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  1. #1
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    Didn't drill out inner rim hole - Bontrager SSR 29er, stans rim strip

    Need some help.

    To make a long story short, I have a '11 Trek X-Caliber 29er with the Bontrager SSR rims. I bought the bike new when the LBS bought back my Stumpjumper. I asked them to setup the X-Cal tubeless, and they informed me that the rimstrips that I had on the Stumpy would work on the X-Cal.

    About a month into riding the X-Cal, I had a flat that the Stans wouldn't seal. I took the wheel and tire into another bike shop, to see if they could get it to seat, and they couldn't. He ended up selling me a Fast Trak that setup perfectly. One comment that he made didn't really sink in at the time, but it basically was regarding he did something so that the valve would seat better.

    I destroyed the side wall on the other tire a couple of weeks later, and ended up throwing a tube into tire #1 (the one we could not get to seal tubeless), and riding it that way the rest of the season last year.

    Fast forward to today, and I have a new tire that I want to put on the rim setup tubeless. I put the stans rim strip in, and got the tire to inflate without any Stans fluid. It held air as long as I did not inflate it over 40psi. If I inflated over 40, it would leak loudly at the valve until it got below 40. I figured that once I put the Stans fluid in, that would seal up. I was wrong.

    I think that what the bike shop guy did to the front wheel was to drill out the inner hole on the rim to get it to seat. I didn't think to check the rear wheel when I went to seal it all up earlier.

    I don't ever ride over 32 psi, so I'm not too concerned that it won't currently hold 40psi, but I do want to seal that valve up to prevent a slow leak.

    What are my options? Could I get away with a rubber grommet around the valve stem, under the nut where the air is leaking? Or should I just toss the Stans fluid that is in there, pull the rim strip out, and drill it?

    Your thoughts are appreciated.

    FWIW - the tire is a Bontrager tubeless ready tire.

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by John.M View Post
    Need some help.

    To make a long story short, I have a '11 Trek X-Caliber 29er with the Bontrager SSR rims. I bought the bike new when the LBS bought back my Stumpjumper. I asked them to setup the X-Cal tubeless, and they informed me that the rimstrips that I had on the Stumpy would work on the X-Cal.

    About a month into riding the X-Cal, I had a flat that the Stans wouldn't seal. I took the wheel and tire into another bike shop, to see if they could get it to seat, and they couldn't. He ended up selling me a Fast Trak that setup perfectly. One comment that he made didn't really sink in at the time, but it basically was regarding he did something so that the valve would seat better.

    I destroyed the side wall on the other tire a couple of weeks later, and ended up throwing a tube into tire #1 (the one we could not get to seal tubeless), and riding it that way the rest of the season last year.

    Fast forward to today, and I have a new tire that I want to put on the rim setup tubeless. I put the stans rim strip in, and got the tire to inflate without any Stans fluid. It held air as long as I did not inflate it over 40psi. If I inflated over 40, it would leak loudly at the valve until it got below 40. I figured that once I put the Stans fluid in, that would seal up. I was wrong.

    I think that what the bike shop guy did to the front wheel was to drill out the inner hole on the rim to get it to seat. I didn't think to check the rear wheel when I went to seal it all up earlier.

    I don't ever ride over 32 psi, so I'm not too concerned that it won't currently hold 40psi, but I do want to seal that valve up to prevent a slow leak.

    What are my options? Could I get away with a rubber grommet around the valve stem, under the nut where the air is leaking? Or should I just toss the Stans fluid that is in there, pull the rim strip out, and drill it?

    Your thoughts are appreciated.

    FWIW - the tire is a Bontrager tubeless ready tire.
    Does the rim have a TLR logo on it?

    If so, get the proper Bontrager TLR rimstrip and valve and setup is stupid easy.
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  3. #3
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    No "TLR" on the rim.

    Rubber grommet would not work. Looks like I'll be taking it all apart, and working on the rim to be sure it seats fully.

  4. #4
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    I wouldn't trust it if it won't hold more then 40psi.

  5. #5
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    I went ahead and took the tire off, as well as the rim strip and original rim tape. Put a layer of Gorilla tape directly on the rim, overlapping the valve opening by a couple of spokes in both directions, and reassembled. I cut a very small opening for the valve that I had to push it through. One good thing is that I was able to save 75% or so of the stans that was in the tire. I remounted it, and it aired up with no problems.

    The only problem I encountered was that I aired the tire a bit north of 50 psi (55 I think was where I stopped - I was confusing this with another set that I just put on my SS) - which was the limit of the tire. After going for a quick ride, I hung the bike, and was getting ready to go inside when the tire blew off of the rim, spraying stans juice everywhere! I cleaned it all up, and it is now back to good with a mere 40 psi in it to help everything seat perfectly.

    To be clear - I did not drill out the rim. I did however pay close attention to the rim strip as the SSR valve hole appears to be a bit off center. The strip seated better one way than the other, so that is what I went with.

  6. #6
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by John.M View Post
    No "TLR" on the rim.

    Rubber grommet would not work. Looks like I'll be taking it all apart, and working on the rim to be sure it seats fully.
    Crap shoot.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by John.M View Post
    I went ahead and took the tire off, as well as the rim strip and original rim tape. Put a layer of Gorilla tape directly on the rim, overlapping the valve opening by a couple of spokes in both directions, and reassembled. I cut a very small opening for the valve that I had to push it through. One good thing is that I was able to save 75% or so of the stans that was in the tire. I remounted it, and it aired up with no problems.

    The only problem I encountered was that I aired the tire a bit north of 50 psi (55 I think was where I stopped - I was confusing this with another set that I just put on my SS) - which was the limit of the tire. After going for a quick ride, I hung the bike, and was getting ready to go inside when the tire blew off of the rim, spraying stans juice everywhere! I cleaned it all up, and it is now back to good with a mere 40 psi in it to help everything seat perfectly.

    To be clear - I did not drill out the rim. I did however pay close attention to the rim strip as the SSR valve hole appears to be a bit off center. The strip seated better one way than the other, so that is what I went with.

    I don't want to be a bummer but a lot of times when a tire blows off a rim with a tubeless installation it can destroy or stretch the bead making the tire blow off at random times in the future. I would check that the bead snaps during installation. If it only snaps on one side or not at all I would be really hesitant to run it tubeless.

    That said you shouldn't ever go about about 40psi in a tubeless installation. The max pressure on a tire is for a tire inflated with a tube, which holds the bead on the rim. Without the tube holding the bead you are relying on the bead doing all the work to hold against a lot of air. Riding it at this pressure is ever worse as you are putting pressures on the sidewall which can cause the bead to move.

    Check out the guidelines on Stans website for mounting to their rims and doing a conversion with their kits, it is pretty good information even for any conversion.
    Try this: HTFU

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    I don't want to be a bummer but a lot of times when a tire blows off a rim with a tubeless installation it can destroy or stretch the bead making the tire blow off at random times in the future. I would check that the bead snaps during installation. If it only snaps on one side or not at all I would be really hesitant to run it tubeless.

    That said you shouldn't ever go about about 40psi in a tubeless installation. The max pressure on a tire is for a tire inflated with a tube, which holds the bead on the rim. Without the tube holding the bead you are relying on the bead doing all the work to hold against a lot of air. Riding it at this pressure is ever worse as you are putting pressures on the sidewall which can cause the bead to move.

    Check out the guidelines on Stans website for mounting to their rims and doing a conversion with their kits, it is pretty good information even for any conversion.
    Thanks for your comments. When I put it back on, I heard it snap all the way around on both sides. I also was not aware that I should avoid taking it over 40. If 30 is good, 40 is better right (just kidding - I know better now...).

    The tire still required a lever to remount when I put it back on, so I'm feeling ok that the bead didn't stretch to an unsafe extent. I also checked the air pressure a couple of times after reinstalling it, and the loss was minimal (1-2 psi) over a couple of hours. I think I did air it up to around 40 psi, and it dropped to 38psi. I'll check it again when I get home tonight.

    Thanks again for your help. Hopefully someone can learn from my experience (what not to do).

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