.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    And the flip side is that there is no end to how much money poseurs will spend on over hyped bling they don't need.

    My morning laugh is thinking of you blowing all kinds of cash on the magic sealant developed by your rocket scientist friend at the undisclosed MAJOR company, while my homebrew is so inexpensive I can replace it in 4 wheelsets any time I feel like going to the trouble for pennies. It works fine, doesn't bleed, and does not have a logo on it that itself costs money.

    Have fun wasting yours.
    Uhm, I get it free so... way more than a $1 per serving cheaper than your homebrew, LMAO!

    dwt - you should join the comedy circuit, you really are hilare!

    Have FUN!

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    I got sick and tired of dealing with goo as well, so I went back to tubes and haven't looked back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    Uhm, I get it free so... way more than a $1 per serving cheaper than your homebrew, LMAO!

    dwt - you should join the comedy circuit, you really are hilare!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Would rather be on the comedy circuit than a self important name dropping poseur on a mt . bike forum.

    Do you seriously get a charge coming on MTBR bragging that you are a rocket scientist with a "MAJOR" player which has developed a magic sealant that never dries up, never coagulates and plugs sidewall cuts, and meanwhile insult lay people who just ride bikes? You need help. Either that or penis enlargement pills.

    One more piece of advice. Don't let the marketing dept of MAJOR player read the crap you post on MTBR,or they'll fire your ass and stick with the other rocket scientist. Bad PR from employees with bad attitudes usually is not rewarded.
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    can we go back to discussing the technical merits of sealant, plz?

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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    can we go back to discussing the technical merits of sealant, plz?
    Why bother. If rocket scientist is correct and not blowing smoke, anything now on the market soon will be obsolete.



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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    can we go back to discussing the technical merits of sealant, plz?
    Absolutely! Learned that the new sealant will coagulate behind punctures for, basically, a more permanent repair of punctures vs. natural latex that the popular brand uses (though I admittedly had some thorn holes that were never an issue after sealing with that). Unfortunately, their kick off not slated until August (July for Europe - why do they always get the goods first?) so my lips are sealed... and so are my tires.

    Have FUN!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Would rather be on the comedy circuit than a self important name dropping poseur on a mt . bike forum.

    Do you seriously get a charge coming on MTBR bragging that you are a rocket scientist with a "MAJOR" player which has developed a magic sealant that never dries up, never coagulates and plugs sidewall cuts, and meanwhile insult lay people who just ride bikes? You need help. Either that or penis enlargement pills.

    One more piece of advice. Don't let the marketing dept of MAJOR player read the crap you post on MTBR,or they'll fire your ass and stick with the other rocket scientist. Bad PR from employees with bad attitudes usually is not rewarded.
    Let's get this straight - I NEVER said I was a rocket scientist nor even a chemist working on the product NOR am I with a major player. Simply put, my background allows me to understand the technical aspects of these sealants better than most. Simply informing forum members that a better product is coming that alleviates the drawbacks of the popular brand. I like to ride bikes and share my knowledge to help other riders as most here will attest. Technology advances... get used to it!

    Have FUN!

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    Last edited by Gman086; 05-21-2012 at 05:23 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    Let's get this straight - I NEVER said I was a rocket scientist nor even a chemist working on the product NOR am I with a major player. Simply put, my background allows me to understand the technical aspects of these sealants better than most. Simply informing forum members that a better product is coming that alleviates the drawbacks of the popular brand. I like to ride bikes and share my knowledge to help other riders as most here will attest. Technology advances... get used to it!
    It's the attitude. If you have expert or inside knowledge and want to help and educate people on MTBR, there are subtler ways of getting it across than insulting people and coming off as an arrogant, smug, insider connected know it all.

    I have no problem with any improving, developing or evolving technology. I do have a problem with hype and over marketing.

    The sealant I use needs no improvement, especially at a high price.

    I really hope the MAJOR player you have lunch with but don't work for is
    Specialized, because this will be yet another product of theirs which I will never buy. Plus, by being associated with such an unpleasant person as you, it gives me another reason to hate them and the thuggish way they throw their weight around. Win win.



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    I use Slime Pro, 1 yr, love it.

    Most guys I ride with (all) use Stans,they love it. I like Slime Pro. use old tooth brush to rub some around rims edges, put on one bead, pour slime, put on other bead, floor pump only.
    I tried Geax, worked great but dried and boogered in 3 months
    I tried Hutchinson, worked great but disappeared when I went to change tire 5 months later. Use care when inflating w/ Hutchinson, don't clog line while filling tire. Slime Pro so far for me. I saw Chris put a 1cm rip in his tire, Stans flew everywhere, then sealed up 10 minutes later. He kept adding air instead of putting tube in. Very impressive.

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    Never understood the idea of home brew sealants. A big ol bottle of Slime Pro is $12 and will do 6-8 tires: Slime 10112 Slime Slimepro Tubeless Sealant . Tubeless set-up is kind of a messy PITA to begin with, why would anyone want to further complicate it by mixing their own brew? To save a few $? That's cool, but not worth my time, at all.

    I welcome whatever sealant advancements come. Who wouldn't? Less time fuggin with tires and more time riding sounds great to me!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    Never understood the idea of home brew sealants. A big ol bottle of Slime Pro is $12 and will do 6-8 tires: Slime 10112 Slime Slimepro Tubeless Sealant . Tubeless set-up is kind of a messy PITA to begin with, why would anyone want to further complicate it by mixing their own brew? To save a few $? That's cool, but not worth my time, at all.

    I welcome whatever sealant advancements come. Who wouldn't? Less time fuggin with tires and more time riding sounds great to me!
    ya.. I have to agree... I get the big bottle of Caffe Latex for $23 and it lasts me like 4 yrs.. and that's not just doing my bike but friends bikes, lawn tractor, wheel burrow, lawn trailer, car trailer and the only reason I bought more this yr was I forgot to close it when doing my neighbor wheel burrow and knocked it over, sealed my garage floor nicely

    I keep looking at the home brew and thinking it's about the same price and I'll end up with gallons of stuff sitting in my garage.. sure per use it's cheaper but it's over kill to store unless you are doing a fleet of bikes...
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post

    So if Rocket Scientist and MAJOR player can seal a sidewall cut along with all the other perfection, they could get a foot in the door so long as they don't go too long on the price. And if they are blowing smoke, they will get hammered.

    We will see.
    Agreed. Don't care unless it can seal a small cut.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    Never understood the idea of home brew sealants. A big ol bottle of Slime Pro is $12 and will do 6-8 tires: Slime 10112 Slime Slimepro Tubeless Sealant . Tubeless set-up is kind of a messy PITA to begin with, why would anyone want to further complicate it by mixing their own brew? To save a few $? That's cool, but not worth my time, at all.
    Mixing homebrew is child's play and saves more than a few bucks.. A"big ol bottle" of Slime Pro is all of 16 oz. for $12.00 if you can find it at that price.
    The most basic homwbrew consists of one part Moldbuilder and two parts propylene glcylol antifreeze. You can get creative and add other ingrediants, but these two are all you need. It take all of 5 minutes to mix one pint of mold builder with a quart of antifreeze. 1 pint mold builder @ $13.26+ 1 quart of antifreeze@ $1.00, gives you 48 oz of sealant for $14.00 +/- That would be less than $3.50/16 oz. This brew seals beads as well as any thing now on the market, and stays liquid as long or longer. not so good with punctures without other ingredients.

    i welcome whatever sealant advancements come. Who wouldn't? Less time fuggin with tires and more time riding sounds great to me!
    That would be true if the new magic sealant works as advertised and is not priced outrageously. You talk abourt saving time. I have 4 wheelsets of tubeless tires which are holding air just fine, thank you. What could possibly motivate me to pop them all of the rims and remount with the magic sealant? That would be insane.
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    ^^^^
    What dwt said regarding why bother with homebrew. My reason for trying homebrew at all is that my wife is a crafter and so I spend quite a bit of time walking through the craft store with her. I saw the mold builder on the shelf, I had read about saving money making your own sealant, so I decided to give it a try. I agree about how easy it is to to make, about the same level of difficulty as making juice from concentrate. My batch has lasted me 3 years and I've just procured the ingredients to make my second batch. I have 2 wheelsets that are setup tubeless, but I only ever swap tires on the one set. I swap tires about 5 times a year on it, topping off the sealant each time. I do find that the sealant dries up/disappears at a much slower rate than Stans, but it does still happen. Same with the booger forming. I have no issue with Stans and would use it again with no qualms if it was all that was available. It just so happens that there is a much cheaper alternative available that seems to perform just as well. I have never tried Caffe Latex, but its reviews on this site have kept me from wanting to try it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Mixing homebrew is child's play and saves more than a few bucks.. A"big ol bottle" of Slime Pro is all of 16 oz. for $12.00 if you can find it at that price.
    The most basic homwbrew consists of one part Moldbuilder and two parts propylene glcylol antifreeze. You can get creative and add other ingrediants, but these two are all you need. It take all of 5 minutes to mix one pint of mold builder with a quart of antifreeze. 1 pint mold builder @ $13.26+ 1 quart of antifreeze@ $1.00, gives you 48 oz of sealant for $14.00 +/- That would be less than $3.50/16 oz. This brew seals beads as well as any thing now on the market, and stays liquid as long or longer. not so good with punctures without other ingredients.



    That would be true if the new magic sealant works as advertised and is not priced outrageously. You talk abourt saving time. I have 4 wheelsets of tubeless tires which are holding air just fine, thank you. What could possibly motivate me to pop them all of the rims and remount with the magic sealant? That would be insane.
    At $2 per tire for Slime Pro, ANY savings to be had via a home brew is minuscule. When you factor in the value of your time, the cost of materials, driving around to obtain the materials, storage containers, clean-up costs, etc, you are saving WAY less than $2 per tire, if you're saving anything at all. Considering a decent bike costs over a grand, trying to save $2 per tire is kinda like weaving your own floor mats for your AMG Benz. If you just enjoy doing it, great, but the savings and cost-effectiveness of it is dubious.
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    On a value for money basis, I just bought some OKO ATV sealant from a moto supplier for $15 for 1.25litres (about 42 fluid ounces). I was going to try to mix up some homebrew but the ingredients in Aust like "Slime Pro" are not easy to come by.

    I'll report back after some testing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Stans consists of liquid latex, propylene glycol and water. All tubeless mtn bike sealants are latex based except Cafelatex, which uses an artificial latex concoction. The reviews in this forum of Cafelatex are not exactly glowing as far as sealing punctures. The main use for latex sealants is to seal beads and casings on non UST tires so they can be run tubeless. If you can't achieve an air tight seal, you don't have a tubeless tire. Sealing punctures is related, but really another subject.

    Many MTBR tubeless riders have concocted their own latex based "homebrews", costing a fraction of any commercial sealant and working as well or better. What comes with the territory of latex and water is coagulation and evaporation. That means boogers and eventual drying is inevitable and cannot be avoided by your MAJOR player.

    I can think of only two bike companies which qualify as "MAJOR" and which would have the chutzpah to take on Stans and try to market a so called super sealant: Specialized and Shimano.

    I will argue in advance that whatever they come up with has been done before, and it will be a variation of the S.O.S. Period. It will NOT be better or even different. Anybody who falls for it is a victim of marketing and nothing more.
    I don't understand how you can dismiss advances in tubeless sealant outright.
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    I've never seen any sealant seal a sidewall cut like this...

    If a homebrew can do this, I'm all for it. This was the pic from the Orange Seal rider. I get the sense there is a lot of disbelief that scientists can come up with a better solution. I think they can and will and we'll all be in heaven when they do. Thanks Gman for the info. I don't see you as having an attitude at all.
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    Last edited by indyfab25; 05-22-2012 at 06:34 PM.
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    That's impressive. What sealant did that? "Orange Seal"?
    Last edited by TigWorld; 05-22-2012 at 10:27 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    That's impressive. What sealant did that?
    Prolly a tube.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    On a value for money basis, I just bought some OKO ATV sealant from a moto supplier for $15 for 1.25litres (about 42 fluid ounces). I was going to try to mix up some homebrew but the ingredients in Aust like "Slime Pro" are not easy to come by.

    I'll report back after some testing.
    According to their website, OXO also has the "Puncture Free" and "X-Treme" sealants, which are somehow more designed for bicycles. Their website is really not clear on what the difference between their products is, though. This one is for "competition". That one is for "extreme conditions".

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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    According to their website, OXO also has the "Puncture Free" and "X-Treme" sealants, which are somehow more designed for bicycles. Their website is really not clear on what the difference between their products is, though. This one is for "competition". That one is for "extreme conditions".
    Yeah, their website is pretty uninformative. No one's got the bicycle stuff in Oz but the fast shipping moto store has the ATV and MX/Enduro variants. For $15 I figured I'd just give the big bottle of ATV stuff a go. The bicycle stuff also seems about 4x as expensive. It would be interesting to know what the difference is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    Prolly a tube.
    Nope. Orange Seal did that. Folks need to get over themselves and realize better options are coming.
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25 View Post
    Nope. Orange Seal did that.
    Oh that's sweet!
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25 View Post
    Nope. Orange Seal did that.
    Sweet. Bring it on. I have 2 tires in good shape collecting dust because of small cuts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    Sweet. Bring it on. I have 2 tires in good shape collecting dust because of small cuts.
    Forget sealant for cuts. This will solve your problem.

    Gorilla Glue - Super Glue
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Forget sealant for cuts. This will solve your problem.

    Gorilla Glue - Super Glue
    I just use regular glue type tube patches.. works perfectly, just clean the inside of the tire with alcohol and slap the glue and patch on.. have a tire with 3 patches and one is almost 4 yrs ..
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    I just use regular glue type tube patches.. works perfectly, just clean the inside of the tire with alcohol and slap the glue and patch on.. have a tire with 3 patches and one is almost 4 yrs ..
    I agree. What I have SERIOUS doubts about is any cliam that a sealant will clog - let alone repair - a sidewall cut.

    I don't need to get over myself. Folks making the claim have the burden of proof because if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

    As a metaphor, of I told you that a new chain lube was coming out that required only one application per year, wet or dry use, would you jump on that bandwagon, or say "Yeah, right."
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    I agree. What I have SERIOUS doubts about is any cliam that a sealant will clog - let alone repair - a sidewall cut.

    I don't need to get over myself. Folks making the claim have the burden of proof because if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

    As a metaphor, of I told you that a new chain lube was coming out that required only one application per year, wet or dry use, would you jump on that bandwagon, or say "Yeah, right."
    What I would do is try it before making prejudicial statements. That is obviously where we differ.
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stumpjumpy View Post
    Never understood the idea of home brew sealants. A big ol bottle of Slime Pro is $12 and will do 6-8 tires: Slime 10112 Slime Slimepro Tubeless Sealant . Tubeless set-up is kind of a messy PITA to begin with, why would anyone want to further complicate it by mixing their own brew? To save a few $? That's cool, but not worth my time, at all.!
    If you can't handle the time and mixing two solutions together in a bucket, I suppose that wheelbuilding is light years off your radar screen. Much more time, effort and skill required.
    There's no end to what bike enthusiasts will do to enhance their enjoyment of the sport.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    If you can't handle the time and mixing two solutions together in a bucket, I suppose that wheelbuilding is light years off your radar screen. Much more time, effort and skill required.
    There's no end to what bike enthusiasts will do to enhance their enjoyment of the sport.
    I am actually a big proponent of DIYing, whether it be bikes cars or home improvement/maintenance. I have spent many a weekend in my garage swapping track car suspensions, brakes, r&ring heads, installing/tweaking forced induction systems, fabricating oil cooler set-ups, etc. Something tells me that assembling/installing a BMW head with variable valve timing, etc is a tad bit more complicated than assembling a bike wheel - but I've never done a wheel, so I won make that claim.

    I'm sure my neighbors think I'm crazy when they see me doing all kinds of stuff that most people pay for. I do it simply because i enjoy it. But I have no delusions that I am saving money, as my time is worth a lot of money. I DIY stuff for the fun of it and the peace of mind of knowing it was done "right".

    Using my time to home brew sealant to MAYBE save $1 per wheel on my $3k bike is not cost effective, nor is it creating a better sealant, nor is it cutting down on the many containers of various paints, lubes, fluids, cleaners, etc stacked all over my garage, but I can see how one might feel good about mixing their own brew just for sharts and giggles. Not knocking it, it's just not something that I would tout as the pinnacle of mtb tire sealant tech and the ultimate in cost-effectiveness.

    Claiming some real "savings" and knocking premade sealants and being a naysayer re improved sealant products that may be on the horizon makes zero sense to me, though.
    Last edited by Stumpjumpy; 05-23-2012 at 11:19 AM.
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  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25 View Post
    I don't understand how you can dismiss advances in tubeless sealant outright.
    I'd be lying if I didn't admit that I don't find Orange Seal very intriguing

    But, again, is it incumbent on me to buy and test it to see if it works. Or on them to me that it works first? They have a "nail gun test"on their wEbsite. Most of us know that Stan's, homebrew and other latex based sealants will pass this test as well. Sidewall cut not so much. A video showing Orange seal doing this. Would shut me up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Forget sealant for cuts. This will solve your problem.

    Gorilla Glue - Super Glue
    I know. Haven't repaired them yet but I will when I need them.

    Gluing trailside is real tough when the puncture has wet sealant in it. A sealant that will fill it on the fly will be a small miracle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    Most of us know that Stan's, homebrew and other latex based sealants will pass this test as well.
    I have my doubts that your homebrew can seal this type of big puncture because it has no particles in it and it is also heavy on the glycol, which promotes seeping instead of drying and sealing. Not that I think this is super relevant since I don't run over nails and icepicks anyway.

    The Orange Seal website is kind of disappointing, as they do very little to explain why their product is better than others. Maybe they don't want to give out too much info. The website mentions "nanites" particles, which to me is pretty clearly marketing hype, as most likely the particles range in size from at least 10um and up. It also has a section that says"4oz of sealant adds only ?? grams to your wheel." Come on, guys.

    The particle shape and size will have a big effect on how quickly and effectively the sealant can seal a big hole. Ideally particles that are good at sticking to each other as well as bits of latex. Maybe Orange Seal has fibers, who knows. I let the homebrew guys play around with this stuff and then have a Major Player with real engineers, a test lab, and the ability to develop actual "nanite" particles perfect the design and sell it to me.

    Oh right, the Major Player sealant is not latex based.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwt View Post
    It's the attitude. If you have expert or inside knowledge and want to help and educate people on MTBR, there are subtler ways of getting it across than insulting people and coming off as an arrogant, smug, insider connected know it all.

    I have no problem with any improving, developing or evolving technology. I do have a problem with hype and over marketing.

    The sealant I use needs no improvement, especially at a high price.

    I really hope the MAJOR player you have lunch with but don't work for is
    Specialized, because this will be yet another product of theirs which I will never buy. Plus, by being associated with such an unpleasant person as you, it gives me another reason to hate them and the thuggish way they throw their weight around. Win win.



    ---
    I am here: http://tapatalk.com/map.php?odo3wx
    Okay, my attitude towards you went south after you posted this:

    "I will argue in advance that whatever they come up with has been done before, and it will be a variation of the S.O.S. Period. It will NOT be better or even different. Anybody who falls for it is a victim of marketing and nothing more."

    Honestly, how is THAT not insulting to me when you're suggesting that I'm an ignorant victim of marketing? And yes, I was insulting to you with my responses so I do apologize for stooping to that level; that was out-of-line. We all have our opinions. Mine happen to be based on insider knowledge, not some marketing BS which is the point I was trying to make. Happy trails dwt, no hard feelings.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN

    PS - You and me both if it were Speshy!
    Last edited by Gman086; 05-24-2012 at 01:49 AM.
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  69. #69
    dwt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    Okay, my attitude towards you went south after you posted this:

    "I will argue in advance that whatever they come up with has been done before, and it will be a variation of the S.O.S. Period. It will NOT be better or even different. Anybody who falls for it is a victim of marketing and nothing more."

    Honestly, how is THAT not insulting to me when you're suggesting that I'm an ignorant victim of marketing? And yes, I was insulting to you with my responses so I do apologize for stooping to that level; that was out-of-line. We all have our opinions. Mine happen to be based on insider knowledge, not some marketing BS which is the point I was trying to make. Happy trails dwt, no hard feelings.
    Honestly, I admit my statement was ignorant and I deserved to get hammered. I'm afraid to check to see how many neg reps I got in this thread.
    Agreed, no hard feelings Thx.

    PS - You and me both if it were Speshy!
    Keep up the good work. I welcome advancements, impovements and evolution in technnology. I am NOT however looking forward to changing 8 tubeless tires But it is looking like that may have to come to pass.
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  70. #70
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    My homebrew sealant works great, just need to make sure there is enough in the tires

    Finished my ride on a rocky trail on Friday night with 2 soft tires. I pumped them back up to my normal riding pressure and could hear the "ppppsssss" sound of an air leak near the bead on both tires. Seemed like an odd place for the leaks and in spots where typical sloshing of sealant while riding might not reach it. Let them sit overnight leaning against a wall with location of the leak in the 6 o'clock position. The next morning they were completely flat. I pumped them both back up to 40 psi with the leaks still at the 6 o'clock position, picked them up and did the shake as shown on the notubes.com site, and on both tires heard the satisfying sounds of air leaking "ppppsssss" followed by the "fwoomp!" of the sealant clogging the leak and stopping the air flow. I confirmed that the pressure was holding, then aired down and added more sealant via an injector through the stems with removable cores, then aired back up to my riding pressures (25 psi front/ 29 psi rear).
    My point of this anecdote is that: (1) homebrew works great and (2) homebrew does lose volume over time and you still need to make sure there is enough sealant in the tire to do what you want it to. On Sunday's ride the tires behaved perfectly with no loss of pressure.

    UPDATE: I swapped out the tires mentioned above the other night. I found a nail in one of them! The homebrew sealant had completely sealed it, I don't recall ever hitting the nail nor losing pressure due to the nail. I don't think the nail caused the above-mentioned flats because in that instance I could see that the air was leaking from near the beads. The nail was directly in the middle of the tread. I pulled it out and let the old sealant that I couldn't suck out with the injector pool up over the hole. We'll see how the plug holds next time I mount those tires up.
    Last edited by ewarnerusa; 06-29-2012 at 11:43 AM. Reason: Update

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    Orange seal has worked great for me this year but no punctures or sidewall cuts yet. However I have seen numerous pictures of cuts and punctures clogging up. Even some sidewall seals on the fly were only a little air needed to be added.

    The owner is a good guy to deal with and the product has worked well for me so i will continue using it. Their chain lube is also great but it needs to be applied more than once a year

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    New sealant released?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    Absolutely! Learned that the new sealant will coagulate behind punctures for, basically, a more permanent repair of punctures vs. natural latex that the popular brand uses (though I admittedly had some thorn holes that were never an issue after sealing with that). Unfortunately, their kick off not slated until August (July for Europe - why do they always get the goods first?) so my lips are sealed... and so are my tires.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Thread resurrection, researching options and I did not see a post revealing the new product.

    Any updates?

  73. #73
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    Product was introduced at Trek World 2013 and is being marketed under the Bontrager label with product designation TLR Tire Sealant: Bontrager TLR Tire Sealant - Wheel - Replacement Parts - Accessories -Trek Store

    According to the website, it is not yet available to the general public. I have been using it all year with fantastic results. You truly use half as much as the leading brand and drying out is no longer an issue. It is also ammonia free so no more worries with tire compatibility like the leading brand has. I'm a believer!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    Yeah, their website is pretty uninformative. No one's got the bicycle stuff in Oz but the fast shipping moto store has the ATV and MX/Enduro variants. For $15 I figured I'd just give the big bottle of ATV stuff a go. The bicycle stuff also seems about 4x as expensive. It would be interesting to know what the difference is.
    One year later, I would love to hear of your experience with OKO please. I'm about to try tubeless for the first time and this OKO stuff sounds good (but that's in their words).
    I wrote to them yesterday to ask if it's OK to use their ATV sealant in a mountain bike tyre. This was the reply today:
    "The simple answer is that you can use OKO Off Road (which is sold for ATVs) in your mountain bike. A typical MTB tyre requires 120ml."

  75. #75
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    I used it and couldn't get it to work in its unadulterated form. It was too thick to properly distribute in the tyre. It really has a thick jelly like consistency and failed to seal up my conti race sport tyres. It would weep through the sidewalls but at no time would it harden and stop weeping. Pretty disappointing result all round. Their MTB specific stuff may be different.

    Just today I set up a new tyre using the Conti Revo sealant. I'm hoping it will stay liquid longer than the Stans.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    I used it and couldn't get it to work in its unadulterated form. It was too thick to properly distribute in the tyre. It really has a thick jelly like consistency and failed to seal up my conti race sport tyres. It would weep through the sidewalls but at no time would it harden and stop weeping. Pretty disappointing result all round. Their MTB specific stuff may be different.

    Just today I set up a new tyre using the Conti Revo sealant. I'm hoping it will stay liquid longer than the Stans.
    Thanks mate. I really appreciate the info.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigWorld View Post
    I used it and couldn't get it to work in its unadulterated form. It was too thick to properly distribute in the tyre. It really has a thick jelly like consistency and failed to seal up my conti race sport tyres. It would weep through the sidewalls but at no time would it harden and stop weeping. Pretty disappointing result all round. Their MTB specific stuff may be different.

    Just today I set up a new tyre using the Conti Revo sealant. I'm hoping it will stay liquid longer than the Stans.
    The Revo looks only a little thicker after about two months in my dry Socal desert climate. Stan's would be nothing but a booger after this time. Revo has been an improvement over Stan's, but it didn't seal the one small sidewall puncture that I had quick enough to prevent me from using a tube. I'm going to try some Orange Seal this week to see if the hype is real.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by TTTURNER View Post
    Revo has been an improvement over Stan's, but it didn't seal the one small sidewall puncture that I had quick enough to prevent me from using a tube. I'm going to try some Orange Seal this week to see if the hype is real.
    Also had a small puncture yesterday that Continental Revo Sealant couldn't seal. Had to stop 8x to reinflate my rear tire over a 1 mile distance. A real bummer. With Sludge or NoZisch, that would have been peanuts and I would have been able to finish my ride. Downside of the latter is that it is very hard to clean out your tires (in case that's important), and it is really sticky making it difficult to insert a tube when needed : the sidewalls just stick together firmly.

  79. #79
    dwt
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    Exhausted with tubeless goop.

    My ugly ghetto trail fix is to dab superglue over the puncture from the outside. IME the combo of superglue outside and sealant inside will seal up.

    This is how ugly it looks, but if it holds air who cares?

    Exhausted with tubeless goop.-imageuploadedbytapatalk1371904649.966415.jpg
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by djandyszontagh View Post
    On my girl friends bike she has been using slime pro for over two years. She still hasn't replaced it. I use stans on my bike and it dries up in 3 months. I am about to switch to slime pro.
    I started with Stans last year. I had one puncture that took a long time to seal and lost 10psi while it did. When I had to pull the tire off, it was a big glob of latex and some liquid. I switched to Slime Pro after that but it was late in the season and I didn't get much riding in.

    I'm pulling the tires off this week to replace some broken nipples and true the wheels, I'm interested to see what Slime looks like after sitting over the winter.

  81. #81
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    ^^Let us know OK^^ Pics are good LOL
    Ride MORE = Live Longer
    Love Dirt / Hate Pavement

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burt4x4 View Post
    ^^Let us know OK^^ Pics are good LOL
    I finally had time to pull the wheels down and I'm happy to report that the Slime Pro I put in at the end of last year was still in liquid form. No chunks of latex and it didn't dry up.

    And it still had about an ounce left inside the tire. I'll be putting Slime Pro back in.

    Sorry, no pictures. I was busy working and didn't think about it.

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