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  1. #1
    Hike it or Bike it!
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    Digging a broken I9 spoke out of the hub.

    Question: How do I remove the broken portion of an I9 spoke that is in the hub. The spoke snapped off flush at the hub. The allen key wrench is not working even though it is the right size.

    Do I drill with a Dremel or a regular drill [and how do I do that without damaging stuff?], send the wheel back to I9, or is there a routine anyone knows works? I don't want to damage the threads for the spoke in the hub.

    Odd that there's nothing about this on the I9 site or in their manuals.

  2. #2
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
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    What do you mean theallen is not working???

    P.S. One more reason not to buy a I9 wheelset (unless it uses a classic hub...)
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  3. #3
    Vaginatarian
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    Hmm
    I never had an issue, did I9 send you the wrench or did you buy it? I bought one and it was rounded from the start, then I9 sent me one with my pawls and it works like a charm

  4. #4
    Master of the Face Plant
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    Send it back, if you damage the threads you are screwed.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil
    What do you mean theallen is not working???

    P.S. One more reason not to buy a I9 wheelset (unless it uses a classic hub...)
    The allen wrench is the correct size (it's a .050) and fits in my spare spoke heads perfectly, but even after trying to clean all the gunk out of the end of the spoke (mud and what not), the allen key just spins on this particular broken spoke. Not on others, just that one. So I can't get it out.

  6. #6
    g3h6o3
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    So did you try a screw extractor? And don't listen to Dremer who says to use a tap....

    I agree with sandman about being sure not to damage the threads... which might end up in you sending the wheel in.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  7. #7
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    if it were my wheel and i had the spoke ready to go i'd drill through from the allen key side with maybe an .080 drill,it'll proabely spin out ,if it doesn't ,i have a fairly complete drill index and if you keep drilling a bit bigger at some point things will loosen up. It's important to have sharp drills,i have a set of short stubby drills ,they seem good for lining up and less flexy for driving out stuck parts. Using a really thin tap is proababely asking for trouble. When you buy equipment,you do have to realize if the repairs and adjustments are beyond your capabilitys and that you're gonna have to hand over repairs to someone else. You'll have to pay them to do it ,or it's gonna be a bit of an inconvenience, shipping stuff back for repairs. Some people get very upset when bicycle repairs get a bit involved , yet they have no trouble handing off their cars or motorcycles for simple repairs, then there's calling a plumber or electrician for your house.
    Last edited by herbn; 03-09-2010 at 02:58 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    if it were my wheel and i had the spoke ready to go i'd drill through from the allen key side with maybe an .080 drill,it'll proabely spin out ,if it doesn't ,i have a fairly complete drill index and if you keep drilling a bit bigger at some point things will loosen up. It's important to have sharp drills,i have a set of short stubby drills ,they seem good for lining up and less flexy for driving out stuck parts. Using a really thin tap is proababely asking for trouble. When you buy equipment,you do have to realize if the repairs and adjustments are beyond your capabilitys and that you're gonna have to hand over repairs to someone else. You'll have to pay them to do it ,or it's gonna be a bit of an inconvenience, shipping stuff back for repairs. Some people get very upset when bicycle repairs get a bit involved , yet they have no trouble handing off their cars or motorcycles for simple repairs, then there's calling a plumber or electrician for your house.
    I am not afraid to send it in or take it somewhere and pay to have it done properly.

    I was a bit surprised I cannot get the allen key to turn the broken portion. Pretty hard to get a drill bit in at the correct angle from the allen key side - at least with the equipment I have. Is it not advised to drill up from the bottom side where the spoke is broken since I happen to have a straight shot in from the bottom side? I don't own a screw extractor, but if they make one that small and I could drill a pilot hole in there - again, it would have to be from the bottom as that is the only straight in shot available due to the hub design - perhaps I could get it out of there.

    I guess I could try to cut a groove in the bottom of the flush portion of the spoke so I could work a small flat head screwdriver in there to just unscrew it out. What would I use to cut a groove?

  9. #9
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    Sorry about my post,I was just walking past my I9 dh wheels and i realized the impossibility of your situation,ouch, i was just thinking of the hub without the whole wheel around it, If it's a manufacturing defect that the allen key fitting is wrong ,they messed up and the wheel has to come totally apart to drill out the spoke end and clean the threads. who knows they might just have a special tool for that ,maybe a tapered allen key that can be tapped into the hole and spin that sucka out,get in touch with them they should fix that little debacle they made. It is sort of a coinsidence that just the spoke you broke is the defective one, that's a long shot.Unless of course the machining error on the spoke effected the strength, Did it just break or was there a stick or something involved?

  10. #10
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    like others said, maybe try EZ-out in the hex hole side.

    you could also buy a hobby store finger hand drill thing so you can do it very carefully. it is a mini drill you spin with your fingers. I would think the Al shouldn't be too tough

  11. #11
    29 some of the time...
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    Dang, the allen is an .050"
    That is stupid small for aluminum.

    Not really an easy way out. Screw extractors, drilling, headaches, etc... Bummer
    Have you tried soaking the offending spoke with liquid wrench, triflow, WD-40, or something? Aluminum on aluminum could have some galling or corrosion mucking up the works.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  12. #12
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    half jokingly ,a dentist could probabely drill it out.

  13. #13
    Hike it or Bike it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    half jokingly ,a dentist could probabely drill it out.
    Good idea.

    Got it solved. Wheel is being serviced.

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